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Old 05-09-2018, 09:09 PM
 
226 posts, read 78,263 times
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I stand corrected on inspection timeframes.

Wells are bigger problems. I know a couple of wells which have failed. One friend spent $30,000 (7 years ago) because her water stopped. The new drill site didn't find water. She went back to the original well and made it deeper. Thankfully it worked. There are only so many times you can drill on a plot of land. With too many holes, land becomes unstable.

With well and septic, there is always the danger of septic flowing down to the well water.

Also with wells, if you lose electricity, the water pump stops and you can't flush a toilet.
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Old 05-09-2018, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
3,842 posts, read 2,071,903 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YorktownGal View Post
Also with wells, if you lose electricity, the water pump stops and you can't flush a toilet.
This is why we keep a big plastic garbage can full of emergency water in winter when power outages are most likely! You can fill the back of the toilet with a bucket in a pinch, and flush. I value toilet flushing very highly on my own hierarchy of needs! At least with the older gravity fed septic systems, they don't require power to function, like some of the newer fancy systems do.
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Old 05-10-2018, 12:44 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,111 posts, read 1,429,322 times
Reputation: 7502
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana Holbrook View Post
Also... consider that this is only an issue IF your septic fails. I would spend as much energy learning how to prolong the life of your drain field. There's no real reason for it to fail, if you take care of it.
I agree about learning to prolong the life of a leach field if you aren’t already familiar with how they work. The OP is in a situation where she has no history of how the homeowner has maintained it previously and can only hope an inspection will reveal all. Taking care of it does not guarantee it won’t fail. It may be less likely. This system has constraints on it already, prayer might have been better advice if she had bought it.

The one thing that piqued my interest was that the realtor wanted the OP to go with a local bank. We had the same thing said to us, our realtor pushed hard for a local bank. We got our mortgage through our credit union and it was more competitive and beat the bank rates. Unlike banks, credit unions can cross state lines. I thought the realtor may have been more comfortable with a known entity more than any other reason. Perhaps realtors here can give their insight on credit unions and any issues they may have experienced.

Last edited by jean_ji; 05-10-2018 at 01:19 AM..
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Old 05-10-2018, 01:23 AM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
3,842 posts, read 2,071,903 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post
The one thing that piqued my interest was that the realtor wanted the OP to go with a local bank. Don’t give in to that, we had the same thing said to us, our realtor pushed hard for a local bank. We got our mortgage through our credit union and it was more competitive and beat the bank rates. Unlike banks, credit unions can cross state lines. I thought the realtor may have been more comfortable with a known entity more than any other reason. Perhaps realtors here can give their insight on credit unions and any issues they may have experienced.
I can almost guarantee that what the realtor said was to go with a local LENDER... it was not a judgment about banks versus a credit union. Credit Unions are fine if you know them and have good people there. I belong to one and know great people there. Loans get done on time, or not, because of the loan officer involved and how good that person is... not necessarily because of the institution. The loan officer makes or breaks it and it's very good practice for a realtor to know good ones to refer clients to.

I would always prefer that to a big national or out of state institution... and for good reason. Deals have failed to close on time or have failed to close at all because the lender was not responsive, timely, and interested in getting it done.
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Old 05-10-2018, 07:39 AM
 
7,843 posts, read 11,162,358 times
Reputation: 10085
I appreciate the push to do some research on holding tanks although I think we have veered way off my original topic

Just talked to a company that pumps a lot of holding tanks in that area.

5cents a gal with a 150.00 fee to show up. Typical tanks are 1500 gal, their trucks can haul 3600 at a time.
She said 2 x tanks is a minimum if you put some in, usually 3 tanks so thats - 4500.

According to google people use 80-100 gal a day. So say you were a conservative user and use 50.

1500 divided by 50 = 30 days. So one person, being very careful would have to have 2 tanks pumped every 2 months
5 cents x 3000 = 150 plus 150 fee is 300 every two months or basically 150 a month
IF you are keeping useage to 50 gal a day.

The woman I talked to says she knows people on a Lake peninsula where there are a lot of holding tanks that shower at the gym, put their dishwater in buckets and throw it out, don't flush as often, go to the laundry mat etc. etc.

Ok, so say I can do that, I'm single. But for resale? A family of 4? They are going to look at a property w regular septic before holding tanks everytime.
I guess that's my main concern here is resale although I refuse to go back to the days of going to a laundry mat.

As for taking care of a septic - I googled that too. Cement tanks last the longest depending on the quality of the cement. Generally CAN be up to 40 even 50 years. Thats the highest number I saw mentioned. This is probably 47 years old.

The woman I talked to at the septic and pumping company said when they chatter about this topic in the office the general consensus is that they would prefer not to be in a holding tank situation. A lot of that is money. She said if you have unlimited funds whatever, have them come every two weeks. But for most people not so much. She said also mentioned what I thought, maybe for the summer season sure.

When I get a minute I'm going to cut and paste the boilerplate from my realtors contract and try to discuss potential adds and changes to speed things up for any next offers. Hope people come back and participaate.
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Old 05-10-2018, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
19,644 posts, read 53,596,112 times
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Is radon a problem there? Contingency it must pass radon test (can take 3 days). Financing and inspection are the usual ones. Make sure you know of any easements.
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Old 05-10-2018, 03:34 PM
 
220 posts, read 75,404 times
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OP

We just purchased another property (#8 lifetime buy or thereabouts) and you'd think we were all-knowing about gotchas. You already found out a gotcha on your purchase that we never encountered.
Pay absolutely no attention to your agent. Their job (and really only job) is to get a sale and collect commission.
Do not expect them to be looking out for your interests.

On our most recent (3 weeks ) purchase I suddenly wondered what "easements" might be attached to the property and then thought "why haven't I ever thought of this before?" Easements can mean I (or next owner) can't build an addition or a pool (here in Florida). It took 3 determined requests/demands before I got the paperwork that showed the small easement from power company. Guy wire was visible in backyard so no surprise. Title company kept giving the runaround. My agent was helpful but did not come up with the idea about asking about easements, I did. Then he said "You know that's something I just read about in my newsletter" meaning easements can cause big problems if not disclosed before sale.

My agent has been in business for 40 years. Ha.

I'm using him to list our property for sale in the next week because no other better agent has been found.
In 30 years and dealing with many agents have found there are no great ones just ones that aren't as bad as others. Their job is to "see nothing, say nothing, and hear nothing" that would stop a sale.

Local knowledge is everything. Talking to county personnel who know where the drain fields are buried can save many $$$$.
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Old 05-10-2018, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
3,842 posts, read 2,071,903 times
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Every home in the country that has utilities connected to the house has an easement for utilities.

It should never be a mystery whether there are easements. They should be described on the legal description, and in the title report that should be ordered for the property the moment you go under contract.

The title company should go over any and all of it with you if you ask. And sure... it's always good to talk to the county and see what records they have on file for the property.

"Pay absolutely no attention to your agent." I do hope you ignore this advice!
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Old 05-11-2018, 06:15 AM
 
7,843 posts, read 11,162,358 times
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Interesting that you mention easements twinkletwinkle. I wasn't thinking about them one way or another but there were a couple on the disclosure and that is what led me to finding my gotcha. There was mention of a drain easement and an electrical easement in the disclosures. When i read drain easement I got a mental vision of a pipe for some reason vs. the typical rural swale. And that made me wonder if septic would ever be laid on this road. Its rural but not that far from a small town and if there was some sort of drain piping what did that mean? Maybe they just weren't hooked up?
When I sent my email to the township assessor I asked 3 questions, one of which is there anything out of the ordinary with these 2 easements and oh by the way, will there ever be septic out there?
And when he replied there was an "and oh by the way did you know there is a note about septic on the well redrilling application". Earlier calls about septic no one brought this up.
So luck gets involved too.

A few years ago when I had picked a retirement date and starting thinking of retiring to this location I started haunting zillow. Unfortunately it takes me a long time to get a sense of a place, I really have to study things and ask a lot of questions. I'm a slow decision maker and risk averse. (People who have traveled a lot, especially to the same place they like over and over don't know how lucky they are.)
Anyway I called the selling agent on a property and she was very nice to me even though I was pretty much the dreaded tire kicker. Not only that but in retrospect knowing what I know now I should have gotten over my fear, listened to her when she said it was priced very reasonably and bought that property and rented it out even though I hated the idea.
She had been selling for a long time and her 2 sons were on her "team". I wanted her as my agent but she is semi-retired and kept pawning me off on one of her sons. He is ok, I think he has missed properties because he just can't seem to get me or remember what I'm looking for but he seems experienced and honest enough.
Mainly I'm sticking with him because he is a local, should know lots of people, and I'm hoping that actually helps at some point. Sometimes knowledge doesn't always translate to actually putting it to use.
There is always that sneaking suspicion that there are properties that don't even hit the market but he hasn't ever come to me with one. I did like the two loan agents he recommended me to, they both seemed very responsive and nice on the phone.

Diana - I think waiting to get info on easements from the title co after you go under contract is not so reassuring I wish complete county records were online so I didn't have to keep bugging the poor county and township employees. They must get all their actual work done in the winter when the market slows down
And of course I'm not going to completely ignore my agent. But I do disagree with him on the right choice for me at times. I guess this was one of them. He could be right but it would take a crystal ball to know.
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Old 05-11-2018, 07:48 AM
 
Location: MID ATLANTIC
7,606 posts, read 17,664,631 times
Reputation: 8102
"Pay absolutely no attention to your agent." Bad advice. Your agent (in most, if not all, states) has a fiduciary responsibility towards their client. What does this mean? Your best interests come first. If something good or bad is known about the property or transaction is known by the agent, they must share the info with you. This applies to a buyer's agent and their buyer. Not dual agency, where an agent represents the seller and writes a contract for the buyer on their own listing. The listing agent can't make false statements about the property, but they won't have the best interests of the buyer in mind when making proposals and/or suggestions in the negotiations, the seller is first for them.

If you do not completely trust your Realtor, get a new one. But you also need to be clear on what you want. That is your responsibility. It's not their job to guess. "I need to see a complete contract I am expected to sign well before we make an offer." If you need time to vet the well and septic beyond the home inspection period, ask your agent to write an extended w&s inspection period in the offer. If it's a matter of you don't know what you don't know, get yourself to a bookstore and learn. Take a class.

Do your due diligence, but don't get caught up in information paralysis, 2nd only to buyer's remorse. Tune out all advisors except your trusted Realtor and trusted loan officer. Like expecting a baby and the surprises after the birth, buying a home brings out everyone that ever experienced a horror scenario. (And, some take delight in sharing those stories with you under the guise of sparing you from the same). Think about it, those are NOT who you want to take advice from.
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