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Old 04-05-2018, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Cape Coral
4 posts, read 1,199 times
Reputation: 15

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If your not handy you want to stay away from any home no matter age that needs a lot of repairs. I've always bought older homes as I feel they are many times built better the some new construction homes I've looked at. Many times you will find an older home that has been updated to newer standards also.

Buy what you feel you will be most comfortable in and fits your lifestyle.
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Old 04-05-2018, 09:25 AM
 
4,497 posts, read 6,149,250 times
Reputation: 4016
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
With it being virtually a requirement when a home sells the competition among the underground trenchless sewer companies is intense... prices have fallen as more get into the sewer lateral business.

I had mine done and it was $3200... what helped is I had everything ready and used my Backhoe to expose the city sewer line.. the reason I did not simply dig it all was a driveway and patio was over the line.

The trenchless is standard operation here... very little disturbance and seamless heat welded line goes in right behind the bursting cone... 1 or 2 days max for a 100' of line is typical.

Mine was 80' with a 3 man crew and took 7.5 hours... figure 2k for labor and materials...
Worst sewer story I’ve heard recently: hearing this second hand so some details may be off.
My daughters friend bought a beautiful old home, had it inspected. Seller disclosed minor problems with sewer line and kicked in several thousand for fixing.
Sewer line is now in imminent danger of total collapse. Seller knew but didn’t disclose. They’ve also found proof that the guy who inspected the sewer knew the previous owner and also knew the major problems existed and lied.
Sewer Lateral is UNDER the neighbors new garage. Why the city allowed them to build there is unknown.
Huge problem and lawyers are now involved.
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Old 04-05-2018, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
13,018 posts, read 7,193,418 times
Reputation: 49955
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
Interesting note about construction and windows - the entire downstairs of my house has the original windows. The front door is massive, quarter sawn oak and beveled glass. One of the dining room windows is ornamental, stained glass with the initial of the first home owner (coincidentally, the same as my maiden name) incorporated into the design.

ALL of these windows are almost 100 years old. They were never replaced, but they were well maintained. We have no issues with drafts, heat, cold or hot spots. Yes, we have CAC - as the house was maintained over the years. The sunroom is cool in the summer.

In the master bedroom and the second largest bedroom, the windows were replaced with thermo-pane windows - we are guessing sometime in the late 1990s - early 00s. It's a brand you have heard of, I am sure.

In winter storms, the windows rattle and there are drafts. We live in Northern OH. So this is a big deal.

The old windows were fine the way they were. Our guess is that someone convinced the homeowner that he had to "upgrade".

That's incredibly sad about your windows sheena and incredibly cool about your stained glass window. Our windows are from 1911 and have that beautiful old wavy glass. They leak like crazy but we made interior storm windows for them. We also insulated the walls upstairs and house wrapped. Our average heat bill was around 250 dollars a month and we are now down to 140 a month for the below zero coldest month to 85 dollars a month for average temps. It breaks my heart to see a beautiful old house with vinyl windows. You can replace them with wood reproductions. It's pricey but it may be worth it. Your house sounds amazing.
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Old 04-05-2018, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Columbia SC
7,944 posts, read 6,706,083 times
Reputation: 10701
Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
I would look at more along the features the house has and I want versus its age. As an example any home I buy must have central air and preferably gas heat. Two car garage, big windows for plenty of light, hardwood floor except in bedrooms, master bath large shower, private toilet room, roomy kitchen for some (not me though), etc.

If it does not have the feature I want, I do not want it no matter when it was built.
ADD ON

My last two homes were new builds. I want what I want, the way I want it, and when I want it. I could only get all this with new builds.
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Old 04-05-2018, 10:46 AM
 
4,497 posts, read 6,149,250 times
Reputation: 4016
Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
ADD ON

My last two homes were new builds. I want what I want, the way I want it, and when I want it. I could only get all this with new builds.
I can understand that. We might have done that but we were in a hurry and wanted to be in a specific urban neighborhood so it would have involved buying an existing house and demolishing it. Not a good use of time or funds although our next door neighbor did just that.
We ended up with a 1987 northwest contemporary that a builder built as his own home. Weird thing is, itís clearly a custom home but it appeared that someone ran out of money toward the end so cut corners on the finishing work. Very beautifully built and solid and light and bright and sunny.

So we bought it and ripped it apart while we lived in the master suite.
Now itís pretty much exactly what we wanted.

I LOVE old houses. I love looking at them and visiting them and all of that. But I like living in homes that are sunlit and airy. Couldnít really find an old one here like that.
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Old 04-05-2018, 11:04 AM
 
3,583 posts, read 1,507,792 times
Reputation: 9839
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistyriver View Post
But I like living in homes that are sunlit and airy. Couldnít really find an old one here like that.
Really?

My old house built 1939 has multiple 7 foot high windows.
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Old 04-05-2018, 11:20 AM
 
6,098 posts, read 3,256,743 times
Reputation: 8327
Likely more of a local issue, but here in the Portland metro area a lot of the old housing stock is in the form of cute little bungalows with just one bathroom(and not enough lot size to add-on) and doorways/stairwells/attic bonus rooms so short I have to duck to get through them(I'm 6'7).
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Old 04-05-2018, 12:02 PM
 
4,497 posts, read 6,149,250 times
Reputation: 4016
Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
Really?

My old house built 1939 has multiple 7 foot high windows.
Yes, really. None of the old houses in the area we were looking in were light and airy. At that time. Itís not an indictment of all old houses...just the ones available when we were looking.

Except when I say we were looking for old houses, Iím talking about over 100 years old. And they donít generally have the very high ceilings that I ultimately decided I loved that contribute to that feeling of lightness and airiness.

My daughter has a 1940 bungalow with big windows as well.
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Old 04-05-2018, 12:03 PM
 
4,497 posts, read 6,149,250 times
Reputation: 4016
Quote:
Originally Posted by notnamed View Post
Likely more of a local issue, but here in the Portland metro area a lot of the old housing stock is in the form of cute little bungalows with just one bathroom(and not enough lot size to add-on) and doorways/stairwells/attic bonus rooms so short I have to duck to get through them(I'm 6'7).
Iíll bet. My husband is 6í2Ē and he felt a little cramped in some stairwells.
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Old 04-05-2018, 01:36 PM
 
25,800 posts, read 49,685,561 times
Reputation: 19238
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistyriver View Post
Worst sewer story Iíve heard recently: hearing this second hand so some details may be off.
My daughters friend bought a beautiful old home, had it inspected. Seller disclosed minor problems with sewer line and kicked in several thousand for fixing.
Sewer line is now in imminent danger of total collapse. Seller knew but didnít disclose. Theyíve also found proof that the guy who inspected the sewer knew the previous owner and also knew the major problems existed and lied.
Sewer Lateral is UNDER the neighbors new garage. Why the city allowed them to build there is unknown.
Huge problem and lawyers are now involved.
Not all that uncommon in older areas... I have a garage that is directly over a city neighborhood water line...

Someone goofed when the line was platted and missed by 90 feet... said 10 but is 100 from property line... still glad to have the garage.

Friends had a home in expensive Santa Clara... the rear of the home was settling so they hired and engineer and the best plan was to shore up the home with pressurized grout... the cement trucks arrived and they started pumping... and they ordered a second truck and called it good... a few hours later man hole covers are being lifted by flowing sewage in the street... the city line was partially collapsed and had been undermining the slab...

Turns out the line was in the wrong place... lawyers got involved and at first the city was going to sue the property owner and contractor... when it was all said and done the city had to pay for everything... thankfully the contractor followed all applicable law and had property permits.
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