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Old 03-30-2018, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Port St. Lucie, Fla
3,937 posts, read 6,393,018 times
Reputation: 1419

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and when one of those kids or an adult gets hurt on barbed wire fencing you will definitely hear about it....from their attorney, and you will lose.

CindyRoos...what did you decide?
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Old 03-30-2018, 09:37 PM
 
2,215 posts, read 755,118 times
Reputation: 3734
Quote:
Originally Posted by germaine2626 View Post
Many years ago my father had something somewhat similar happen to him. Someone wanted to cut down Christmas trees on his farm and then sell them----but he did not want to buy the trees from my father or share the money from selling the trees----he just expected my father to give him the trees for free since "he had so many of them".
People with a mindset like that are what poachers are made of. No boundaries.
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Old 03-30-2018, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,477 posts, read 6,188,133 times
Reputation: 7858
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlulu23 View Post
Don't leave us hanging . What happened next?
I said no. Just no. I was shocked, at first not really sure I heard that right. He left with a sulky kind of attitude.

I guess I should be glad he asked after reading this thread.
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Old 03-30-2018, 11:21 PM
 
980 posts, read 281,496 times
Reputation: 1430
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I said no. Just no. I was shocked, at first not really sure I heard that right. He left with a sulky kind of attitude.

I guess I should be glad he asked after reading this thread.
Some people feel entitled I guess.

A neighbor friend Steve noticed a few days ago that the neighbor beside him, Ed, cut down some tree branches. We think to get a better view. But the branches were on Steve's property. Ed did not own the trees he cut into. And Ed is a smart mature guy with a good job. Sometimes a person who does this is someone with a good ego too...he might want to have a better view and feel he's entitled to it at nearly any cost.

Anyway, Steve is going to leave it alone for now but if it happens again, he'll go talk with the guy.
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Old 03-30-2018, 11:37 PM
 
2,215 posts, read 755,118 times
Reputation: 3734
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I said no. Just no. I was shocked, at first not really sure I heard that right. He left with a sulky kind of attitude.

I guess I should be glad he asked after reading this thread.
Wow, there are some strange characters out there just seeing what they can get away with. He probably kept trying to take advantage of people till he found ones he could.
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Old 03-31-2018, 01:48 AM
 
Location: England
22,240 posts, read 5,505,415 times
Reputation: 29108
Reading this thread is so interesting. Neighbours arguing over land is world wide I guess. They tend to be about much smaller areas of land here in England! But, I have seen folks getting into legal disputes over inches of land, that end up costing vast sums. Something about land ownership goes deep into some folk's souls.

I bought a home over 35 years ago, that caused me problems. I had hardly finished unloading the furniture, before the guy next door came for a word with me. He said the house owner I had bought the house off, had taken part of his land when putting up a new fence. I had no idea what he was talking about.

Luckily, the houses were quite new, and my lawyer sent somebody out to measure the land. My fences were correct, and the new neighbour never spoke to me again!!

Recently, I have witnessed a dispute about land across the road from my home. It became physical, and the police had to be called out. I reckon they're arguing about a six inch wide strip of land, about 15 feet long. It doesn't take much for folks to get upset, and that's for sure.

The trouble is, sorting out issues like this can be real expensive when the two neighbours lawyer up. But, land disputes make selling a home real difficult, and need sorting out. There is a truce at the moment across the road from me, but it is not over by a long shot.
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Old 03-31-2018, 04:10 AM
 
1,528 posts, read 725,886 times
Reputation: 2062
Quote:
Originally Posted by English Dave View Post
Reading this thread is so interesting. Neighbours arguing over land is world wide I guess. They tend to be about much smaller areas of land here in England! But, I have seen folks getting into legal disputes over inches of land, that end up costing vast sums. Something about land ownership goes deep into some folk's souls.

I bought a home over 35 years ago, that caused me problems. I had hardly finished unloading the furniture, before the guy next door came for a word with me. He said the house owner I had bought the house off, had taken part of his land when putting up a new fence. I had no idea what he was talking about.

Luckily, the houses were quite new, and my lawyer sent somebody out to measure the land. My fences were correct, and the new neighbour never spoke to me again!!

Recently, I have witnessed a dispute about land across the road from my home. It became physical, and the police had to be called out. I reckon they're arguing about a six inch wide strip of land, about 15 feet long. It doesn't take much for folks to get upset, and that's for sure.

The trouble is, sorting out issues like this can be real expensive when the two neighbours lawyer up. But, land disputes make selling a home real difficult, and need sorting out. There is a truce at the moment across the road from me, but it is not over by a long shot.
I'm not an expert and I've forgotten a lot of details but from my experience, land disputes can be somewhat different in England - but as you say, the emotion is the same. Generally in England the fence marks the property line and (from my experience) land boundaries are not documented and getting a precise marking can be impossible. Physical boundaries are less ubiquitous in the US as compared to England.

Many years ago I had a house in England where the property line did not match the physical boundary and it was a big risk. The 3-4 foot sliver had to be under license (to avoid adverse possession) and that license could be revoked at any time. If the neighbor or a new neighbor wished to replace the fence to the property line (or better said, their view of what the property line was), there was no 'official' documentation as to where exactly the property line was. A dispute could easily arise in that case. You can prepare yourself for the possibility that the fence would be replaced and having to give up use of that land but not for the uncertainty of where the neighbor would decide to place the fence. As you suggest, inches matter in England and in this case, a few inches either way could mean the difference of having access through that area or not. Being able to move equipment through that space or not. Best to avoid anything like this.

So in a way, fences everywhere make it easier in England but on the other hand, when you have an absence of physical boundaries, there is not the legal structure/land registration structure to provide clarity on boundaries. Just my experience.
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Old 03-31-2018, 06:25 AM
 
Location: England
22,240 posts, read 5,505,415 times
Reputation: 29108
Quote:
Originally Posted by just_because View Post
I'm not an expert and I've forgotten a lot of details but from my experience, land disputes can be somewhat different in England - but as you say, the emotion is the same. Generally in England the fence marks the property line and (from my experience) land boundaries are not documented and getting a precise marking can be impossible. Physical boundaries are less ubiquitous in the US as compared to England.

Many years ago I had a house in England where the property line did not match the physical boundary and it was a big risk. The 3-4 foot sliver had to be under license (to avoid adverse possession) and that license could be revoked at any time. If the neighbor or a new neighbor wished to replace the fence to the property line (or better said, their view of what the property line was), there was no 'official' documentation as to where exactly the property line was. A dispute could easily arise in that case. You can prepare yourself for the possibility that the fence would be replaced and having to give up use of that land but not for the uncertainty of where the neighbor would decide to place the fence. As you suggest, inches matter in England and in this case, a few inches either way could mean the difference of having access through that area or not. Being able to move equipment through that space or not. Best to avoid anything like this.

So in a way, fences everywhere make it easier in England but on the other hand, when you have an absence of physical boundaries, there is not the legal structure/land registration structure to provide clarity on boundaries. Just my experience.
Yeah, land disputes here can get real messy. The problem across the road from me just makes me scratch my head. I have a copy of an old official plan of the immediate area around my home, and the land borders. A new guy bought a house, then extended it to the side and back. He then noticed that the neighbour next door's fence line was about six inches further than his. He then decided his land should extend further to match that fence next door.

He claimed the disputed land was partly occupied by a garage that had been there for decades. On my plan, the land line goes directly next to the garage. The new guy isn't having it, and says land has been stolen from his property sometime in the past. The neighbour in dispute says, the fence next door comes out further than it should, and he allowed this decades ago, so the guy didn't have to cut a wood panel, to fit the land border.

He said to me, it was just a few inches, and he didn't want to make a fuss. Well, that not making a fuss has come back to haunt him. The new guy seemed to accept the status quo, and started to put up a fence next to the garage. So, the old garage was knocked down, leaving just the concrete base. That was a mistake....... the new guy stopped building his fence, and once again demands the strip of land he says is his. I showed him the official plan, showing the land line was next to the garage, but he just isn't having it.

Sometimes, common sense goes out of the window, especially when it concerns land, even when it's a small amount. The new guy would love to just put a fence up, matching the one next door. But, he has the problem of the large concrete base still there from the old garage. He can't really lay a fence over that base. So, things have been quiet for a while. The new guy is parking his trash bins on the concrete base saying he is entitled because it's partly on his land!! I feel sorry for the elderly guy caught up in all this. He is in the right in my opinion, and the garage base is on his land. He can't afford to get involved with lawyers, and just wants to be left alone.
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Old 03-31-2018, 11:17 AM
 
1,512 posts, read 565,559 times
Reputation: 2944
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlaLadyB View Post
Interesting .....this post has now gone over 20+ pages long with everyone having an opinion on what the original poster should do..

WHAT DID YOU DO? Did you get a survey, put up a fence, go talk to the neighbors, what?

22 pages of inquiring minds wanna know?
Read the thread. Letters were sent. Fence going up at the thaw.
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Old 03-31-2018, 11:28 AM
 
6,359 posts, read 7,327,369 times
Reputation: 10807
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoamingTX View Post
Read the thread. Letters were sent. Fence going up at the thaw.
A letter was written but not sent. She's going to talk to the neighbors instead.
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