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Old 02-06-2018, 01:26 PM
 
581 posts, read 304,472 times
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I found out that the gas company is going to run a gas line (they say 4 inch pipe) in between my house and my neighbor’s house. There's only about 10 feet in between our houses, so we're not talking about much property here. Gas lines already exist in my neighborhood, as utilities are all underground. This is about connecting my neighborhood area to the area behind me, which is actually another municipality.

Supposedly in between our houses is an easement giving them right of way. I didn’t know there was an easement there, it wasn't explained to me when I bought the house, nor does it show on the survey. I guess I do now.

They say most of the digging will be in the front, and then they will drill underground to the back of the house and then hook up with another pipe that’s in the neighborhood (city) behind me. Once this is complete, nothing should even be noticeable, expect a manhole cover near the sidewalk.

Is this pretty common? As a homeowner, should I be concerned? Are there any questions to ask and/or do I need to do anything to protect my interests? I'm really not that worried about it. But should I be?

There's a part of me that wants to say sure you can do this, for a $20,000 assessment because this is my property and my property value could be negatively affected.
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Old 02-06-2018, 01:53 PM
 
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If there is an established easement, then it should appear as an exception on the title report. (I think).

If the easement is valid you probably have no choice whatever. They may be allowed to dig up up then entire easement if they choose.
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Old 02-06-2018, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Salem, OR
13,682 posts, read 31,102,423 times
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Utility easements are common and it would appear as an exception on your title report. So pull out your documents, look for the title report, and you should see the easement there. You can't charge them money for access as it was already granted to them in the deed to the house.

It doesn't devalue your home to have a manhole cover out in front of it. Most homes have utility easements on them. It kind of goes with wanting to have power, water, sewer, gas, cable, etc. Why do you think it devalues your home?
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Old 02-06-2018, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Austin
7,014 posts, read 16,591,474 times
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Most houses have 5' utility easements all around their properties. It should be noted on your survey, but as was mentioned above, it's definitely going to be noted in your title policy.
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Old 02-06-2018, 02:31 PM
 
581 posts, read 304,472 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverfall View Post
Utility easements are common and it would appear as an exception on your title report. So pull out your documents, look for the title report, and you should see the easement there. You can't charge them money for access as it was already granted to them in the deed to the house.

It doesn't devalue your home to have a manhole cover out in front of it. Most homes have utility easements on them. It kind of goes with wanting to have power, water, sewer, gas, cable, etc. Why do you think it devalues your home?
They showed the easement on a survey they had. It was very difficult to see this on the drawing. They even admitted it could hardly be seen.

I had a grandmother who had some lines running underground on her property and it caused the ground major issues. But that might have been sewer lines or something else. I just know it was "utility" lines.

Like I said, I wasn't to worried about it. But where I live there is such a small amount of space anywhere for anything. Running a gas line 5 feet from my house all the way down the side for 100 feet seems kind of risky and/or dangerous. This is not a small gas line for my house, mind you, it's for the "city".
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Old 02-06-2018, 03:22 PM
 
6,341 posts, read 7,107,958 times
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It's amazing what they can put underground without too much surface disturbance. You really shouldn't be worried about that part. Most utilities are pretty good about making sure that they have recorded easements before doing any work. As others have noted, the recorded easement should have shown up on your title report. You did get a title report or a title insurance policy, correct? That does sound like a small space to run a gas line but, if they already have easement rights, there's not much that you can do about it.
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Old 02-06-2018, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
37,427 posts, read 36,304,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blazin65 View Post
... and my property value could be negatively affected.
How, exactly?
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Old 02-06-2018, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Pahoa Hawaii
2,082 posts, read 4,489,237 times
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Look up the San Bruno explosion.
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Old 02-06-2018, 04:35 PM
 
6,341 posts, read 7,107,958 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leilaniguy View Post
Look up the San Bruno explosion.
That will calm their fears. That was a 30-inch pipeline, though.
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Old 02-06-2018, 04:39 PM
 
998 posts, read 454,961 times
Reputation: 1587
A 4 inch gas main that's installed by horizontal drilling won't be an issue at all. The new lines today are one piece with no joints for very long distances, so chances of a leak or ground issues are minimal. There are parts of Houston that have 100 year old or older gas lines in the ground, and there are very few issues, and those are usually caused by someone digging up the line, or hitting it with equipment. The biggest risk for leaks is where the houses connect. I wouldn't worry about the gas line, and if there's an easement, there's nothing you can do in any case.
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