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Old 03-27-2018, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Saint John, IN
10,642 posts, read 3,324,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoulJourn View Post
You think WRONG.
I agree, NOT wrong. If it's not in a completely bad area, with bad schools, than it would need a lot of work!
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Old 03-27-2018, 02:32 PM
 
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I saw an article that said this town in Indiana is one of the best cheap small towns to live

https://www.realtor.com/realestatean...sport_IN/sby-1
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Old 03-27-2018, 02:37 PM
 
10,274 posts, read 6,515,435 times
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Originally Posted by dontaskwhy View Post
Not necessarily. I live in North Central Florida and you can buy a home in that price range that are not bad at all. There are still short sale and foreclosures waiting to be bought and they are all not bad.
I am glad to hear they are still out there because they are gone from SW Florida where you used to be able to get one a few years ago. I think I got the last cheaper house in my area. Now older decent shape mobile homes on private land sell for 30% more than I paid for my home 2 years later.

Price increases will probably spread north too. If I didn't find anything here i was gonna search further north but I hate any cold weather and 40 degree mornings make me miserable.
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Old 03-27-2018, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Saint John, IN
10,642 posts, read 3,324,377 times
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Inventory, sure; however, all of these are foreclosures and really bad! They will probably sell more than list and will need thousands in work. Plus the schools are bad!


OP, you're better off getting a condo or a townhouse in a good area and then get a SF home when you can spend more. You can get a decent house in a decent area at $100k and have lots of locations to choose from!
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Old 03-27-2018, 02:47 PM
 
6,155 posts, read 3,285,841 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schmooky View Post
Well put another way, our temporary home is in the nicest suburb of Dayton, and a 4/2 ranch on a quiet cul de sac, with some of the best schools in the state. We bought it for under 200k, and a comparable home in, say, Chattanooga was priced similarly (we looked at jobs there too). But either way, we moved here from out of state for a very well paying job and love the area. The inner city area of Dayton has a lot of aging real estate and was hit hard in the recession, but itís far from a hole even in those spots. The schools are the real issue and I know theyíre actually pulling themselves back out very well with remedial reading and math programs, but itís a slow statistic to change.

It is one of the most undersold areas Iíve ever been in my life. The quality of life for the salary here is excellent, especially if youíre willing to spend closer to 100k for the better school districts. But if you donít have kids it makes little difference. This area is way less ghetto than where I used to live in California, despite the prices being quintuple for the same house and worse school districts there.

Springfield, too, has a whole lot to offer someone with little money to plunk down. Theyíre both recovering and on the mend.
I moved from Huber Heights(northeast Dayton burb) to southwest WA. Purchased Huber home for $106k in 2003 and sold it for $107k in 2015. Friend who moved to Texas in '03 and sold his home after a similar amount of time got an extra $100k cash from appreciation. There's a real opportunity cost to living in such a stagnant real estate market. Purchased our house here less than 2 years ago and it has already grown from $250k to $300k.

The kicker? Property taxes were higher there for my $106k house than they are for my $300k house here. Then there's the city and state income taxes. Tax savings alone more than paid for the cost of living difference.

What really puzzled me though is why new construction homes in Dayton cost pretty much the same as they do here.
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Old 03-27-2018, 02:50 PM
 
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And the property taxes are insane. The $15,000 house in Dayton has property taxes of $1,000 per year. At that rate my house would have property taxes of about $30,000. My property taxes are less than $4,000 a year.

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2...?fullpage=true

The $32,000 house in Springfield has property taxes of $2,200 per year. At that rate, a $320,000 home in my neck of the woods would have property taxes of $22,000. A $320,000 home where I live has property taxes of about $3,200.

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2...?fullpage=true

Seems to me the local yokels are taking the owners of lower priced homes for a ride.
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Old 03-27-2018, 03:34 PM
 
Location: The middle
470 posts, read 227,140 times
Reputation: 1636
Evansville, IN

Huachuca City, AZ

Alamogordo, NM

Olean, NY

There are many more small towns all over the mid west, south, southwest, western NY, the southern tier of NY and PA that have liveable houses under 50,000. They will most likely be dated and jobs, schools and healthcare might be iffy but they are out there.
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Old 03-27-2018, 03:42 PM
 
931 posts, read 405,684 times
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Getting off on a tangent but oh well

Property taxes are high compared to incomes but they get you one way or another. I’d recommend Greene or Warren county over Montgomery for that; but our taxes in Centerville for that temp house are actually LOWER than our Xenia rental.

The property taxes aren’t too insane - the house we are building will probably value in at 800k or so. In Greene, at least, our property taxes yearly are expected to be around $8500 based on that value. They’re high, but not higher than I paid in Alaska or California, certainly.

And CGab, not all of those are foreclosures. It’s just that there is a glut of pre and post war small cape cods and ranches, and the school districts aren’t fantastic. So older homeowners are trying to sell and younger families are sticking to better burbs or the nicer parts of downtown. The prices are rather stagnant, but wages aren’t. We’ve been here less than a year and already seen about a 4% raise in salary, alone. Investing in real estate here only makes sense from a landlording persoective, but in terms of what the OP wanted - just finding a good place to live for dirt cheap - it’s very doable and the local economy can’t find enough qualified, sober workers to fill positions right now. You’re not going to get ahead in appreciation except in places like Beavercreek, Bellbrook, Oregon district, and Centerville, but there are jobs and the cost of living is low compared to the salaries in the region, and it’s a fine place to raise a family.

I came from San Diego and then Anchorage. And for us? Dayton/Cincy and Columbus are actually far better places to live. Really. I miss the coast but I’ve been so pleasantly surprised to find the Midwest love after having moved here. It gets undersold HARD.
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Old 03-27-2018, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Saint John, IN
10,642 posts, read 3,324,377 times
Reputation: 12748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gingercoyote View Post
Evansville, IN

Huachuca City, AZ

Alamogordo, NM

Olean, NY

There are many more small towns all over the mid west, south, southwest, western NY, the southern tier of NY and PA that have liveable houses under 50,000. They will most likely be dated and jobs, schools and healthcare might be iffy but they are out there.


Indiana's property taxes are also capped at 1% assessed property value.
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Old 03-27-2018, 03:57 PM
 
4,211 posts, read 4,563,416 times
Reputation: 3619
Detroit and Toledo for sure!
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