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Old 04-15-2018, 07:01 AM
 
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I'm in CT with the strictest asbestos laws in the country so I know the laws vary by state.

Call around and ask what disposal fees are. You also have to check the mastic used to glue it down. A good contractor doing the remodel won't bat an eye over this.
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Old 04-15-2018, 08:46 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rrah View Post
Have you bothered to look at any of the legitimate sources on when asbestos is dangerous? Millions of us grew up in homes from the 1960's and earlier that contained asbestos tiles. Heck, all the bedrooms in my childhood home had what was probably asbestos tile. Asbestos is dangerous when it's friable. Tiles covered by carpet is probably not damaged.

I'm curious--did the inspector actually send away a sample of the tile? The ONLY tell if it's actually asbestos is to send it out for testing. He can make an educated guess and that's it.
If itís 9x9 itís basically guaranteed to be asbestos tile. The black mastic is also asbestos material. No need to test it. I owned a rental with asbestos tile. I called a demo contractor and gutted the house. That was the end of the asbestos in that house. Remodeled and rerented. If you like the house I wouldnít let asbestos stop me from buying. There are plenty of ways to abate or encapsulate.
If youíre that worried about it put some steel mesh down and pour a slab of concrete over it.



Quote:
Originally Posted by mike1003 View Post
Having known several people who died of mesothelioma, it is definitely a deal breaker for me.

Unless you can get the owners to pay for the asbestos remediation, walk away
It requires prolonged exposure to huge amounts of asbestos fibers to get to that point. Youíre not getting it from a floor tile. Unless youíre planning to grind it up and snorting it. There are asbestos fibers floating around everywhere in the air. Itís a natural mineral.
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Old 04-15-2018, 10:59 AM
 
10,403 posts, read 7,483,693 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Electrician4you View Post
If it’s 9x9 it’s basically guaranteed to be asbestos tile. The black mastic is also asbestos material. No need to test it. I owned a rental with asbestos tile. I called a demo contractor and gutted the house. That was the end of the asbestos in that house. Remodeled and rerented. If you like the house I wouldn’t let asbestos stop me from buying. There are plenty of ways to abate or encapsulate.
If you’re that worried about it put some steel mesh down and pour a slab of concrete over it.





It requires prolonged exposure to huge amounts of asbestos fibers to get to that point. You’re not getting it from a floor tile. Unless you’re planning to grind it up and snorting it. There are asbestos fibers floating around everywhere in the air. It’s a natural mineral.
I'll agree to disagree with you on the highlighted points. Even one fiber can wreak havoc on your body. They're so infinitesimal. Even compared to a human hair.

Yes, it's natural but it has to be mined and it's illegal in all but 3 countries in the world, the US being one of them. Thankfully it's not floating around everywhere. That doesn't even make sense.
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Old 04-15-2018, 11:10 AM
 
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No, It would not. Anymore than lead paint or radon warnings. I'd prefer an old house - probably better built. I wonder if all those square tiles, popular in the 60's that my parents installed, contained asbestos. Years later, they ripped it all up - themselves.
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Old 04-15-2018, 11:42 AM
 
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If its late 50's to early 70's its got asbestos or had it. Doubtful its the really harmful kind, that's the blown insulation that looks like barbed wire in a microscope. Cheapest form of abatement is to seal it with a polymer or solid covering and then lay a new floor on top. If you want to test get a medical mask, putty knife, and plastic bag and take a sample and send it to a testing lab. Costs less than $50. That will tell you type and overall asbestos content. Getting flooring up is easy, its the glue/mastic that's expensive if you want to do that. For that reason lots of people pull the tiles up and encapsulate the mastic.

Abatement cost can vary significantly based on where you live and the "point count" of the material. The lower the asbestos content in the material the less stringent the measures you have to take for safety and disposal.
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Old 04-15-2018, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
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If you ever rent the house, in many states it must be disclosed to the renter that there's asbestos.
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Old 04-16-2018, 06:27 AM
 
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Good grief. Asbestos is stable and doesn't spread into the air by having it in floor tiles unless you start grinding it. Neither does lead paint on a wall cause a problem unless you start eating it. People are so paranoid.
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Old 04-18-2018, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
24,720 posts, read 59,615,271 times
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We had red and white composite tile from the 1940s in a former house. We never had it tested, but suspected it might contain asbestos. We just clear coated it. It was pretty and holds up really well. When we went to sell it, the realtor had us put carpet over it. She said we technically did not need to disclose it since it had never been tested and we did not know whether it was asbestos. We disclosed it anyway simply saying there is old composite tile under the carpet that we had not tested, I do not remember whether it went on the disclosure sheet but we discussed it. The realtors may have insisted it no be included since it was not tested and it might set off the lenders. They did not want unknowns included in the disclosures. I know there were some issues that were like that.

No one seemed to care. The buyer ended up removing the carpet we put in at our realtor's behest and clear coating the tile again. He thought it was cool. Four owners later, we visited and got invited inside. The tile was covered with carpeting again. They said it was still under there. They thought it was cool, but wanted warmer feet. They left it there because the next buyer might want it. As far as they knew no one had ever bothered to test it.

Incidentally we did some research to try to figure out how likely it was that the tiles contained asbestos. We discovered it was more likely to have asbestos in the glue than in the tile.

Last edited by Coldjensens; 04-18-2018 at 08:57 AM..
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Old 04-18-2018, 09:17 AM
 
3,472 posts, read 1,986,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CT356 View Post
The inspector said he thought it should be removed if we remodel the area, which makes sense since there's a good chance someone would drill or nail into it. We would, of course, have the pros handle the removal.

If you have it professionally removed, do you need to disclose that it was ever there or does the professional removal negate having to disclose anything at a later date?
Call up an asbestos removed and get an idea of the cost to remove x sqft of basement floor tiles. Then you'll know.

I am fairly certain the laminated flooring in the kitchen was laid down over asbestos tiles when they renovated 10 years before we bought our house. It's a 1948 house, but who knows anout the hidden flooring?

People get over worked up about lead paint, mold, asbestos etc because companies charge so much to remove it and tv shows make it mandatory to spend the $1m to remove a 5 sqft section!!

You need to deal with it ONLY if you renovate. If you put new floor cover over it, who's to know?

As the poster said, it's only a concern if you grind it up and inhale the dust. Which most likely you won't do!

So no it would not be a deal buster for us.

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Old 06-25-2018, 08:41 AM
 
918 posts, read 404,267 times
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Bit of a zombie thread but l’ll bite

I’m actually surprised it would be a deal breaker for anyone. It’s really no big deal, you just need to be careful when removing it. Incidental Asbestos exposure is NOT what causes the health issues associated with it, it’s chronis exposure to the dust. Silica, coal, and any number of particulates can cause similar problems.

Last edited by Schmooky; 06-25-2018 at 08:45 AM.. Reason: Phone typos!
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