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Old 05-07-2018, 01:57 PM
 
7,081 posts, read 3,780,855 times
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I'm considering a house for numerous reasons (location and price, primarily), but am concerned that the crawlspace is inaccessible. Although the majority of this house appears to sit directly on the ground, somehow or other there is plumbing and duct work under it (perhaps it's somewhat excavated), but there's no way to get under there and inspect. Where it IS sufficiently elevated, boards are nailed in place, and the seller won't remove them or allow them to be removed. The best I can do, I'm told, is to hire a home inspector with a remote camera that can perhaps be snaked under there, but even that may not reveal all since views can be blocked by the aforementioned duct work or other obstructions. The house is nearly a hundred years old and has its share of sloping floors (even what feels like a "hole" in one place under the new wall-to-wall carpeting), but I'm used to that, having owned old houses before. What I don't want is to buy is a house with completely destroyed sub-flooring or some other unpleasant surprise under the surface.

Suggestions?
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Old 05-07-2018, 02:03 PM
 
Location: northern va
1,555 posts, read 1,993,166 times
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First suggestion wold be to move on since the seller will not allow disassembly of the boards nailed in place.

If the property presents a great potential opportunity that the risk is worth it, then do your due diligence concerning inspectors and hope for the best. Be prepared to bring specialized tradesmen in to review those items that might be affected in the crawlspace etc, as an inspector (that is worth their weight) will have trepidation in presenting a clear report without that access.

What are disclosure laws like in your area? Will the seller be in a position to (have to) disclose prior issues etc, or is it more a buyer beware state?
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Old 05-08-2018, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Henderson, NV
818 posts, read 484,030 times
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Soggy Lawn

This guy has a similar issue.
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Old 05-09-2018, 04:38 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
26,847 posts, read 57,851,863 times
Reputation: 29256
Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
I'm considering...
...yet another problem property.

Quote:
Suggestions?
Stop doing that.
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Old 05-09-2018, 07:11 AM
 
7,081 posts, read 3,780,855 times
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The "perfect" properties are more than I'm willing to pay. The question is: which "problem" can be lived with and which can't?
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Old 05-09-2018, 07:48 AM
 
167 posts, read 72,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
The "perfect" properties are more than I'm willing to pay. The question is: which "problem" can be lived with and which can't?
The ones you know exist and can decide on based on the inspection. This one sounds like a gamble. If money down the road is no object, go for it. Me? I’d insist on being able to R&R the skirting to inspect.

Last edited by El Senor; 05-09-2018 at 08:03 AM..
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Old 05-09-2018, 08:03 AM
 
Location: All Over
3,971 posts, read 4,195,107 times
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I ran into a similar home, not quite as old. They had put in new laminate flooring throughtout the property but noticed a lot of uneven floors and sagging areas. They wouldn't let me pull anything up to check, I could have lived with bad floors, what got me is this property the people did a lot of attractive, but cosmetic fixes. I would have preferred they left plywood and charged 5k or 10k less for the house than put down a fairly nice laminate which they wanted to recoup the money on, at which point I would have had to tear it all up to fix the subfloors creating more work and essentially I'm paying for a new floor that's going to go in the trash and which I'm going to have to pay for new flooring after the subflooring was fixed. Sounds like a similar space below the hosue as well, there was a little crawl space but youd be lucky if you could drop down there and be able to crawl around on your stomach to inspect things. Sound up just passing
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Old 05-09-2018, 09:11 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
26,847 posts, read 57,851,863 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
The question is: which "problem" can be lived with...?
The sort of problem you don't need to ask for help to figure out or hire anyone to fix.
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Old 05-09-2018, 10:54 AM
 
7,081 posts, read 3,780,855 times
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Well, do you need to fix sloping floors? Lots of old houses have them. If it's a static situation that isn't growing progressively worse, you can live with it. If the duct work can't be accessed via the crawlspace, you can block off the registers and install a wall-mounted heat/air system. If there are plumbing problems, those can be repaired via flexible tubing - or so I'm told. If the price is right, there's a lot you can live with or work around, IMO. On the other hand, if there's standing water or deadly mold under the house, that's a problem.
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Old 05-09-2018, 11:29 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
26,847 posts, read 57,851,863 times
Reputation: 29256
Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
Well, do you need to fix sloping floors? Lots of old houses have them.
If you want an old house with issues... stick to the one you already own.

btw... have you ever gone to a real financial planner or CPA?
You know, to see just what you can afford nd on what sort of terms?

If you can't afford a house that doesn't need repair... maybe you should just rent.
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