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Old 05-30-2018, 10:57 PM
 
173 posts, read 51,287 times
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would much rather see the malls demolished and the land returned back to its natural state.
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Old 05-31-2018, 12:59 AM
 
2,358 posts, read 595,169 times
Reputation: 3026
Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
A big issue I see is that the vast majority of these malls are not in the central business district of a city, so there won't be that many employment opportunities in walkable distance. Sure, the one in Providence worked because it was a 200 year old building that the rest of the city had grown around. If Faneuil Hall/Quincy Market in Boston or South Street Seaport hadn't already been successfully redeveloped, locations like those could work. But the dying malls aren't in places like those.
This is not accurate at all. The Providence Place Mall was built from scratch on land that had the URI Providence extension and its dirt parking lot. This area was rundown, basically deserted, and not even part of downtown Providence (it was very close to downtown but there was no access). The city forced the URI extension to move, the building was torn down, the Mall was constructed, the I-95 off-ramp was redesigned/moved, and downtown Providence was expanded.

Here's a flashback video from 1987 showing the old URI Extension that was eventually torn down circa 1996 so the Providence Place Mall could be built:

Flashback: Building the Providence Place Mall | WJAR

Last edited by redplum33; 05-31-2018 at 01:39 AM..
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Old 05-31-2018, 01:55 AM
 
Location: Staten Island, NY
2,989 posts, read 784,097 times
Reputation: 2181
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry88 View Post
Why don't developers turn the hundreds of dead malls into living communities, build out 1000 apt units, and then have shops and restaurants inside to cater to residents?
It's not a bad idea and it's been done before. Fun fact, The Romans turned the Roman Collesium into a market than a convent than a housing project. After a series of large earthquakes, it was deemed too dangerous to continue using and was permanently retired.
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Old 05-31-2018, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Maryland
828 posts, read 242,230 times
Reputation: 1910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry88 View Post
I'm talking the big malls. I was in NJ last month, one in Wayne was dead. Paramus Park all but dead.

Here's what could happen to America's hundreds of dead malls - Business Insider
We have a dead medium size mall here in Frederick, been sitting empty for a couple years now. I recently heard Walmart apparently pulled out of the redevelopment plan since that wiki was written.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Towne_Mall

We had a huge, high end mall that was recently completely torn down in Rockville, near Bethesda city line, called White Flint Mall. It was pretty impressive in its prime.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Flint_Mall
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Old 05-31-2018, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Brew City
3,153 posts, read 1,964,939 times
Reputation: 4193
It's happening in downtown Milwaukee.

The building is super cool too.


https://urbanmilwaukee.com/2017/09/0...ue-apartments/


Plus residents will be connected to the elevated walkways to get around various parts of downtown protected from the weather.
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Old 05-31-2018, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
19,047 posts, read 10,079,571 times
Reputation: 27862
Quote:
Originally Posted by redplum33 View Post
This is not accurate at all. The Providence Place Mall was built from scratch on land that had the URI Providence extension and its dirt parking lot. This area was rundown, basically deserted, and not even part of downtown Providence (it was very close to downtown but there was no access). The city forced the URI extension to move, the building was torn down, the Mall was constructed, the I-95 off-ramp was redesigned/moved, and downtown Providence was expanded.

Here's a flashback video from 1987 showing the old URI Extension that was eventually torn down circa 1996 so the Providence Place Mall could be built:

Flashback: Building the Providence Place Mall | WJAR
Except of course that Providence Place Mall has zero to do with the topic of this thread because it was not converted to apartments.

The mall I referenced (and which someone else had posted a video about) is this

Quote:
When it was built 188 years ago, the Arcade Providence was America's first shopping mall, hosting boutiques on all three floors. Now those shops have been transformed into 48 tiny apartments and a mix of businesses, including restaurants, a coffee shop, and a new hair salon.
America's oldest shopping mall is now micro apartments - Business Insider
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Old 05-31-2018, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
19,047 posts, read 10,079,571 times
Reputation: 27862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegabern View Post
It's happening in downtown Milwaukee.

The building is super cool too.


https://urbanmilwaukee.com/2017/09/0...ue-apartments/


Plus residents will be connected to the elevated walkways to get around various parts of downtown protected from the weather.
That looks like it will be great! And decent sized units too, not the micro-apartments like the one in Providence. If I were renting, I would absolutely be interested in something like that.
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Old 05-31-2018, 11:09 AM
 
2,358 posts, read 595,169 times
Reputation: 3026
Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
Except of course that Providence Place Mall has zero to do with the topic of this thread because it was not converted to apartments.

The mall I referenced (and which someone else had posted a video about) is this



America's oldest shopping mall is now micro apartments - Business Insider

The Arcade is technically considered the oldest mall in the country, but nobody viewed the Arcade as a mall. Just like nobody views Faneuil Hall as a mall.

As for the topic of this thread, the converted Arcade would hardly be considered a modern village.
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Old 05-31-2018, 03:01 PM
 
2,671 posts, read 2,780,180 times
Reputation: 3111
Quote:
Originally Posted by LesLucid View Post
We have a dead medium size mall here in Frederick, been sitting empty for a couple years now. I recently heard Walmart apparently pulled out of the redevelopment plan since that wiki was written.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Towne_Mall

That is the one I mentioned that has a problem with asbestos. Now there is supposedly a high end theater and restaurant complex going in. I'm not holding my breath


Quote:
We had a huge, high end mall that was recently completely torn down in Rockville, near Bethesda city line, called White Flint Mall. It was pretty impressive in its prime.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Flint_Mall

At one time 10% of all sales tax collected in Maryland was collected within 1 mile of White Flint Mall. It was THE place for a high end retailer to locate. Then it collapsed.
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