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Old 02-15-2018, 02:44 AM
 
5,678 posts, read 7,263,702 times
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I’ve seen plenty of houses that stated “seller will not make repairs” sell for at, near or even above the list price. Many times they will also include the statement “priced accordingly,” (although that one isn’t always true).
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Old 02-15-2018, 10:15 AM
 
2,039 posts, read 950,239 times
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So what? If they don't want to do repairs, they don't want to do repairs.

I think they are just heading off inspection negotiations.
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Old 02-15-2018, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Kalamalka Lake, B.C.
2,966 posts, read 3,762,829 times
Reputation: 3768
Default Unfortunately, they can't be saved; they're consumers

Quote:
Originally Posted by oh come on! View Post
It's amusing how some people think they can buy a house and never do maintenance on it.

They think paint is a waste of money, and let the whole house peel away and rot, which is even more expensive to repair than painting. They don't understand the concept of an ounce of prevention.
They don't realize that maintenance is for their own benefit.

And then when it comes time to sell the junk heap, Agent writes "owner will not do any repairs", which is advertising to the world that this home is a sh-hole.
No one looks at the home besides lowballing flippers, and owners balk at their offers.
These people need saving.

Have you tried to sell a home without doing repairs? What were you thinking?
I just got cable TV after 25 years of no TV shows and these problematic "house purchase" shows, staged, and often in my old hood, the Northwest, where mold, water damage, bad 70's contract construction is behind the walls and out of sight reign supreme.

One show caught my attention: a trophy blonde owned low bank waterfront along the Ohio river, and had spent huge coin doing all the you could visibly see, but what she needed was a HYDRAULIC ENGINEER study to tell her her entire foundation is not saveable/buildable/rescuable. DUH!!! Recommendatiion: Trout Pond.

Her multi-million dollar (US $) expenditure was worth nothing.
Lesson: You want to know the "building envelope" and the structure is good to go, and meets modern demands. Money well spent.
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Old 02-15-2018, 11:48 AM
 
1,778 posts, read 868,438 times
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OP I agree with you 100000 per cent.

There are people who don't understand that to sell something for the price you want, you have to make it appealing most of the time. If you choose to live a certain way, that is fine, but when you go to sell, you have to make your home enticing to others who may not share your lifestyle values. Otherwise, just call those folks at We Buy Ugly Houses and get what they offer you. It won't be top dollar.

You see it all the time in this forum-- I want to sell but I refuse to paint/do repairs of basic things/get rid of the roaches and rats/listen to advice from others or feedback from those who toured. So...okay. That is your choice. But there is a better way.

I have a friend who has terrible breath. Dental issue or something else, I don't know. People have given him the feedback that he needs to see a doctor/dentist. Could be an easy fix. Could be difficult. No one knows. He refuses to get help for this or "make a repair". Its "take me as I am." Fine. But this man is trying to date. Guess what? His dates tend to be put off by the breath. Thus he is not successful.

You can lead a horse to water, as they say. Humans can be very stubborn and get in their own way.

Last edited by emotiioo; 02-15-2018 at 12:00 PM..
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Old 02-15-2018, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
12,305 posts, read 10,052,184 times
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Depends. I bought a house that needed a lot of work done. I knew it needed it when I bought it. Last owners were here for 30+ years and didn't do anything until they wanted to sell it. Took a long time to sell and they didn't get a great offer on it. I know because I made the offer and their realtor had a cow over my offer. They took it though. I said it was my final offer. I wouldn't be countering. I knew there was a lot to be done. Still is. We're slowly getting things done.

Many people don't know about maintenance. Many people can't afford repairs. Many people don't know people to make the repairs and are afraid of getting ripped off. There are many people who just don't care. I look it this way....it gives people bargains to buy!
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Old 02-15-2018, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
6,970 posts, read 5,191,475 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oh come on! View Post
It's amusing how some people think they can buy a house and never do maintenance on it.

They think paint is a waste of money, and let the whole house peel away and rot, which is even more expensive to repair than painting. They don't understand the concept of an ounce of prevention.
They don't realize that maintenance is for their own benefit.

And then when it comes time to sell the junk heap, Agent writes "owner will not do any repairs", which is advertising to the world that this home is a sh-hole.
No one looks at the home besides lowballing flippers, and owners balk at their offers.
These people need saving.

Have you tried to sell a home without doing repairs? What were you thinking?
I think these are all too often estates or bank owned properties.

If you have five siblings, and five opinions on the negotiation, its a lot easier for the executrix to say "It is what it is" period, over and out.

One was a family member that, while he had the financial resources to fix the place, was rapidly declining healthwise. It was a rental property and was bound for a builder's bulldozer anyway, simply because the neighborhood was so valuable.

I can think of two more relatives, both elderly, both moving into places where they could be cared for. No dementia or anything, but slow, tired, and declining...It wasn't written in the ad, but both times it was explained to the realtor thusly: "The roof is five years old. The furnace is 25 years old at least. The hot water heater is new. The kitchen is 25 years old. We're happy to have a handy man do some minor work, but we aren't investing much..." The next owner asked us to fix the (always broken as far as we remember) sliding screen door and a couple outlets, and after closing proceeded to largely redo the place (carpet, kitchen, fixtures, paint.)
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Old 02-15-2018, 02:18 PM
 
49 posts, read 23,187 times
Reputation: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by oh come on! View Post
It's amusing how some people think they can buy a house and never do maintenance on it.

They think paint is a waste of money, and let the whole house peel away and rot, which is even more expensive to repair than painting. They don't understand the concept of an ounce of prevention.
They don't realize that maintenance is for their own benefit.

And then when it comes time to sell the junk heap, Agent writes "owner will not do any repairs", which is advertising to the world that this home is a sh-hole.
No one looks at the home besides lowballing flippers, and owners balk at their offers.
These people need saving.

Have you tried to sell a home without doing repairs? What were you thinking?
While your points are valid to some extent you are looking at the issue with very narrow goggles.
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Old 02-15-2018, 05:16 PM
 
Location: NJ
304 posts, read 91,811 times
Reputation: 1058
We do repairs as we can. There always seems to be a list of to-dos and we slowly plug away at them. Some things are less important than others. Even with money to do it all time is a big factor. Just being home for repairmen or having the time to research projects and plan or simply know who to call- a carpenter or general contractor etc is kind of a pain. The people we bought from used a handy-man for a lot of things that we've had to go back over and hire a professional to do it right. I can't complain though because we did fully know what we were getting into and the things we had to fix were pretty much easy to fix.

We did buy our home intending to live in it for at least 8 years until retirement though. If we had just purchased it to turn it over in a few years we might not invest so much. Even now we are fixing it up with selling in mind. I won't lie and say I'm trying to do the purchaser favors. I just want it to be easier to sell when the time comes and ours is an older home. It was well-built but some things are needing attention. We bought our home "as-is" but we were still able to negotiate fixes and repairs on things we weren't willing to tackle.
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Old 02-15-2018, 08:20 PM
 
25,824 posts, read 49,712,454 times
Reputation: 19262
Real Estate is local and it really depends on your market...

The SF Bay Area is really about location and "Anything" will sell and as of late it is all about location.

It is also true that many are somewhat clueless when it comes to maintaining a home...

I have seen truly spectacular property in terms of condition with park-like landscaping all let go... the buyers refused to water for what ever reason but are very pleased to be owners.

My parents were always frugal... but one thing Dad never skimped on is the roof, downspouts and gutters.

I have seen people spend a fortune on new kitchens and baths... but totally ignore a leaky roof... to the point of buckets inside.

I bought a 1922 home from the original owner... the last decade or so she physically couldn't get around and the home looked it...

I was on a budget and went room by room, cleaning, painting and refinishing... spent very little money except on the roof...

When it came time to sell... my 1922 home with the original high leg stove, yellow and blue kitchen tiles, original bath fixtures, built in hutches, bay window, matchstick hardwood and original restored double hung wood windows set a new area price... it was like stepping back in 1922 and except for the roof... cost very little in terms of cash to do.

Back on point... in a super seller's market... those who do very little often see the biggest percentage of gain for money expended... contrast this to the over improved property.
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Old 02-15-2018, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Kalamalka Lake, B.C.
2,966 posts, read 3,762,829 times
Reputation: 3768
There are two ways to "manage" property, especially if it's an "investment". Like a car, one approach is to do ongoing improvements, upgrades and small repairs immediately, and the opposite end is to do nothing for year and years.

In a hot market you can get away with running a place into the ground; the value is in the land, not the building. Of course your place for your renters is going to be a real craphole by the time you sell, but you don't give a Trumps' rear end as you're on your way to billionaire status and your tenant can go away.

IMO especially since my parents were landlords it's a cultural, emotional, and attitude thing that decides what approach "fits" your personality. My parents would NEVER do what Trumps son-in-law and his lawyers do to renters. Different attitude towards life.
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