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Old 05-30-2018, 09:04 PM
 
Location: 33950-bound
503 posts, read 230,962 times
Reputation: 779

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Bungalove, you can contact local drilling companies since they have an idea of depths and performances of wells they have done in your area but also I think the state can answer some questions about water availability and reliability as well the ability to go deeper on a new permit if necessary. Also, sort of fun to bring out a dowser (my brother does that) to see what turns up.

I've never heard of a bored vs. dug well at the depth you refer to.

Our bored/cased well is 1,050' deep into the Laramie/Foxhills (eastern Colo.). Gould pump is set at approx. 750', around 30 GPM; clean, nice water that is amazingly soft, but surprisingly warm (56 F). The original permit granted by State of Colorado had us going into the Lower Arapahoe at first, about 600 or so feet. GPM was a dismal 5 GPM. We had an option to install a cistern or ask for another permit to be granted (this was in 2000, for a whole hella bunch more $). All in all, the well (and pump install) cost us close to $30K.

Never hurts to ask these questions, water is so important.

Also surprised that you are unable to apply to enlarge your leachfield... but different counties have their own rules I guess.
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Old 05-30-2018, 11:35 PM
 
Location: on the wind
4,379 posts, read 1,647,090 times
Reputation: 15548
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bungalove View Post
The septic isn't expandable due to its location. If they had placed it uphill from the house it could have been bigger, but it would have required a pump to lift the sewage. Where it is currently it is close enough to the creek that it can't be any bigger. The county did send me the plat from the Environmental health Department that showed a proposed location for a new septic system - again, it would be uphill and require a pump, which I wouldn't want. It's bad enough that the sump pump runs almost continuously in the basement. That means I have to get generator because if the power goes off, the basement would be flooded, not to mention not having any water from the well anyway.

I did talk to a well company that is local to the house and they have pretty quick turnaround. They also recommended measuring the GPM as very important, not to mention all the required water testing. They would also measure the depth of the well too. I'm just not sure about all of this stuff; its a big decision.
The well information you'll get should address your questions. You definitely want GPM and recharge rates, plus contaminant and water quality testing. It will help you decide what if any treatment or filtering necessary and give you some idea of the condition of the plumbing (very hard water that has never been softened or filtered could mean you have appliances and plumbing that's not in great shape). Personally, a sump pump that runs that much would annoy me if not concern me.

What would worry me more is the septic situation. If you only plan one bedroom's occupancy for the house over time it may not be a problem, but if you plan to have more people there it will. You do not want to overtax a septic system and possibly damage the leach field! If you plan to hold on to the place for many years resale may not be a concern, but if you can see needing to sell it sooner, that one bedroom capacity could hurt.
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Old 05-31-2018, 01:34 AM
 
400 posts, read 124,039 times
Reputation: 497
2 pages and not one joke about cheering up the well? For shame!
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Old 05-31-2018, 07:50 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,197 posts, read 4,007,568 times
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I am also in SW Florida and during our prolonged dry season this year some people had their wells go dry including my boss. Luckily his well is only for irrigation, not for human consumption. I believe I heard him say that they needed to go down further than 180 feet to get water. However here in Florida we have a definite dry season. Does Virginia have that issue or do you get your rain spread throughout the year?
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Old 05-31-2018, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Virginia
3,472 posts, read 1,672,614 times
Reputation: 9306
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
The well information you'll get should address your questions. You definitely want GPM and recharge rates, plus contaminant and water quality testing. It will help you decide what if any treatment or filtering necessary and give you some idea of the condition of the plumbing (very hard water that has never been softened or filtered could mean you have appliances and plumbing that's not in great shape). Personally, a sump pump that runs that much would annoy me if not concern me.

What would worry me more is the septic situation. If you only plan one bedroom's occupancy for the house over time it may not be a problem, but if you plan to have more people there it will. You do not want to overtax a septic system and possibly damage the leach field! If you plan to hold on to the place for many years resale may not be a concern, but if you can see needing to sell it sooner, that one bedroom capacity could hurt.
I agree about the septic constraint as far as resale goes. This would be my "last" house, so I wouldn't be selling soon (I hope!). There would only be me there so no problem with that, but future occupants might certainly like a larger septic system and the only way available is to put in a new one in a different location. The upstairs of the house could be finished for another 2 bedrooms, but not on the current septic system. The other thing I'm concerned about is the amount of mowing I'd have to do - half of the 10 acre property is cleared and I'd have to buy a big garden tractor to manage it all. Then I'd need a decent shed for the tractor, and a generator for the well and the sump pump. It all just adds up, you know? It's always been my dream to have a property with a stream, and this one has the old one-room house along with the main house as well (which satisfies my old house lust), but I'm worried about taking on way too much to maintain at age 68. It's not like I HAVE to move, but properties with streams are hard to find.
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Old 05-31-2018, 09:12 AM
 
4,494 posts, read 7,992,379 times
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Personally, I'd never mow more than 1 acre. I only need so much lawn. A cheap riding lawnmower would do fine.

I'd let someone grow hay on the rest of the 9 acres and pay me. Or simply let it grow in.
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Old 05-31-2018, 03:05 PM
 
Location: on the wind
4,379 posts, read 1,647,090 times
Reputation: 15548
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bungalove View Post
I agree about the septic constraint as far as resale goes. This would be my "last" house, so I wouldn't be selling soon (I hope!). There would only be me there so no problem with that, but future occupants might certainly like a larger septic system and the only way available is to put in a new one in a different location. The upstairs of the house could be finished for another 2 bedrooms, but not on the current septic system. The other thing I'm concerned about is the amount of mowing I'd have to do - half of the 10 acre property is cleared and I'd have to buy a big garden tractor to manage it all. Then I'd need a decent shed for the tractor, and a generator for the well and the sump pump. It all just adds up, you know? It's always been my dream to have a property with a stream, and this one has the old one-room house along with the main house as well (which satisfies my old house lust), but I'm worried about taking on way too much to maintain at age 68. It's not like I HAVE to move, but properties with streams are hard to find.
Just a thought about all the acreage. See if there's a conservation agency or NGO operating in the region (local ag extension office, county or state conservation agencies, private land trusts, etc.) and see if there might be a program that helps you "abandon" part of it, especially adjacent to the stream for wildlife habitat purposes. There could be restrictions on using that area anyway. You might be able to get a tax break, not have to deal with maintaining it, and do some good for your local critters. You don't really need to keep mowing it. They could also educate you about noxious weeds, how to avoid establishing or spreading them, and how to avoid penalties for creating nuisance issues.
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Old 05-31-2018, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Virginia
3,472 posts, read 1,672,614 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
Just a thought about all the acreage. See if there's a conservation agency or NGO operating in the region (local ag extension office, county or state conservation agencies, private land trusts, etc.) and see if there might be a program that helps you "abandon" part of it, especially adjacent to the stream for wildlife habitat purposes. There could be restrictions on using that area anyway. You might be able to get a tax break, not have to deal with maintaining it, and do some good for your local critters. You don't really need to keep mowing it. They could also educate you about noxious weeds, how to avoid establishing or spreading them, and how to avoid penalties for creating nuisance issues.
Yes, I'm thinking about several possibilities on the acreage, an agricultural out lease being one of them. I did some research today on the property (the people at the records office are super friendly and helpful) and the property before now has always been a 100 acre parcel going back to 1914. It also has only belonged to 2 families, but was recently bought by a timber company which will parcel off the 10 acres with the house and timber the rest. That gives credence to the one-room house being built in 1914 by the original owners. I think I'm nuts but I'm going back for a second look tomorrow and will probably write a contract. The sellers will probably also not like my offer, but the house does have real limitations with the existing 1 BR/1BA configuration and the 1BR septic constraint. I'm not happy with the 21 year-old roof (30 year, 3-tab, either.) I figure the sellers can negotiate or not. I like my current house just fine; it just doesn't have a stream. However, I can always walk the 3 blocks (if we had "blocks" here) to the river for free.
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Old 05-31-2018, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
7,119 posts, read 5,287,602 times
Reputation: 9686
Re the pumps...I wouldn’t get too hot and bothered...half of the NYC metro has a pump to get their sewage to the mains.
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Old 05-31-2018, 09:29 PM
 
Location: Virginia
3,472 posts, read 1,672,614 times
Reputation: 9306
Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
Re the pumps...I wouldn’t get too hot and bothered...half of the NYC metro has a pump to get their sewage to the mains.
I would worry about the sump pump, because if the power went out the basement would flood and ruin the air handler and propane backup furnace that is down there, hence the need for a backup generator. Also I really like to have running water if the power goes out, and a well pump needs power too. There's no sewer pump required now since they located the septic downhill from the house. If I did buy it, I have no intention of installing a bigger septic system in a different location uphill just for myself. The next buyer could do that. Oh, after doing some more research, it turns out that the one-room house is older than 1914. The original property owner's wife died in 1914, and the first property owner sold the farm to the next family the same year. The second family held it until 2012. The old one-room house may actually pre-date 1900, which is really exciting for an old house person like me. And I can make the 1997 brick house over as I like with some creative touches and new flooring. It's still a scary proposition, but I'm getting enthused!

Last edited by Bungalove; 05-31-2018 at 09:41 PM.. Reason: Add info
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