U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-09-2018, 05:10 PM
Status: "Summer, please don't leave!" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Asheville, NC
11,465 posts, read 25,689,905 times
Reputation: 4201

Advertisements

So, what's the deal with these hybrid modulars? Clayton claims to build a modular on a frame. I know people say it's a double wide (manufactured home) then. But, if the standards are the same as a stick built home, why isn't it considered a modular even though it's on a frame? The HUD standards on a manufactured home are definitely different than a modular. Modulars are built to UBC or IBC code. I certainly know the difference between a manufactured home and a modular.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-09-2018, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
31,590 posts, read 55,295,005 times
Reputation: 30145
Don't do it.

It is a goosed-up manufactured home built to slide into areas where manufactured homes are not allowed by zoning.
"Built to residential codes," rather than "HUD Code." But, on a HUD-Code assembly line.

The biggest quibble with on-frame mods?
They have to have a cambered frame to carry the load down the road. That makes it very difficult to produce a tight, square product.
Go conventional mod or go doublewide.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-09-2018, 08:21 PM
Status: "Summer, please don't leave!" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Asheville, NC
11,465 posts, read 25,689,905 times
Reputation: 4201
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
Don't do it.

It is a goosed-up manufactured home built to slide into areas where manufactured homes are not allowed by zoning.
"Built to residential codes," rather than "HUD Code." But, on a HUD-Code assembly line.

The biggest quibble with on-frame mods?
They have to have a cambered frame to carry the load down the road. That makes it very difficult to produce a tight, square product.
Go conventional mod or go doublewide.
Mike, I knew you'd have the answer Do you mean a square product when they assemble it? (Potential for leaks and gaps?) It would be a used Clayton from 2004 so it would have to be disassembled. My friends are getting a good price on it but from what you are saying, it's still not a good idea? I also read that even though they are modulars, because they are on frame, they are appraised like a double wide. Is that true?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-09-2018, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
31,590 posts, read 55,295,005 times
Reputation: 30145
Quote:
Originally Posted by beckycat View Post
Mike, I knew you'd have the answer Do you mean a square product when they assemble it? (Potential for leaks and gaps?) It would be a used Clayton from 2004 so it would have to be disassembled. My friends are getting a good price on it but from what you are saying, it's still not a good idea? I also read that even though they are modulars, because they are on frame, they are appraised like a double wide. Is that true?
I don't know about appraisal.
But, if they are getting a great price on the unit, that helps a lot.

"Camber" is the curvature they weld into the frame, so the structure levels out the frame as the weight of the house is added.
It also helps the frame carry the house down the road without collapsing. Puts a spring into the frame.
By it's nature, camber makes it hard to build a square unit.
Getting a good deal on a used unit in good condition might be better than buying new.
Tear down, transport, and proper installation at a new site can make or break the deal, though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2018, 07:19 AM
Status: "Summer, please don't leave!" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Asheville, NC
11,465 posts, read 25,689,905 times
Reputation: 4201
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
I don't know about appraisal.
But, if they are getting a great price on the unit, that helps a lot.

"Camber" is the curvature they weld into the frame, so the structure levels out the frame as the weight of the house is added.
It also helps the frame carry the house down the road without collapsing. Puts a spring into the frame.
By it's nature, camber makes it hard to build a square unit.
Getting a good deal on a used unit in good condition might be better than buying new.
Tear down, transport, and proper installation at a new site can make or break the deal, though.
Thanks for explaining that Mike. They can't have a double wide on the land. The unit is in good condition and the kitchen and living areas have been remodeled. The one bathroom and laundry need to be finished. It has higher ceilings too and the peak of the roof looks like a traditional ranch home. It's a 28x56 and they agreed to about $40 sq ft. It only needs to be moved less than 10 mi. They believe it puts them in budget where they need to be. Buying new is not an option due to cost. It's not too often that used modulars come for sale. Where they bought land, it's very pricey to own a home. ($200+ sq ft) The county considers the home a stick built since it's a modular and not manufactured. I just wonder once it comes to appraisal time to sell or refinance how that will affect it?

Last edited by beckycat; 04-10-2018 at 07:54 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2018, 09:50 PM
Status: "Summer, please don't leave!" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Asheville, NC
11,465 posts, read 25,689,905 times
Reputation: 4201
When they disassemble these homes and then put them back together, do they always join properly? Can there be any issues from transportation with it not going back together properly?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2018, 04:02 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
31,590 posts, read 55,295,005 times
Reputation: 30145
Quote:
Originally Posted by beckycat View Post
When they disassemble these homes and then put them back together, do they always join properly? Can there be any issues from transportation with it not going back together properly?
There are numerous questions.
This can be quite a project if the home was assembled as a permanent installation.

If the units fit well when first assembled, and are separated cleanly, they should go back together well.
A 10 mile move shouldn't be a big deal, particularly if the transport driver shows any level of care.
I would expect some sheetrock repairs, door adjustments, and the like.

When you refer to the roof as looking "like a traditional ranch home," that makes me think it is a hinged truss that will have to be lowered for transport and raised at set up.
Someone had better know what they are doing, and design and original installation method might make it more difficult. I would expect some unavoidable damage to trusses or other framing members as the units are separated. The skill of the contractor will be very important to minimize that damage, and to assure solid set up at the other end.
And, tarping the roof well is extremely important to keep the interior dry during the move and re-set.

Do the owners have the hitches and axles? If not, they will be an added expense.

Have they talked to a couple of experienced contractors who will tear down, transport, and set up? Have they received quotes for that service?
If someone says "$25,000+," I would not be surprised.
Will the county inspect the set up, and demand either the original set up manual instructions, or an engineer's sign off on the final set up?
How will they finance the deal? Do they have a lender who will finance such a project?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2018, 09:56 AM
Status: "Summer, please don't leave!" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Asheville, NC
11,465 posts, read 25,689,905 times
Reputation: 4201
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
There are numerous questions.
This can be quite a project if the home was assembled as a permanent installation.

If the units fit well when first assembled, and are separated cleanly, they should go back together well.
A 10 mile move shouldn't be a big deal, particularly if the transport driver shows any level of care.
I would expect some sheetrock repairs, door adjustments, and the like.

When you refer to the roof as looking "like a traditional ranch home," that makes me think it is a hinged truss that will have to be lowered for transport and raised at set up.
Someone had better know what they are doing, and design and original installation method might make it more difficult. I would expect some unavoidable damage to trusses or other framing members as the units are separated. The skill of the contractor will be very important to minimize that damage, and to assure solid set up at the other end.
And, tarping the roof well is extremely important to keep the interior dry during the move and re-set.

Do the owners have the hitches and axles? If not, they will be an added expense.

Have they talked to a couple of experienced contractors who will tear down, transport, and set up? Have they received quotes for that service?
If someone says "$25,000+," I would not be surprised.
Will the county inspect the set up, and demand either the original set up manual instructions, or an engineer's sign off on the final set up?
How will they finance the deal? Do they have a lender who will finance such a project?
Mike,

These definitely are some important questions. They were quoted $5000 to separate it, transport it and put it back together. That did not include fixing any siding, shingles, etc. I also thought about the flooring inside. It's just been remodeled with new laminate flooring. Aren't the going to have to tear that apart as well? I know they are talking with the county. To me, it can end up being more than anticipated and costing much more from what you are saying. I will attach a picture for you to see it.
Attached Thumbnails
On frame modular homes-modular.jpg  
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2018, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
31,590 posts, read 55,295,005 times
Reputation: 30145
$5000 sounds low to me, Becky.
I would want a clear contract, with all terms spelled out.

To get the full package turnkey? My $25,000 may have been low, too.

And, they surely better talk to the county about the permitting process.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2018, 05:10 PM
Status: "Summer, please don't leave!" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Asheville, NC
11,465 posts, read 25,689,905 times
Reputation: 4201
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
$5000 sounds low to me, Becky.
I would want a clear contract, with all terms spelled out.

To get the full package turnkey? My $25,000 may have been low, too.

And, they surely better talk to the county about the permitting process.
Well, they called Clayton Homes today with a serial number and found out the home is a HUD home. The sellers are advertising it as an on frame modular. The seller's said it's definitely a modular because of zoning where it is. My friends had a contractor set up to look at it for an accurate estimate to be turn key but have since cancelled now they found out it's a goosed-up double wide. It was a nice looking home though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top