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Old 03-25-2018, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
31,698 posts, read 55,551,116 times
Reputation: 30277

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CGab View Post
Ok, so I see no one is really staying on topic here!


How did I find a good realtor? I actually went to an open house and after talking with the realtor we realized how fantastic she was so we hired her to sell are home. And she did within a few days! We were moving out of state and so she interviewed agents and found us one in the state we were moving to. Also another great realtor!


You have to do your homework, check references, reviews, ask around, etc. A good realtor usually doesn't fall into your lap.
Huh?

To wit:

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
Just another day on CD. The OP basically deleted the foundation of the thread, so it really has no reason to exist.
Hell, I reported it immediately, knowing that it would be what you see.


You might rephrase your the question as your own.

How are YOU trying to locate an agent, and what would you like from one?
And, are you buying, selling, or both?

Selling?
Here's a few questions and some guidance:
http://www.city-data.com/blogs/blog4...tions-ask.html

Buying?
Here's a few questions and some guidance:
http://www.city-data.com/blogs/blog4...g-realtor.html
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Old 03-25-2018, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Henderson, NV
824 posts, read 490,693 times
Reputation: 2234
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nypafl4u View Post
Can someone please explain how any of this applies to the title of "how to find a good realtor"?
It doesn't. There are dozens of current threads on the same topic that are well-informed by veteran agents, experienced lenders, clients and investors.

The OP is upset and wants everyone on the RE forum to know it. You didn't really lose any valuable time clicking and reading 37 posts....
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Old 03-25-2018, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
8,862 posts, read 17,493,686 times
Reputation: 6250
Quote:
Originally Posted by WVREDLEG View Post
...
Agents cannot win, because "the customer is always right".
Interestingly enough one of the first things I teach my new agents is that in RE the customer isn't always right. We are advisers and part of advising is telling the client when we disagree with them or if they are just flat out incorrect. The F&B crowd moving into RE have a hard time grasping it. Respect and service is a 2 way street. Before we show properties we sit down and educate and interview the consumer and if we're a fit we execute an agency agreement and get to work.
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Old 03-25-2018, 07:00 PM
 
Location: PVB
2,427 posts, read 1,230,101 times
Reputation: 2804
Default How to find a good realtor and what to look for

Contrary to what has been said on here I don't hate agents. I am trying to help buyers so they don't go through what we went through. For those who actually missed my post I will boil it down to a few paragraphs:

1. Many online agent reviews are meaningless. When you see too many five star reviews for an agent you should take it with a grain of salt. I looked on online and almost EVERYONE has 5 stars. The worst agent has a 3.9 and a few between 4.5 and 4.9 and the rest (90%) are 5 stars. Are these objective?

2. Teams. Many agents are part of a "team'. In my experience there are some "super agents" out there with fabulous websites, videos and many millions in sales. I said to myself "this is the agent for me". Did I get talk to or even meet that agent NOOOO. I got a "team member" who in my cases were new to the business (less than 2 years) and not very good. I understand some of those super agents want to deal with high net value customers and not waste time with low end sales, and it is totally understandable. People should realize this going in.

3. Referrals - I had experience where my local agent referred me to another agent in the area I was looking in. The agent I was referred to was fabulous and one of the best agents I have ever run across as well a extremely nice person. I still get birthday and Christmas Cards from them and they have 2 online reviews (both 5 stars which they more than deserve). That same agent referred me to another agent which they had met at a gathering. That agent turned out to be the WORST agent I have ever met and put me through hell. My point is, referring agents may or may not know the agent you are getting referred to or know them very well. They also have to share a portion of a commission, if it results in a sale. Some agents are happy with a referral and others are less than thrilled about splitting a commission. This is just something for prospective buyers to be aware of.

4. How to find a good agent. There are plenty of them out there. My best advice, if you are able to, is to go to a bunch of open houses and meet agents there. We met a fabulous agent who I overheard talking to a buyer and was very impressed. They turned out to be the agent that found us our home and was invaluable throughout the whole process. Feel free to quiz your prospective agent about things that you may want to know about like: are they full time?, how long have they been at it? Is this a career or something you do part time? how many houses have you sold? how long have you been in the area? do you live in the area I am looking at and if so how long? You can try asking on this forum, but I had terrible luck with the two agents that offered to help us through a PM.

5. Do you need an agent for a new build. I would say most likely. It costs you nothing (the builder pays for it) and if you can find an agent that is familiar with building and add-ons, it can be a tremendous help. I have met both kinds, one managed to save buyers a bundle and actually negotiate better prices plus advise what to do now and what to do later. Another dropped us at the sales office and was no help whatsoever and turned out to be a massive hindrance talking us into buying a house that was not right for us when we had major reservations.

Here is my advice for a prospective buyer:

Do your homework. There are many online sites where you can see houses with pictures, maps, sales and tax data, how long the house has been on the market, what neighboring houses are worth or went for. This is an invaluable resource. Before you go on a tour look up the house and see if it interests you. Its good to see houses regardless, just to get the feel for the area. Your agent will be more than happy to show you around plus the high points of the area. You cannot view many of these houses without an agent so they are necessary. Its also good to go to open houses where you will find a mixture of agents looking for prospective new buyers plus its also a way to drive traffic through a listing and keep the seller happy. Depend on yourself before making one of the biggest financial decisions of your life. You will be the one living there.
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Old 03-25-2018, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Athol, Idaho
2,182 posts, read 1,063,219 times
Reputation: 3184
This is thread number 4. Thread number three had a one sentence OP that only said something like "How to find a good agent. Ya good luck. You can never redeem yourself in my eyes. Keep walking. I'm way too hurt by that one.
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Old 03-25-2018, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
8,862 posts, read 17,493,686 times
Reputation: 6250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thundarr457 View Post

1. Many online agent reviews are meaningless. When you see too many five star reviews for an agent you should take it with a grain of salt. I looked on online and almost EVERYONE has 5 stars. The worst agent has a 3.9 and a few between 4.5 and 4.9 and the rest (90%) are 5 stars. Are these objective?

Well, sort of. Sometimes the customer knows the agent. Sometimes the agent buys reviews. Sometimes the client simply doesn't have enough experience to know the difference between a good agent and a bad agent. Online reviews are a great starting point to select agents to interview. Agents with many reviews are at least experienced.

2. Teams. Many agents are part of a "team'. In my experience there are some "super agents" out there with fabulous websites, videos and many millions in sales. I said to myself "this is the agent for me". Did I get talk to or even meet that agent NOOOO. I got a "team member" who in my cases were new to the business (less than 2 years) and not very good. I understand some of those super agents want to deal with high net value customers and not waste time with low end sales, and it is totally understandable. People should realize this going in.
Some agents are in a team but it's the minority. If you want the team lead ask for the team lead. Be aware the team lead may have limited time available for you.

3. Referrals - I had experience where my local agent referred me to another agent in the area I was looking in. The agent I was referred to was fabulous and one of the best agents I have ever run across as well a extremely nice person. I still get birthday and Christmas Cards from them and they have 2 online reviews (both 5 stars which they more than deserve). That same agent referred me to another agent which they had met at a gathering. That agent turned out to be the WORST agent I have ever met and put me through hell. My point is, referring agents may or may not know the agent you are getting referred to or know them very well. They also have to share a portion of a commission, if it results in a sale. Some agents are happy with a referral and others are less than thrilled about splitting a commission. This is just something for prospective buyers to be aware of. Referrals are like reviews. You improve your chances but it's a guarantee.

4. How to find a good agent. There are plenty of them out there. My best advice, if you are able to, is to go to a bunch of open houses and meet agents there. We met a fabulous agent who I overheard talking to a buyer and was very impressed. They turned out to be the agent that found us our home and was invaluable throughout the whole process. Feel free to quiz your prospective agent about things that you may want to know about like: are they full time?, how long have they been at it? Is this a career or something you do part time? how many houses have you sold? how long have you been in the area? do you live in the area I am looking at and if so how long? You can try asking on this forum, but I had terrible luck with the two agents that offered to help us through a PM. Interview interview interview. That's how you improve your chance of getting a good agent. Make sure you have an escape clause just in case you end up with a dud.

5. Do you need an agent for a new build. I would say most likely. It costs you nothing (the builder pays for it) and if you can find an agent that is familiar with building and add-ons, it can be a tremendous help. I have met both kinds, one managed to save buyers a bundle and actually negotiate better prices plus advise what to do now and what to do later. Another dropped us at the sales office and was no help whatsoever and turned out to be a massive hindrance talking us into buying a house that was not right for us when we had major reservations.Depends but doesn't usually hurt.

Here is my advice for a prospective buyer:

Do your homework. There are many online sites where you can see houses with pictures, maps, sales and tax data, how long the house has been on the market, what neighboring houses are worth or went for. This is an invaluable resource. Before you go on a tour look up the house and see if it interests you. Its good to see houses regardless, just to get the feel for the area. Your agent will be more than happy to show you around plus the high points of the area. You cannot view many of these houses without an agent so they are necessary. Its also good to go to open houses where you will find a mixture of agents looking for prospective new buyers plus its also a way to drive traffic through a listing and keep the seller happy. Depend on yourself before making one of the biggest financial decisions of your life. You will be the one living there.
Find an agent that does a good job marketing - nice photos, good descriptions without typos, a well written bio, and good reviews. Then interview a few.
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Old 03-25-2018, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Salem, OR
13,757 posts, read 31,670,380 times
Reputation: 12136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thundarr457 View Post

1. Many online agent reviews are meaningless. When you see too many five star reviews for an agent you should take it with a grain of salt. I looked on online and almost EVERYONE has 5 stars. The worst agent has a 3.9 and a few between 4.5 and 4.9 and the rest (90%) are 5 stars. Are these objective?
Objective? No. Agents ask clients that had a good experience with them to write a review. That is why you end up with such a big distortion in the positive direction. I do know that Zillow won't post some negative reviews as I have been told that by consumers that tried to leave one. You can post negative reviews on Google though. They don't filter them out so Google reviews are a bit more objective that way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thundarr457 View Post
2. Teams. Many agents are part of a "team'. In my experience there are some "super agents" out there with fabulous websites, videos and many millions in sales. I said to myself "this is the agent for me". Did I get talk to or even meet that agent NOOOO. I got a "team member" who in my cases were new to the business (less than 2 years) and not very good. I understand some of those super agents want to deal with high net value customers and not waste time with low end sales, and it is totally understandable. People should realize this going in.
I wouldn't say many, but teams are a growing trend in real estate. They are spearheaded by the rainmaker who generally takes all of the listings and has their other agents work with buyers. A lot of rookies work in this model to get experience. An agent can handle about 30-40 transactions by themselves before they have to have some sort of assistant or transaction coordinator to help. So if you see an agent with 100 transactions a year, they are not doing that by themselves. They have some sort of team. I know consumers are catching on because every client in an interview for the past two years has asked if they will be passed on to someone else or work directly with me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thundarr457 View Post
3. Referrals - I had experience where my local agent referred me to another agent in the area I was looking in. The agent I was referred to was fabulous and one of the best agents I have ever run across as well a extremely nice person. I still get birthday and Christmas Cards from them and they have 2 online reviews (both 5 stars which they more than deserve). That same agent referred me to another agent which they had met at a gathering. That agent turned out to be the WORST agent I have ever met and put me through hell. My point is, referring agents may or may not know the agent you are getting referred to or know them very well. They also have to share a portion of a commission, if it results in a sale. Some agents are happy with a referral and others are less than thrilled about splitting a commission. This is just something for prospective buyers to be aware of.
This depends on how well the agent has interviewed that person. So I would ask them agent giving the referral if they interviewed the agent to determine if they were qualified or not. Sometimes, especially franchisees, will refer within the franchise. Ask what the referring compensation is going to be. If it is really high, the other agent might not be able to give you great service. A few years ago, I got a call for a referral and they wanted 50% of the commission that I would get. I can't work for that so I said no. She said she was going to keep calling until she found someone to do it for that amount. So definitely ask because you don't want to be one getting the agent in town that agreed to work for pennies when everyone decent said no.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Thundarr457 View Post
4. How to find a good agent. There are plenty of them out there. My best advice, if you are able to, is to go to a bunch of open houses and meet agents there. We met a fabulous agent who I overheard talking to a buyer and was very impressed. They turned out to be the agent that found us our home and was invaluable throughout the whole process. Feel free to quiz your prospective agent about things that you may want to know about like: are they full time?, how long have they been at it? Is this a career or something you do part time? how many houses have you sold? how long have you been in the area? do you live in the area I am looking at and if so how long? You can try asking on this forum, but I had terrible luck with the two agents that offered to help us through a PM.
Agents on this forum aren't supposed to contact you and offer their services. That violates the TOS. Consumers can contact us, but not the other way around. Here are some interview questions for home buyers.

1. Are you full time or part-time?
2. How long have you been an agent?
3. If they are newer it is okay, but then ask, how often do you get supervision from your managing broker? How often are you getting trained on real estate issues NOT related to business development?
4. How long have you lived in this area?
5. What percentage of buyers vs. sellers do you represent?
6. About how many transactions a year do you complete?
7. What hours are you generally available?
8. How do you communicate with clients?
9. Will you help me do any due diligence on a property like finding comps, floodplains, permits, etc.?
10. How many buyers do you work with at any point in time?
11. What is the current inventory in my price range?
12. What is the average/median home price of homes in this area?
13. Do you require me to sign a buyer agency agreement?
14. Can I terminate the buyer agency agreement at any time if I am not satisfied?
15. Can you show me 3-4 houses before I commit to working with you to see your style?
16. Do you screen homes for me?
17. Will you be showing me houses or do you have a showing agent that does that?
18. When I get my offer accepted do I continue to work with you or will I be passed on to a transaction coordinator?
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Old 03-25-2018, 08:42 PM
 
6,368 posts, read 7,373,471 times
Reputation: 10833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thundarr457 View Post
Contrary to what has been said on here I don't hate agents. I am trying to help buyers so they don't go through what we went through. For those who actually missed my post I will boil it down to a few paragraphs:

1. Many online agent reviews are meaningless. When you see too many five star reviews for an agent you should take it with a grain of salt. I looked on online and almost EVERYONE has 5 stars. The worst agent has a 3.9 and a few between 4.5 and 4.9 and the rest (90%) are 5 stars. Are these objective?

2. Teams. Many agents are part of a "team'. In my experience there are some "super agents" out there with fabulous websites, videos and many millions in sales. I said to myself "this is the agent for me". Did I get talk to or even meet that agent NOOOO. I got a "team member" who in my cases were new to the business (less than 2 years) and not very good. I understand some of those super agents want to deal with high net value customers and not waste time with low end sales, and it is totally understandable. People should realize this going in.

3. Referrals - I had experience where my local agent referred me to another agent in the area I was looking in. The agent I was referred to was fabulous and one of the best agents I have ever run across as well a extremely nice person. I still get birthday and Christmas Cards from them and they have 2 online reviews (both 5 stars which they more than deserve). That same agent referred me to another agent which they had met at a gathering. That agent turned out to be the WORST agent I have ever met and put me through hell. My point is, referring agents may or may not know the agent you are getting referred to or know them very well. They also have to share a portion of a commission, if it results in a sale. Some agents are happy with a referral and others are less than thrilled about splitting a commission. This is just something for prospective buyers to be aware of.

4. How to find a good agent. There are plenty of them out there. My best advice, if you are able to, is to go to a bunch of open houses and meet agents there. We met a fabulous agent who I overheard talking to a buyer and was very impressed. They turned out to be the agent that found us our home and was invaluable throughout the whole process. Feel free to quiz your prospective agent about things that you may want to know about like: are they full time?, how long have they been at it? Is this a career or something you do part time? how many houses have you sold? how long have you been in the area? do you live in the area I am looking at and if so how long? You can try asking on this forum, but I had terrible luck with the two agents that offered to help us through a PM.

5. Do you need an agent for a new build. I would say most likely. It costs you nothing (the builder pays for it) and if you can find an agent that is familiar with building and add-ons, it can be a tremendous help. I have met both kinds, one managed to save buyers a bundle and actually negotiate better prices plus advise what to do now and what to do later. Another dropped us at the sales office and was no help whatsoever and turned out to be a massive hindrance talking us into buying a house that was not right for us when we had major reservations.

Here is my advice for a prospective buyer:

Do your homework. There are many online sites where you can see houses with pictures, maps, sales and tax data, how long the house has been on the market, what neighboring houses are worth or went for. This is an invaluable resource. Before you go on a tour look up the house and see if it interests you. Its good to see houses regardless, just to get the feel for the area. Your agent will be more than happy to show you around plus the high points of the area. You cannot view many of these houses without an agent so they are necessary. Its also good to go to open houses where you will find a mixture of agents looking for prospective new buyers plus its also a way to drive traffic through a listing and keep the seller happy. Depend on yourself before making one of the biggest financial decisions of your life. You will be the one living there.
I have no problem with what you have posted. It's just the repetitive nature of your threads that many find annoying. I do hope that you're not planning a sequel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thundarr457 View Post
Good Luck. I will post no more in this forum.
You posted this earlier today. I guess that didn't last too long. Welcome back.
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Old 03-25-2018, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
31,698 posts, read 55,551,116 times
Reputation: 30277
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thundarr457 View Post
...I had terrible luck with the two agents that offered to help us through a PM.
...
That they solicited you via PM here was your first red flag.

Verboten.
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Old 03-25-2018, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Raleigh NC
7,842 posts, read 6,194,494 times
Reputation: 6952
In general, what you've now posted is really good advice/input. A few clarifications from you here and there. A few minor corrections perhaps. But all in all, good stuff.
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