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Old 06-11-2018, 02:33 PM
 
2,055 posts, read 858,952 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LifeIsGood01 View Post
The chart has no bedrooms that's where my red dot would be,
Actually my red dot wouldn't be in the bedroom either. I only sleep there - but not right now because all the bedrooms are currently empty while I repaint and repair.

One bedroom will be for sewing and all my fiber work. One I will sleep in. And one will be my pottery. Otherwise I would need a workshop, this way my workshop is in the house. Much cheaper and - as another poster noted - way easier to sell than a 1 BR house with a workshop. LOL!

When I was in the market for my first home, I specifically laid out my wants and do-not-wants to the realtor, and the two most important items were firstly that I WOULD NOT be going over budget for any reason, and that I DID NOT want a formal dining room.

She repeatedly broke both strictures and did not seem to have any ability whatsoever to stick to things I would actually consider buying. Ultimately I found a house for sale via the newspaper myself and bought that. What a maroon!
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Old 06-11-2018, 07:11 PM
 
845 posts, read 469,364 times
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I love all the dots on the toilet seat and only 1 dot in front of the bathroom sink!
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Old 06-11-2018, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Raleigh NC
8,326 posts, read 6,542,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
Yeah, but that was 60+ years ago - 71 years ago for the first houses (I grew up going to the Levittown school district although not in a Levitt house).

People's tastes and standards have changed. The average new home size keeps going up, so I think it's a fair statement to say that in general, the home the average American dreams about is larger than what someone imagined in 1947.

That doesn't mean everyone shares that dream, of course, but if people didn't want bigger houses, builders would be building more smaller ones. They build what they can sell for the most profit they can get, and if the bigger houses sell, it's what they build
it's kind of like the cannolis I got from Whole Foods tonight.

The small cannolis were $2.49 apiece. Plenty of sugary goodness for any one person. They were about 1/2 the size of the large cannolis, at $2.99 apiece. Which ones were purchased?
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Old 06-11-2018, 08:17 PM
 
1,977 posts, read 993,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BoBromhal View Post
it's kind of like the cannolis I got from Whole Foods tonight.

The small cannolis were $2.49 apiece. Plenty of sugary goodness for any one person. They were about 1/2 the size of the large cannolis, at $2.99 apiece. Which ones were purchased?
I would buy the smaller ones because I don't need the extra calories. No question.
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Old 06-11-2018, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
19,826 posts, read 10,740,621 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emotiioo View Post
I would buy the smaller ones because I don't need the extra calories. No question.
maybe you would, but I think the reality is most people would buy the bigger ones, and say it's worth it because you are getting so much more for just a small amount more money.

The point being that a larger house is less expensive on a square foot basis than a smaller one, so people justify buying more house since it's not that much more money. Whether they actually need more house or not.
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Old 06-12-2018, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
2,422 posts, read 1,082,727 times
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I suppose rooms in a house are a lot like clothes in a closet. There are some things I wear several times a week (underwear, gym clothes, shoes, coats, etc.) There are some things I wear less often, but still wear regularly and definitely need in my wardrobe (I may not wear a specific shirt more than once a month, but I still need shirts).


Then you have the optional items such as a nice suit, dresses, my husband's tux, etc. We may not wear those things very often, but I'm glad we have them. Just like I'm glad we have a guest bedroom, even though we only have guests staying with us once or twice a year.
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Old 06-12-2018, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
2,422 posts, read 1,082,727 times
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I was looking at the map, thinking about which areas of our house we really use all the time. One thing that's funny about us is we hang out on the porch most of the time and don't really spend much time in the living room. But I wouldn't buy a house without one.
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Old 06-12-2018, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
10,413 posts, read 9,675,630 times
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Actually my neighborhood doesn't have any homes below 2500 sq ft and there is a definite price difference with additional space. A 2500 sq ft home costs about 100k less than a 3500 one.

People shouldn't have to justify their home purchases, really. It actually costs more money purchasing a larger home when you factor in the purchase price, heating and cooling, etc. etc.

Larger homes have been around for ages, just look at some of the older victorians. Not sure why it's considered some type of recent phenomenon.
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Old 06-12-2018, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
10,413 posts, read 9,675,630 times
Reputation: 13560
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoBromhal View Post
it's kind of like the cannolis I got from Whole Foods tonight.

The small cannolis were $2.49 apiece. Plenty of sugary goodness for any one person. They were about 1/2 the size of the large cannolis, at $2.99 apiece. Which ones were purchased?
I'd buy the larger one and eat it. Because I'm a sugarholic.
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Old 06-12-2018, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,835 posts, read 7,476,042 times
Reputation: 4395
Quote:
Originally Posted by riaelise View Post
Actually my neighborhood doesn't have any homes below 2500 sq ft and there is a definite price difference with additional space. A 2500 sq ft home costs about 100k less than a 3500 one.

People shouldn't have to justify their home purchases, really. It actually costs more money purchasing a larger home when you factor in the purchase price, heating and cooling, etc. etc.

Larger homes have been around for ages, just look at some of the older victorians. Not sure why it's considered some type of recent phenomenon.
In Victorian times, there were usually two reasons a house would be more than 3000 s.f.: they were rich, and/or they had a large family.


My neighbor's turn-of-the-century Victorian house is about 4000 s.f. The original owner was the founder of the Stambaugh hardware store chain. On a different side of town, there are large houses built in the teens and twenties, by the local steel mills, for the workers in those mills. These houses were large, because the families were often very large. It wasn't unusual for a family to have 10 kids, back then. This is also why you see those big old farm houses out in the country. Farmers were often relatively wealthy, and had large families to help with all the work.


Generally, the people buying large houses today (3000 s.f.+) aren't rich, and usually don't have large families.
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