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Old 06-25-2018, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
31,614 posts, read 55,349,802 times
Reputation: 30178

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverfall View Post
OP here is what I would do. I would put the onus on the buyer agent.

So if I was your agent here is what I would do.

1) All agents have to call me to make an appointment. During that phone call, I would explain that you have had damage to your personal items in the past including special gifts left on your furniture. I'd be really nice and diplomatic about it. I think agents will understand.
2) As such, the buyer agent needs to sign a form stating that they will supervise their clients and any children that they bring.
3) The buyer agent also agrees to replace/repair any items that were damaged during a showing.

You don't need to restrict children. The buyer agents will strongly encourage their buyers to not bring children, or require that they hold their hands while touring the home.

To all the people saying restrict kids, that isn't realistic. People relocating generally don't know anyone in the area. They have to bring their kids. In 15 years, I've only had to grab someone's child twice. 99% of parents do exactly what they should be doing. It's that last percent that cause issues for home sellers.

Also just because you are selling your home doesn't mean you need to put up with rude and inconsiderate behavior.

I know too many buyers agents who cannot make their car payment on time and think real estate is an expensive business...
So, they or their clients or clients' kids smash a $15000 sculpture...
Where does the compensation come from? You cannot get blood from a rock.

Not to mention the sense of loss of a prized possession.

To quote the spook in Amityville:
"Get out!"
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Old 06-25-2018, 09:33 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
4,157 posts, read 2,162,700 times
Reputation: 8091
Quote:
Originally Posted by namaste1717 View Post
Would someone please advise about the best solution for this potential problem in selling our home? Our house is very clean, neat, uncluttered, and easy to navigate. My husband and I would like to show our home with most of its furnishings, but we have a large art collection that we don't want kids to get to, including some very heavy, ornate statues, large urns, antique textiles, rare paintings, etc. During the sale of our last two houses, quite a few parents let their kids run through our homes unchecked, resulting in stained carpets and furniture, broken picture frames, uprooted plants, smashed vases, etc. Several children were scraped or gouged from trying to climb large statues, and one little boy had to be rescued from our lily pond by the realtor (the parents didn't notice).

My husband and I would like to avoid a similar experience when selling our present home. I've already packed any small objects that might be tempting for children to touch or pick up, but our home does show better with everything else in it; also, we need many of our furnishings to use while we're still living in the house. Our potential realtor is a very nice lady, but she has three small children and displays a "they're only kids, so put up with it" mindset.

Do any of you have advice about what we should tell our realtor, or how best to handle this situation? My husband adamantly doesn't want any children under the age of twelve anywhere on our property (yes, kids got to our patio and garden stuff, too) and is afraid we could be held liable for any injuries incurred. Is it even legal to ban young children from our property? Any constructive opinions and advice would be greatly appreciated.
I am of the opinion that you ought to be able to prohibit children from viewings.

Your home. Your stuff.

I would not want an agent who has the attitude you described, above. She is supposed to be working for you, not appealing to buyers who may be more like herself.

I have seen properties where "Principals only" is listed. To me, that means only the people who can sign the documents to purchase the home, not their children or friends or extended family.
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Old 06-25-2018, 09:57 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
4,157 posts, read 2,162,700 times
Reputation: 8091
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schmooky View Post
Thatís simply not an option for a lot of families. If youíre away from any support system in a new town, trying to find a home, you canít leave your young children at home while you property shop. And getting under contract with a property you havenít even walked through it sheer idiocy.

Itís not the children are on some pedestal, itís literally not doable. I speak as someone who was just in this position, and believe you me Iíd rather have walked through everything without my kids along. But when you have no friends, no family, and no connections because youíre clear across the country in a new state? Your five year old comes along.

And believe it or not, they can do it without ruining a house. We havenít EVER damaged or disturbed a property we walked through, and there are eight of us. It is doable, and I think parents and realtors do have a responsibility to respect the properties they walk through, but a seller who is this insanely concerned needs to do what they can on their end too. Putting away the things not in daily use goes a long way.
I tried to read calmly through your post in its entirety, and at first it seemed to make some sense when you said it was not practical to look without the children as you are "clear across the country in a new state," but even that doesn't make sense.

1. Surely there was a time during the considering of said move that a flight to the new state was made or could have been made without eight people (are you saying two parents and six kids?).

2. Referring to a very concerned homeowner as the OP as "insanely concerned" is rude and very unproductive.
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Old 06-25-2018, 10:13 PM
 
Location: DFW
188 posts, read 49,305 times
Reputation: 326
Why does the house show better with all that stuff in it? Are the buyers getting those art pieces with the house?? If not then pack it all up!! Best way to avoid the situation os to not have one at all. Pack it up!
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Old 06-26-2018, 03:39 AM
 
Location: Florida
18,290 posts, read 18,550,890 times
Reputation: 20975
Have leashes available just inside the front door.
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Old 06-26-2018, 07:32 AM
 
2,045 posts, read 951,931 times
Reputation: 3574
Usually when I hear of situations like this (speaking generally now, not specifically about the OP) I feel like there may be deeper issues and the buyers haven't fully disengaged emotionally from the property

When I hear of sellers putting up roadblocks like this, my first thought is always that this house is not *truly* for sale yet

When I see things in the listing like "Seller must find housing first" "Seller needs six months to close" Outrageous listing prices are another red flag....the sellers usually have a lot of unpacking to do and it's not into their new home

These types of sellers are often wasting everyone's time because they aren't ready to sell yet

Last edited by bookspage; 06-26-2018 at 07:41 AM..
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Old 06-26-2018, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Ohio
4,083 posts, read 1,470,142 times
Reputation: 3215
Quote:
Originally Posted by namaste1717 View Post
Would someone please advise about the best solution for this potential problem in selling our home? Our house is very clean, neat, uncluttered, and easy to navigate. My husband and I would like to show our home with most of its furnishings, but we have a large art collection that we don't want kids to get to, including some very heavy, ornate statues, large urns, antique textiles, rare paintings, etc. During the sale of our last two houses, quite a few parents let their kids run through our homes unchecked, resulting in stained carpets and furniture, broken picture frames, uprooted plants, smashed vases, etc. Several children were scraped or gouged from trying to climb large statues, and one little boy had to be rescued from our lily pond by the realtor (the parents didn't notice).

My husband and I would like to avoid a similar experience when selling our present home. I've already packed any small objects that might be tempting for children to touch or pick up, but our home does show better with everything else in it; also, we need many of our furnishings to use while we're still living in the house. Our potential realtor is a very nice lady, but she has three small children and displays a "they're only kids, so put up with it" mindset.

Do any of you have advice about what we should tell our realtor, or how best to handle this situation? My husband adamantly doesn't want any children under the age of twelve anywhere on our property (yes, kids got to our patio and garden stuff, too) and is afraid we could be held liable for any injuries incurred. Is it even legal to ban young children from our property? Any constructive opinions and advice would be greatly appreciated.
Any potential buyer going through your house is like gold. With or without children. It really comes down to how serious you are about wanting to sell your house. If it were me I'd be storing any truly valuable art objects and replacing them with something cheaper if it's really necessary. My guess is this realtor has been down the path many times and understands that all traffic is good traffic. Selling a house is a royal pain in the behind, there is no getting around that fact. You WILL make sacrifices to accommodate potential buyers, or it may sit on the market a long, long time.
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Old 06-26-2018, 08:18 AM
 
Location: USA
41 posts, read 14,604 times
Reputation: 101
Many thanks for (most of) the comments. My husband and I have decided what to do and are proceeding accordingly. We appreciate (almost) everyone's time and input. Thank you again!
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Old 06-26-2018, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Salem, OR
13,745 posts, read 31,577,375 times
Reputation: 12105
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
I know too many buyers agents who cannot make their car payment on time and think real estate is an expensive business...
So, they or their clients or clients' kids smash a $15000 sculpture...
Where does the compensation come from? You cannot get blood from a rock.

Not to mention the sense of loss of a prized possession.

To quote the spook in Amityville:
"Get out!"
I agree many agents have no means, but just discussing it and asking for accountability will solve the problem I think.
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Old 06-26-2018, 10:56 AM
 
1,459 posts, read 333,227 times
Reputation: 1667
Quote:
Originally Posted by namaste1717 View Post
Would someone please advise about the best solution for this potential problem in selling our home? Our house is very clean, neat, uncluttered, and easy to navigate. My husband and I would like to show our home with most of its furnishings, but we have a large art collection that we don't want kids to get to, including some very heavy, ornate statues, large urns, antique textiles, rare paintings, etc. During the sale of our last two houses, quite a few parents let their kids run through our homes unchecked, resulting in stained carpets and furniture, broken picture frames, uprooted plants, smashed vases, etc. Several children were scraped or gouged from trying to climb large statues, and one little boy had to be rescued from our lily pond by the realtor (the parents didn't notice).

My husband and I would like to avoid a similar experience when selling our present home. I've already packed any small objects that might be tempting for children to touch or pick up, but our home does show better with everything else in it; also, we need many of our furnishings to use while we're still living in the house. Our potential realtor is a very nice lady, but she has three small children and displays a "they're only kids, so put up with it" mindset.

Do any of you have advice about what we should tell our realtor, or how best to handle this situation? My husband adamantly doesn't want any children under the age of twelve anywhere on our property (yes, kids got to our patio and garden stuff, too) and is afraid we could be held liable for any injuries incurred. Is it even legal to ban young children from our property? Any constructive opinions and advice would be greatly appreciated.
Or you could...



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QaGk2ML6bK0
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