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Old 04-05-2018, 10:43 AM
 
28,383 posts, read 67,936,355 times
Reputation: 18189

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Depending one where you are located and where the vacant land is located it almost certainly makes sense to explore things with not just a "mobile home dealer" but the industry groups for the broader "manufactured housing" segment. The regulations run the gamut from "do whatever you want" to "towns in this area have had court battles to prevent mobile homes"...
https://www.manufacturedhousing.org/...1/1839temp.pdf
The big advantage to any manufactured housing option is still SPEED -- best case you can get the site prepped and any utility issues ironed out in literally a few weeks, take delivery / setup within a few months of finding what right for your situation...

Pretty much EVERY municipal water system I have ever heard of is NOT going to let anyone other than a licenses professional do the actual connections -- chance of even a very careful DIYer doing something that results in massive contamination / damage to shared infrastructure is a HUGE issue. This is not like doing a trench for your garden irrigation where you can just flush out the system, if e coli or other pathogens enter the water infrastructure people who are frail can literally die... Electricity provider is similarly going to create a safe meter connection with lock-outs as much to protect its own crews and equipment from any damage as to prevent customer from electrocuting themselves. For that matter the various county or municipal requirements to have a licensed excavation firm do the grading and site prep is a way to make sure that a heavy rain does not result in adjacent roadways and properties being buried in mud or some runaway logs.

In short, not saying that they may not be some steps aappropriate for skilled DIYer, just that there is world of difference between truly being in the "outback" / off the grid and instead simply being in a rural area where there are not simply "red tape" but rules that do protect those who provide various services. Also have to think that the great advantage of SPEED that manufacturing housing comes with is going to be loss with DIYers trying to squeeze in activities...
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Old 04-07-2018, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,483 posts, read 15,923,785 times
Reputation: 38776
Quote:
Originally Posted by chet everett View Post
Depending one where you are located and where the vacant land is located it almost certainly makes sense to explore things with not just a "mobile home dealer" but the industry groups for the broader "manufactured housing" segment. The regulations run the gamut from "do whatever you want" to "towns in this area have had court battles to prevent mobile homes"...
https://www.manufacturedhousing.org/...1/1839temp.pdf
The big advantage to any manufactured housing option is still SPEED -- best case you can get the site prepped and any utility issues ironed out in literally a few weeks, take delivery / setup within a few months of finding what right for your situation...

Pretty much EVERY municipal water system I have ever heard of is NOT going to let anyone other than a licenses professional do the actual connections -- chance of even a very careful DIYer doing something that results in massive contamination / damage to shared infrastructure is a HUGE issue. This is not like doing a trench for your garden irrigation where you can just flush out the system, if e coli or other pathogens enter the water infrastructure people who are frail can literally die... Electricity provider is similarly going to create a safe meter connection with lock-outs as much to protect its own crews and equipment from any damage as to prevent customer from electrocuting themselves. For that matter the various county or municipal requirements to have a licensed excavation firm do the grading and site prep is a way to make sure that a heavy rain does not result in adjacent roadways and properties being buried in mud or some runaway logs.

In short, not saying that they may not be some steps aappropriate for skilled DIYer, just that there is world of difference between truly being in the "outback" / off the grid and instead simply being in a rural area where there are not simply "red tape" but rules that do protect those who provide various services. Also have to think that the great advantage of SPEED that manufacturing housing comes with is going to be loss with DIYers trying to squeeze in activities...
There are many rural communities in my area that strictly prohibit manufactured homes.
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Old 04-09-2018, 03:32 PM
 
Location: New Britain, CT
582 posts, read 184,950 times
Reputation: 747
First thing to find out is if zoning even allows "trailer homes". You might see some around town, maybe close to your lot, but zoning may have changed and not allow new ones to be placed.
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Old 04-22-2018, 02:58 PM
 
Location: SC
1,876 posts, read 1,039,894 times
Reputation: 3002
Illinois is a big state. Start with your local county permitting office, and go from there. Do as much online research too, as possible Keep notes on everything you find out.
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Old 04-25-2018, 06:39 AM
 
Location: New Britain, CT
582 posts, read 184,950 times
Reputation: 747
Big state or not, the OP has to find out the zoning on their street, on that lot. Like I stated, there might be a trailer home across the street from this lot, but the zoning may have changed and no more trailer homes on that street in that town. That is step one....can you put one there. Might have to be minimum 2,500 square foot house zoning now..... Lots of suburban CT towns are like that now....
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