U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-13-2018, 10:13 AM
 
987 posts, read 283,805 times
Reputation: 1458

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by wharton View Post
Spuggy, I have little use for inspectors, having spent a lifetime career as a builder and electrician. I sold my last personal home a few years back. It was a three year old, custom built place, built in one of the most overzealous code areas I ever did work in. The buyer had a total inspection package done, and the inspection came back with TWENTY SEVEN pages of issues. Now before you reach the conclusion that I am a shyster builder, and was "caught" by this inspector, the fact was TWO of his issues were totally legit, my mistake and corrected immediately. The original, legitimate, and competent code inspector and myself both missed the fact that the tub, in a little used guest bath, was not caulked at the floor. There were also two screws missing from the lid of a dry well pump cover, in the yard. It took me ten minutes to fix ALL the legitimate problems my nearly new home had.......................

Other than that, the "the certified home inspector" was bat crap crazy, and cited things that simply did not exist, and code violations that he fabricated from thin air. I spent 45 minutes in a conference with the buyer and all other parties, except the "certified home inspector" who lacked the heuvos to attend. I blew apart every claim he had, citing everything from the IRC code book, to EPA guidelines for water and radon sampling. In closing the meeting, I told the buyer that she was the victim of an incompetent agent and a fraudulent inspector. She was welcome to buy the house, but the inspection was illegitimate and will be ignored, and any expectations as to me paying for radon mitigation, or septic pumping or any other BS recommendations from the "certified home inspector" were not happening. She bought the house, it's been trouble free, and she loves the place.

Spuggy, the fraud involving your "deadly leaking furnace" is common. Some shady characters in the home inspection, and HVAC business will falsely claim that you are in grave danger, in order to get you to treat their "findings" as a "house on fire" grade emergency, and immediately replace a perfectly good furnace at a hugely inflated price. There have been cases of contractors ending up in jail for this. Some have even been caught claiming this crap, while standing next to a CO detector that is reading zero, and has no dangerous levels ever recorded in it's digital history.
Why do the inspectors lie like this? Are they bribed by buyers who want to 'make a deal'? Or, when they get to scaring buyers, are they claiming problems so contractor friends they refer to will make some money on it?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-13-2018, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
31,647 posts, read 55,374,605 times
Reputation: 30193
Quote:
Originally Posted by petsandgardens View Post
Why do the inspectors lie like this? Are they bribed by buyers who want to 'make a deal'? Or, when they get to scaring buyers, are they claiming problems so contractor friends they refer to will make some money on it?
I haven't witnessed inspectors flat out lying.
But, I have seen exceptional ineptitude many times.
I worry more about incoherent reports and inexperience moreso than lying.

"At least where I am...."
Now, in areas where anyone can call themselves an inspector, with no licensing or qualifications, no background checks, I suppose it does open the door to all sorts of chicanery.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2018, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Vermont
10,097 posts, read 10,620,835 times
Reputation: 13445
Also, you need to set aside half the cost of the future bedroom addition, just in case they want one later.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2018, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Salem, OR
13,750 posts, read 31,588,814 times
Reputation: 12119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spuggy View Post
We have a buyer who declared after the inspection report that he wanted the roof repaired, a new heating furnace because it was cracked and leaking carbon dioxide all over the house, a new air conditioning unit, and pay for repair on one board on back of house and then a paint contractor to paint the back. We paid for a second inspection and asked the roofing company we had a warranty on for our recently replaced roof do an inspection.

No crack in heating furnace and no carbon dioxide leaking, roof fine, we were willing to pay for small repair to wood on back of house but not paying for painting contractor as we had a gallon of matching exterior shed, air condioner is old but needed maintenance which we did.

Buyer was not happy and asked us to choose another inspector that he would pay for to check the heating and again it was fine.

He wants to buy the house, we want to sell the house so we compromised on the air conditioning and said we would pay half the cost of a new air condioner. I have no clue what the heck his first inspector was up to, but he frightened the heck out of the seller.


Op, As for unreasonable requests, donít take it personally , you can say no or offer a small sum so you can get on with the sale.
I've never had a home inspector lie, but sometimes how things are said get misconstrued by buyers. Carrier brand of furnaces, for example, tend to get more cracked heat exchangers as they age which can lead to leaking carbon monoxide. So an inspector can say that and the buyer hears bad furnace that is going to kill me even if it isn't cracked at that time. I've had HVAC contractors tell homeowners to just monitor it and get it serviced every year and it still freaks out some people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2018, 11:16 AM
 
Location: 33950-bound
503 posts, read 227,371 times
Reputation: 779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana Holbrook View Post
I wouldn't bother meeting with anyone about the feasibility of what they want to do to the septic... it doesn't really matter to you.

...

The details matter. We don't know if this was a high or low offer, whether they are asking for a few or many thousands... We don't know if the property was on the market for a day, or has been listed for weeks. We don't know whether you NEED to sell asap or whether you can wait for another offer if this one falls through. We don't know enough to weigh the risks and benefits here, really.... But the big picture matters... more than whether they are asking for something you think is important or doesn't even exist.
Thank you Diana.

They had to complete the inspection anyway so we can get the ISDS Use Permit transfer completed. Engineer (the original designer of this system) said replacing the whole field (which is already oversized apparently) would entirely depend on the drawings/plans for the expansion.

The offer was $15K over asking and was on the market for one day. We got three offers, one that the buyer's agent screwed up and would have affected us eventually, the other for slightly less, $10K over asking. These buyers presented a very clean contract offer, $200K to put down, no sale or other contingencies.

We would like to sell and be done... go to SWFL and get Harbor Hopper (whom we have already met and worked with) to help us find a place. Recently retired, looking to downsize from this very large house and acreage which is a whole lot of physical work... but not being forced to sell. We are ready and hopeful to begin a new life chapter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
I haven't witnessed inspectors flat out lying.
But, I have seen exceptional ineptitude many times.
I worry more about incoherent reports and inexperience moreso than lying.
We have another component to our story, but the buyers left it out of the Inspection Objection in the end, instead opting for the leach field proposition...

Initially our agent called to let us know the inspector said our roof was worn out. It is a 15 yr. old GAF 35 year Elk architectural style, that to us at least looked fine (but we are not experts). Then he called back an hour later to change the story to say the inspector says it is hail damaged beyond repair. We have had hail half a dozen miles from us in places, but we have been really lucky to avoid it. We found a roofing consultant to come out last night before it got dark to give us a second opinion. Roof is in very good condition for its age; no cracking, crazing, curling and especially NO evidence of storm damage of any kind. The roof vents, jacks and thin aluminum gas fireplace cap have no dents or dings. He sent us a copy of the report and within an hour the buyer's agent said they "would let the roof thing go." ???

So the stage was set... ugh. People...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2018, 11:32 AM
 
Location: 33950-bound
503 posts, read 227,371 times
Reputation: 779
Quote:
Originally Posted by petsandgardens View Post
Why do the inspectors lie like this? Are they bribed by buyers who want to 'make a deal'? Or, when they get to scaring buyers, are they claiming problems so contractor friends they refer to will make some money on it?
The last house we bought (granted 30 years ago) Mr. Twowilldo attended the inspection and had to point out all kinds of things the inspector was missing. Then again Mr. TWD also builds/renovates houses, so... there's that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2018, 11:48 AM
 
Location: 33950-bound
503 posts, read 227,371 times
Reputation: 779
Quote:
Originally Posted by rrah View Post
It's a silly request on the part of the buyers, but perhaps they were not aware of the need to expand the leach field should they add bedrooms until the inspector mentioned it. Some buyers see the inspection period as a time to renegotiate price matters. This is one of those buyers.

Just curious though. Does any of the marketing indicate that the basement can be finished with bedrooms and bathrooms?
Great observations... we think the buyers are using this time to renegotiate price and yes the inspector must have told them that (as he should have).

Marketing was straight up 3 beds/baths with unfinished basement. Nothing misleading there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2018, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Raleigh NC
7,781 posts, read 6,136,961 times
Reputation: 6905
Quote:
Originally Posted by twowilldo View Post
On the Inspection Objection document, the potential buyers are asking for us to allow some money back to them because at some point in the future they want to add more bedrooms and bathrooms in the currently unfinished basement. They obviously will need a larger leach field when they build it (if they do it).

Can someone explain to me what this has to do with an inspection? The current system is completely operational and has passed all inspections; it is the correct size/capacity for the current 3 bed/3bath home as it exists right now.
Of course it has nothing to do with repairs or objections. You marketed it as a 3 BR home, they bought it as a 3BR home.

There's only 2 things that matter:

1. what's the net after their request worth to you?
2. Does the contract even "allow" them to make such a request?

If you're in a slower market, and don't think you can get a better net offer, then negotiate.

If you're in a stronger market, have only recently begun, and would expect an equal or better offer without this balderdash, then tell them No and see what they do.

There's some slight reason to be concerned when they bring this crap in "after the fact" - that is, they could have and SHOULD have negotiated this between offer and contract. This might be the first of several attempts to renegotiate the contract and, if so, each time you'll get to decide whether to eventually accept.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2018, 12:03 PM
Status: "October is the eighth month" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Just south of Denver since 1989
10,683 posts, read 28,512,207 times
Reputation: 6847
OP is in my service area.

What else did they ask for? Is it reasonable to give in to a few other of their demands?

FYI, if you do not respond before the Resolution date, the deal terminates.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2018, 12:06 PM
 
10,276 posts, read 6,519,194 times
Reputation: 10857
Wait until they want you to upgrade your electrical panel so they can set up a grow house in your basement.

Or they want you to discount $50K to strip all the walls and floors because their cat is allergic to chemicals.


I'm in SW Florida by the way, where the OP wants to move, I love it here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top