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Old 05-29-2018, 08:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
Generally, aging trailer parks are on valuable land. The community grew up around them until the land becomes more valuable than the space rent brings in.

Trailer park are regularly sold to real estate developers who have far more interest in shopping malls, business centers, and high end condos than in affordable housing.
I don't think most are on valuable land, that's why they are there. In some places the land was not valuable when it was built but has increased in value. When the income from selling outpaces the income from the yearly amount of lot rent then it's more valuable. They are almost never is a great area either. There are even some that are by the beach in some Florida Towns which is crazy when you consider storm surge and hurricane winds and the cost of the land, most are in decent to bad areas.

Where I live in SW Florida there is a lot of undeveloped land so the land they are on has little to no value besides what people are willing to pay rent on it, and in some places it's high. Some places sell the lots but those are mostly in 55+ areas and then they have HOA fees which are not too bad depending on the amenities. Still you see homes for sale for close the price of starter homes, it's almost like you own a condo but you have to maintain the property/building and your neighbors are not right next to you, but not too far since the lots are never big and then they don't let you put a fence in.
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Old 05-29-2018, 08:56 AM
 
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In many parts of the country there are what are called "zero lot line" houses where one wall of the house is on the lot line; the other wall is not; and there is a small front and rear yard. Generally the wall facing the neighbor is a solid blank wall. Often the small rear yard is enclosed by a high fence or brick wall. The lot is probably 1/10 acre for a house of say 1000-2000 sq. ft. These can work really well for people who don't want much yard work but don't want to live in an apartment/condo. I lived in one for several years. Something like this could go in where a trailer park was, depending on what's happened to the neighborhood.
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Old 05-29-2018, 09:00 AM
 
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Some may not be on valuable land. It certainly depends on what is going on around it, as you so astutely pointed out.

So if the owners want to develop it for micro homes, they can certainly do so.

Do you have any examples of trailer park owners who have gone to the trouble and expense of converting lucrative trailer park rental income into microhome lots?

The trailer parks I've seen converted have all been where the towns have grown up around them and the land has been converted to uses that are far more lucrative than microhome lots/affordable housing.
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Old 05-29-2018, 09:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
In many parts of the country there are what are called "zero lot line" houses where one wall of the house is on the lot line; the other wall is not; and there is a small front and rear yard. Generally the wall facing the neighbor is a solid blank wall. Often the small rear yard is enclosed by a high fence or brick wall. The lot is probably 1/10 acre for a house of say 1000-2000 sq. ft. These can work really well for people who don't want much yard work but don't want to live in an apartment/condo. I lived in one for several years. Something like this could go in where a trailer park was, depending on what's happened to the neighborhood.
Trailer parks often bring in a good deal of income for not a lot of work.

While a trailer park owner could certainly decide to sell the property for zero lot line homes, the lot price would have to be affordable to make it work.

What would be the incentive to sell a lucrative business with a steady income for lots to be used for zero lot line homes?
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Old 05-29-2018, 09:06 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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I don't know whether this will work or not. The former park I mentioned earlier is behind a car repair place, Hi-Tech. You can see the backs of the new houses that replaced the mobile homes.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/MD...!4d-76.6388748

Last edited by North Beach Person; 05-29-2018 at 09:25 AM.. Reason: clarification
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Old 05-29-2018, 09:08 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,173 posts, read 39,280,307 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
Trailer parks often bring in a good deal of income for not a lot of work.

While a trailer park owner could certainly decide to sell the property for zero lot line homes, the lot price would have to be affordable to make it work.

What would be the incentive to sell a lucrative business with a steady income for lots to be used for zero lot line homes?
Retirement cash.
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Old 05-29-2018, 09:08 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Javacoffee View Post
I may be wrong, but I don't think it's that easy to kick mobile home residents out of their trailers and sell the land beneath them. Surely there has to be some government protection. The residents can't move their trailers into another trailer park if the structures are older (I believe it's 2 years, not 10). The residents are basically kicked out of their homes, into the streets and made homeless?
If they don't own the land then they can be removed but most take a squatters stance and simply won't leave. To be fair they are usually older/disabled so it makes the landowner look like a bully displacing these people but the surrounding area is usually thrilled to get rid of the old trailer park.

It comes down to choices, years ago they got a good deal on the trailer/land rental and used it for decades in most cases. However by NOT buying an individual lot that choice doomed them decades later.
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Old 05-29-2018, 09:17 AM
 
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Just so you know a trailer park and a mobile home community are 2 different things.

A trailer park can have regular sized homes but usually only have single wides. they often have dirt roads or poorly paved roads, little to no amenities, such as no pool, no tennis courts no clubhouse, and sometimes have RV homes that are only 8 feet wide and have a limit of about 40 feet, and the homes are only as far apart as one driveway would fit.

A mobile home community is nicer, has lawns, street mailboxes, paved parking, plus amenities, etc. The rents are higher but it's nicer but it can still be sold off and you will lose your home if you can't afford to move it or have no place to move it to.
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Old 05-29-2018, 09:27 AM
 
10,280 posts, read 6,533,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
In many parts of the country there are what are called "zero lot line" houses where one wall of the house is on the lot line; the other wall is not; and there is a small front and rear yard. Generally the wall facing the neighbor is a solid blank wall. Often the small rear yard is enclosed by a high fence or brick wall. The lot is probably 1/10 acre for a house of say 1000-2000 sq. ft. These can work really well for people who don't want much yard work but don't want to live in an apartment/condo. I lived in one for several years. Something like this could go in where a trailer park was, depending on what's happened to the neighborhood.
I know someone who lives in the northeast where land is valuable in a city. His home is a zero lot home, one side of his home is on the property line but then I think the rules is that the other side had to be 6 feet away when it was built

The lost are narrow, 25 feet wide. and no one has a driveway on those homes but they go far back 150 feet.

Now new homes that are built can only be 18 feet wide and have to have at least 3 feet of clearance on each side. Recently a new home was built next to an old home and they no longer put in basements, so the first level is a 1 car garage but the paved platform allows for 2 cars to be parked outside, behind the garage is a 1/1 and on the 2 other levels are 2 3/2 units. They took advantage of the long lot and used most of the land where the backyard would be.
Attached Thumbnails
Converting aging trailer parks to micro home developments?-zero-lot.png  
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Old 05-29-2018, 09:31 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by City Guy997S View Post
If they don't own the land then they can be removed but most take a squatters stance and simply won't leave.
They are renters that singed a long complicated lease so they can squat but then they will be evicted and have an eviction on their record. It sucks because people put money into these homes over the years and then they are worthless, unless someone wants to buy their old appliances and central AC, if they go to an apartment that already has them they lose everything basically.
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