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Old 03-30-2018, 09:24 PM
 
Location: northern va
1,555 posts, read 1,992,571 times
Reputation: 1328

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I'm glad to find out consumers (and some agents apparently) would prefer I just be an agent and stand there silently while the inspector they found and hired misses things that are obvious.
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Old 03-30-2018, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Athol, Idaho
2,182 posts, read 1,055,031 times
Reputation: 3184
I still want to know what specific thing Mike is talking about but doesn't want to tell me.

If the inspector missed it or in Mikes case left it off to spite Mike and the buyer knew about it they can still ask for whatever it was to be repaired. I want to know. Did they?
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Old 03-30-2018, 09:40 PM
 
Location: northern va
1,555 posts, read 1,992,571 times
Reputation: 1328
Quote:
Originally Posted by I love boots. View Post
I still want to know what specific thing Mike is talking about but doesn't want to tell me.

If the inspector missed it or in Mikes case left it off to spite Mike and the buyer knew about it they can still ask for whatever it was to be repaired. I want to know. Did they?
If you're talking about post #67, I'm not sure it matters the circumstance. I take it that Mike is saying that if he sees something at an inspection, should he not say something?
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Old 03-30-2018, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Athol, Idaho
2,182 posts, read 1,055,031 times
Reputation: 3184
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
Not at all. The materiality of the item is unchanged, and my fiduciary responsibilities demand that I disclose what I discover.
Fundamental, legally and ethically.

So, you would withhold information rather than share.
I would not.
You are responsible to disclose what you know to the buyer. So is the seller. Did the seller disclose it to the buyer? If I represent the seller I would require that they fill out the property disclosure with all material facts on it, including what I know. The buyer gets this at inspection regardless what in in the inspection report. You don't need to make demands of the inspector in order to disclose something.
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Old 03-30-2018, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Athol, Idaho
2,182 posts, read 1,055,031 times
Reputation: 3184
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherifftruman View Post
The first thing I ask my client and their agent is if they have seen anything they’re specifically concerned with or had seen. Why not take advantage of an extra set of eyes that’s been there. Though for sure, in my area right now, they’ve definitely not been in the house very long before. People are seeing houses for 15 minutes and putting in an offer.
And I would answer as I'm sure the buyer would also. I wouldn't tell you what to put in your report. Or follow you around and be a pain.
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Old 03-30-2018, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Athol, Idaho
2,182 posts, read 1,055,031 times
Reputation: 3184
Quote:
Originally Posted by kww View Post
If you're talking about post #67, I'm not sure it matters the circumstance. I take it that Mike is saying that if he sees something at an inspection, should he not say something?
It does to me. Has anyone here ever done a transaction where repairs were asked for that weren't on the report? I have. I want to know if whatever it was was addressed or not.
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Old 03-30-2018, 10:15 PM
 
Location: Raleigh NC
7,749 posts, read 6,110,007 times
Reputation: 6867
if an inspector is allowed to test/observe a "representative number" of something - windows that open, outlets that function are good examples - to satisfy their requirement, but an agent tests all windows or all outlets and finds something amiss.

If an inspector is allowed to say "couldn't inspect because of personal belongings in the way" and an agent takes it upon themselves to move the personal belongings.

there are numerous instances that happen. It's too bad that one person has made it undesirable to discuss in more depth. It doesn't give REAL consumers who have questions the answers they actually seek and need.

When needed, I discuss these things with MY clients. It's one thing they get when they hire ME that isn't on a piece of paper, but benefits them from my long tenure of experience and attending too many inspections to count.
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Old 03-30-2018, 10:31 PM
 
1,511 posts, read 563,734 times
Reputation: 2944
Quote:
Originally Posted by I love boots. View Post
It does to me. Has anyone here ever done a transaction where repairs were asked for that weren't on the report? I have. I want to know if whatever it was was addressed or not.
Oh hell yes. As a buyer and a seller.

1. I asked for a seller to repair (level and fill) a flagstone patio.

2. As a seller, I had a buyer that noted the master shower was plumbed backwards. I had never noticed it - but it was.

3. Asked a seller to repair/replace the pump in a jetted tub that wasn’t functional.

4. Had to get a builder to put in a handrail to meet building code on a stairway off a cement patio, as the drop was over 18”

None of those cases were noted in the inspection.

On 1,3, I settled for a reduced price.

2. I got a plumber out to fix it.

4. Builder installed a handrail.
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Old 03-30-2018, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Athol, Idaho
2,182 posts, read 1,055,031 times
Reputation: 3184
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoamingTX View Post
Oh hell yes. As a buyer and a seller.

1. I asked for a seller to repair (level and fill) a flagstone patio.

2. As a seller, I had a buyer that noted the master shower was plumbed backwards. I had never noticed it - but it was.

3. Asked a seller to repair/replace the pump in a jetted tub that wasn’t functional.

4. Had to get a builder to put in a handrail to meet building code on a stairway off a cement patio, as the drop was over 18”

None of those cases were noted in the inspection.

On 1,3, I settled for a reduced price.

2. I got a plumber out to fix it.

4. Builder installed a handrail.
I wasn't allowed to rep you again.
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Old 03-31-2018, 02:59 AM
 
1,528 posts, read 724,410 times
Reputation: 2062
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Hoffman View Post
So to sum this thread up, the recommendations are usually as good as the agent. Some agents have higher standards and more experience than others.

For Boots and JB, I have flipped houses. I have observed hundreds, maybe over 1000 of various kinds of inspections. I've negotiated hundreds of repair addendums. I'm not an inspector but I know what they look for and how to identify many visible issues because of that experience. I'm not a contractor but I know how to fix things and how much it should cost. I always point out issues I see that can be red flags or that I know will come up inspections. I talk about repair cost and renovation expenses. That's why people hire me and that's why they trust me. I even advise buyers of what they should ask for to be repaired at a minimum! I don't understand why someone would withhold that info or why others would expect an agent to withhold that info. I'm not ashamed to say I'm an expert. But hey, if a consumer want "just an agent", there are plenty of those out there.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoBromhal View Post
if an inspector is allowed to test/observe a "representative number" of something - windows that open, outlets that function are good examples - to satisfy their requirement, but an agent tests all windows or all outlets and finds something amiss.

If an inspector is allowed to say "couldn't inspect because of personal belongings in the way" and an agent takes it upon themselves to move the personal belongings.

there are numerous instances that happen. It's too bad that one person has made it undesirable to discuss in more depth. It doesn't give REAL consumers who have questions the answers they actually seek and need.

When needed, I discuss these things with MY clients. It's one thing they get when they hire ME that isn't on a piece of paper, but benefits them from my long tenure of experience and attending too many inspections to count.
So we have one agent who is labeling himself as an 'expert' - in this context presumably he means on evaluating the home's condition? Or something to do with the home's condition? If you are getting consumers to hire you based on you having some kind of expertise in evaluating a home's condition, then I think that's dangerous. You can easily find yourself liable when things go wrong.

And another agent who actually inspects things. Are you qualified in any way to conduct inspections? An inspection is not a matter of looking around and noting what you happen to see as some kind of 'value add'. If you start inspecting stuff, you find yourself responsible for it.

Anyway, I have no problem with an agent pointing something out to an inspector. For example, before the inspection begins, the agent mentions a few things - e.g. I'm concerned that the porch does not appear to be level.

What has created red flags for me is when an agent is talking about how their recommendations depend on the inspector agreeing to be influenced by that agent in terms of the content of his report. The example given was about not including something that the agent spotted. But the issue is with the influence. Mike described a dynamic where he is influencing the content of the report and holding future recommendations over the inspector's head, even if just tacitly. With the inspector that beholden to the agent, it can create a dynamic where the inspector behaves differently. Instead of creating an atmosphere where the agent encourages the inspector to do his job with independence, he creates one of increased control, influence and feeling that the inspector is beholden to him. Big red flags for me with this practice. Maybe Mike also likes things to be described in a certain way on the report. I'm not saying there is anything specifically wrong as we don't know the details. I'm saying that this kind of language is a red flag to me and from his words, I'm very concerned that the dynamic and atmosphere created during the inspection is not the right one. If the agent is following the inspector around and tacitly or explicitly hanging future recommendations on the content of the report, then that's a big issue for me.
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