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Old 02-12-2018, 01:51 PM
 
10,536 posts, read 4,133,981 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
Because basements are always a problem. Always. (just my experience)
How are they a problem? I would like my next house to have a basement even unfinished. I grew up in a house with a basement and I don't remember ever having any kind of issues. It didn't have a sump pump and was never wet no matter how much it rained. We used to play down there all the time. I know some basements will have a problem, but all of them?
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Old 02-12-2018, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
12,305 posts, read 10,088,058 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
Because basements are always a problem. Always. (just my experience)
I've had a basement for well over 40 years and have never had a problem. What problems have you experienced?
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Old 02-12-2018, 02:34 PM
 
6,134 posts, read 3,340,144 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
Because basements are always a problem. Always. (just my experience)
I guess this is largely dependent on where the "here" in otterhere is. Always had a basement, always had a totally dry basement.
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Old 02-12-2018, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Raleigh NC
7,808 posts, read 6,165,571 times
Reputation: 6919
I don't think in the Boston thread I was making any attempt to say why that neighborhood or style of house might have trouble selling. I said it appeared to be presented poorly.

I've also weighed in again on this thread, that if there WERE basement space but it wasn't accurately presented that way, that was a testament to the quality of agent selected.

I'm in state X. I'm looking at houses in state X. Why don't some of the homes show pictures of Y?

I think the quality of answer the OP would receive would be better served in their local forum. We have numerous real estate topics in my local forum. If they're relevant to the local market, I don't suggest they should be asking in this forum.

Now, "Why do some agents leave out photos of the basement when there is one?" is an easy to answer question - because it's deemed unappealing, or because there's a photo limit (and other photos deemed of higher value), or because the agent and Seller aren't presenting it correctly.

"Why do some listings only have 3 photos, all of the outside?" similarly easy to answer.

It's like asking about photos of a garage. I've seen some killer, sparkling-clean garages. Sometimes there is a photo of them. I find most garages either have always been used partially/wholly as storage space, or during the listing process, everything that's pulled out of the house is stored there. Not very photogenic.
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Old 02-12-2018, 06:08 PM
 
1,528 posts, read 732,906 times
Reputation: 2062
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoBromhal View Post
I don't think in the Boston thread I was making any attempt to say why that neighborhood or style of house might have trouble selling. I said it appeared to be presented poorly.

I've also weighed in again on this thread, that if there WERE basement space but it wasn't accurately presented that way, that was a testament to the quality of agent selected.

I'm in state X. I'm looking at houses in state X. Why don't some of the homes show pictures of Y?

I think the quality of answer the OP would receive would be better served in their local forum. We have numerous real estate topics in my local forum. If they're relevant to the local market, I don't suggest they should be asking in this forum.

Now, "Why do some agents leave out photos of the basement when there is one?" is an easy to answer question - because it's deemed unappealing, or because there's a photo limit (and other photos deemed of higher value), or because the agent and Seller aren't presenting it correctly.

"Why do some listings only have 3 photos, all of the outside?" similarly easy to answer.

It's like asking about photos of a garage. I've seen some killer, sparkling-clean garages. Sometimes there is a photo of them. I find most garages either have always been used partially/wholly as storage space, or during the listing process, everything that's pulled out of the house is stored there. Not very photogenic.
I agree with you that photos of basements are like photos of garages. Common logic says that you don't include them but occasionally you have a really pristine one that helps to tell the story of the home that you wish to tell (e.g. its owners were meticulous). But that's an exception, not a rule.

i don't think it's a state specific question more than most of the questions here. I think we all can agree that just about everything in real estate has a local flavor to it. But there are commonalities and we can all learn from each other.

I still don't understand your argument for this being specific to NJ. Many states have homes with basements as the norm. Unless you can demonstrate that there is something different about NJ basements and the way people value them or perceive them, then I think you don't have a case. Have you even spent any time in NJ?
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Old 02-12-2018, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Raleigh NC
7,808 posts, read 6,165,571 times
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as little as possible. I know lots of folks from NJ. they've moved to my state.
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Old 02-12-2018, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Raleigh NC
7,808 posts, read 6,165,571 times
Reputation: 6919
with your continued line of examination, I fear you think I don't know what a basement looks like, which states they may be common in, or why someone would have any interest in various types of basement. I assure you that the great state of NC has plenty of basements, both modern and old, finished and unfinished, utility (ie, where the mechanicals are in a concrete walled area, but at chest level it's crawlspace) and creepy.

Rest assured, my response was not about "basements? Never heard of them. You should stick to NJ" and more about if you are living in a specific place and looking in that same place, an oddity that you've found of that particular market are best addressed in ... that market.
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Old 02-13-2018, 04:14 PM
 
Location: NYC
11,841 posts, read 7,742,973 times
Reputation: 12824
I wouldn't buy an old house with a basement unless I get someone to fully inspect the foundation. The earth moves and all old foundations have stress cracks. It's a matter of time unless you live somewhere with solid bedrock or newer foundation. Besides that having a basement is difficult to keep dry from pests, mold, moisture, and just extra maintenance.
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Old 02-14-2018, 02:50 AM
 
11,573 posts, read 5,543,963 times
Reputation: 9901
Quote:
Originally Posted by runswithscissors View Post
Maybe that's why my attempt at humor didn't register with you.

They most certainly ARE a bad thing for people with dampness and mold sensitivities. They're a clear signal that we would never want to buy that property.
When we bought our house, it was in a new development. The builder's sales agent told us that every single family house would have a basement with a sump pump in it. Due to the land, they wouldn't be able to build any houses with true walkout basements. If the houses had had walkout basements, no sump pump would have been installed.

Our house never had any flooding in the basement. At one point, we put in a new sump pump with a backup battery, which gave us peace of mind. One wouldn't want the power to go out in a heavy rain storm so having a backup battery was well worth the expense.

Don't assume that the presence of a sump pump means that "dampness and mold" are present.
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Old 02-14-2018, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Kansas City North
3,630 posts, read 6,787,167 times
Reputation: 4650
Quote:
Originally Posted by BOS2IAD View Post
Don't assume that the presence of a sump pump means that "dampness and mold" are present.
This. In Kansas City, MO, a sump pump is required if all four walls of the basement are below grade. If itís a walk-out, itís not required but many builders will put in the pit anyway.
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