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Old 05-29-2018, 09:55 AM
 
5,426 posts, read 8,219,659 times
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I went to a presentation on this subject. Apparently it is quite popular in Atlanta and other high demand areas. Boomers can downsize and pursue a walkable lifestyle and still be close to the suburban community where they raised the family and have connections.
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Old 05-29-2018, 09:56 AM
 
33,058 posts, read 12,540,920 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LifeIsGood01 View Post
...
There is one that turned into mini studio apartments and that's a great idea.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HmL2l-bcuUQ
...
What a great idea.

micro-lofts - arcade providence .:. a historic revival

Seems the upper two floors never really did rent out until they were converted to micro-lofts. Now they have a wait list for tenants.

Snug, but well-designed.
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Old 05-29-2018, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
3,100 posts, read 1,045,425 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry88 View Post
Why don't developers turn the hundreds of dead malls into living communities, build out 1000 apt units, and then have shops and restaurants inside to cater to residents?
That's what malls were originally supposed to be. As are "historic districts" where they try to mix tourist-trap businesses, real businesses like legal firms and local residents.

It doesn't work. Malls were built for a particularly purpose - google "Skinner box" - and while it might seem a waste, bulldozing them and building purpose-suited replacements (even your micro-village concept) would be far cheaper and more effective in the long run.

I have never, in 30+ years, seen a conversion of mass retail or industrial site to residential/community UNLESS the building was already surrounded by an existing community. You can't take something in surburbia, isolated by design, placement and decay (not to mention psychological factors) and turn it into the Quainte Village of Upson Downs.
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Old 05-29-2018, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
3,840 posts, read 2,063,984 times
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This is probably not a bad idea for some malls.... Bring in a grocery store and a hair salon and a couple restaurants and a doctor's office, a few other shops, and you have yourself a great, self-contained little town. Never even need to figure out where your car is.
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Old 05-29-2018, 11:09 AM
 
9,891 posts, read 5,739,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana Holbrook View Post
This is probably not a bad idea for some malls.... Bring in a grocery store and a hair salon and a couple restaurants and a doctor's office, a few other shops, and you have yourself a great, self-contained little town. Never even need to figure out where your car is.
Sounds like prison.
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Old 05-29-2018, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
3,840 posts, read 2,063,984 times
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Does to me too, but you'd never have to go outside in the rain!
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Old 05-29-2018, 11:34 AM
46H
 
846 posts, read 475,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry88 View Post
I'm talking the big malls. I was in NJ last month, one in Wayne was dead. Paramus Park all but dead.

Here's what could happen to America's hundreds of dead malls - Business Insider

Paramus Park is far from dead. The Sears is being replaced with a Stew Leonard's and a new 13 screen theater. If it did not have the traffic, Stew Leonard's and the theatre would not be taking all that space.

I drive by Paramus Park on a regular basis and the lots always have plenty of cars, even without Sears.

https://www.northjersey.com/story/ne...ter/408220002/


Redevelopment of malls is purely a matter of location. A dying or dead mall on the outskirts of a small town is not going to ever become a housing location. Sometimes you cannot blame online shopping for the failure of a mall. The developer just overestimated the shopping traffic and overestimated the population increase for the area around the mall. Some other factors include major business closing or moving.
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Old 05-29-2018, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
21,034 posts, read 15,336,412 times
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Dead malls were never built in mind for residential housing. It would be difficult to retrofit them.
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Old 05-29-2018, 02:24 PM
 
4,872 posts, read 2,161,995 times
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All for utilising current structures. Ya think plumbing might be the draw back? I can't imagine the thousands needed to do that and re- design the hvac system. I worked in a retail store ...their warehouse portion was a death trap....wobbly cat walk and old electric wiring.

Our local investors did turn a school into apartments....that was phenomenal! Loved that they used the original cafeteria ...and created a business for the residents if they wanted to dine on premise.
Even us non residents of the building can go there and get 'schooled' on local cuisine
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Old 05-29-2018, 02:26 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
28,445 posts, read 50,699,085 times
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The dead malls have to be in the same area where there is demand for cheap hosing, in other words, a lot of homeless. Here in the Seattle area, for example there are about 12,000 homeless, but the malls are not only thriving, but being expanded, with new stores coming in. Back in 2007 one local mall was being declared "dead" after the failure of more tenant businesses, but now it's undergoing a huge transformation with higher end retailers than before, and residential apartments included. They are not going to be low income, they are being called "Luxury."



Village at Totem Lake update: Trader Joe’s, Wells Fargo to relocate this summer | Kirkland Reporter


https://www.thevillageattotemlake.com/
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