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Old 07-01-2018, 04:03 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
1,695 posts, read 775,044 times
Reputation: 3577

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
I marketed my brother's home as a FSBO...

The local Realtors came by and had lots of ideas... one is a family friend and was a little miffed.

The combined wisdom gleaned was all the stained wood doors, trim and cabinets needed to by painted white... mind you... I put in all the stain grade wood... and Marvin and Anderson windows and they were pristine.

The outside was also pristine with loads of curb appeal...

To make a long story short... I held the home open one twice with home open signs and listed in the newspaper Home Open section.

It was a traffic jam... we said all offers would be reviewed in 7 days... had 12 and all over... one older couple really wanted it and made an all cash offer subject to inspection...

Home, Roof, Chimney were clear... Home said he couldn't believe the home had not been on the market in 24 years... Pest had $280 of work... shower door gasket and 6" of garage trim.

Set a new record price and by $150k.

Some said we were lucky and that maybe... but, I would have considered it a crime to paint stain grade wood... especially after all the painstaking work I did... no fillers used anywhere.

The buyers said they were tired of viewing homes where everything is painted... they appreciated the attention to detail and all the stain grade materials used.

Congratulations! It's always a relief to sell a home, especially so easily. May the same good luck come our way.
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Old 07-01-2018, 04:09 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
1,695 posts, read 775,044 times
Reputation: 3577
Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Annie View Post
It's too late for those wanting to buy a house and be in it before schools start.


It misses the summer buying season altogether.


It is often hurricane season - therefore rain and mud and icky shoes.


It's only 2 months before the holidays begin.



LOL,the last hurricane to come through was in 2003 and that barely grazed us. Not really an issue in these parts.



September is actually a good time to sell around here; around here it's the summer months that you want to avoid. I guess it's different in different parts of the country. Although spring brings out the most buyers for school reasons, as you noted, realtors here say fall can be better in some ways. If not, we can always rent it out again and wait until spring, LOL.
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Old 07-01-2018, 04:37 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
1,695 posts, read 775,044 times
Reputation: 3577
Quote:
Originally Posted by emotiioo View Post
Painting is so easy to do on your own....
In some houses, perhaps. An older house with small rooms and low ceilings, for example. Our house has dramatic 2-story walls, tricky angles, and all kinds of funny areas such as grand staircases and windows that need to be worked around. Loved the house but I do admit it's a bear to paint. Especially for a senior citizen who really shouldn't be on ladders anymore.


You made me think of a side issue that I think is worth discussing: the value of hiring professionals.



I'm very much a DIY when it comes to fixing up my own house for my own pleasure. But preparing a house for sale is a different matter. Just my opinion, but I think this is one of those things you want to hire professionals to do, or don't do it at all. It really does look lot a LOT better, and I think it makes a difference in how fast a home may or may not sell.


We looked at a huge number of homes last year when we were shopping, and it really hit home that we could always tell which homes were painted professionally, and which were amateur DIY jobs. We followed the progress of many of these homes, and I noticed the ones with lots of DIY work seemed to have trouble selling. Maybe in a super hot market it wouldn't matter, but if you're in an moderately warm or cool market that's not something you'd want to cut corners on.



OTOH, if you want to try doing some of the house yourself and you're a good painter, I could see that as an option that might work. Smaller low-ceiling rooms such as bedrooms and basements might be ok to paint yourself. But if you're going to have the bigger "show" rooms anyway, why not have the pros do the whole job? When you crunch the numbers, the cost of adding them into the job vs doing it yourself isn't that much of a savings.


I personally think this is one of those things that you want to have done professionally or you're better off not doing it at all. But again, just my two cents.



Quote:
Originally Posted by emotiioo View Post
Agree there is a lot of overthinking.
To each his own. So far "over thinking" has worked out well for us.
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Old 07-01-2018, 05:08 AM
 
3,052 posts, read 1,216,716 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piney Creek View Post
All good things to consider, and yes, we did consider them before taking the plunge. For us, it helped to look at other homes for sale and see what happened when they went grey. That was also a good way to gauge how many rooms to paint and whether or not to do the job ourselves. In the end, I followed the realtor's advice, and I think she was right.



One good thing about grey is it doesn't clash. It changed the feeling of some rooms, and possibly made a few rooms seem smaller, but clashing wasn't an issue. At least, with our house.
I am confused. How many homes are on the market, get taken off, and come back on with only a coat of paint to make things gray? I would guess not many. If the choice is between an updated gray place and one that hasnít been updated since 1984 and is minimally cheaper and not gray, the paint isnít what is going to put it over the edge.
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Old 07-01-2018, 05:23 AM
 
1,778 posts, read 877,752 times
Reputation: 3812
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piney Creek View Post
In some houses, perhaps. An older house with small rooms and low ceilings, for example. Our house has dramatic 2-story walls, tricky angles, and all kinds of funny areas such as grand staircases and windows that need to be worked around. Loved the house but I do admit it's a bear to paint. Especially for a senior citizen who really shouldn't be on ladders anymore.


You made me think of a side issue that I think is worth discussing: the value of hiring professionals.



I'm very much a DIY when it comes to fixing up my own house for my own pleasure. But preparing a house for sale is a different matter. Just my opinion, but I think this is one of those things you want to hire professionals to do, or don't do it at all. It really does look lot a LOT better, and I think it makes a difference in how fast a home may or may not sell.


We looked at a huge number of homes last year when we were shopping, and it really hit home that we could always tell which homes were painted professionally, and which were amateur DIY jobs. We followed the progress of many of these homes, and I noticed the ones with lots of DIY work seemed to have trouble selling. Maybe in a super hot market it wouldn't matter, but if you're in an moderately warm or cool market that's not something you'd want to cut corners on.



OTOH, if you want to try doing some of the house yourself and you're a good painter, I could see that as an option that might work. Smaller low-ceiling rooms such as bedrooms and basements might be ok to paint yourself. But if you're going to have the bigger "show" rooms anyway, why not have the pros do the whole job? When you crunch the numbers, the cost of adding them into the job vs doing it yourself isn't that much of a savings.


I personally think this is one of those things that you want to have done professionally or you're better off not doing it at all. But again, just my two cents.



To each his own. So far "over thinking" has worked out well for us.
Oh puhlease.

There it is, the house brag! The OP is always going on about this white elephant property and what to do with it. Rent it? Sell it? Its in such a great area! And you know, so BIG and luxurious because, well, they have a little money (very tony neighborhood donchaknow). But those darn young people don't want to live in a house like this. There have been so many threads about this house and the color the realtor suggested (some kind of awful green at one point.) Obviously the OP is obsessing but not before telling C-D once again about this amazing home that she can't seem to divest herself of.

I guess if you are terrible at painting, you can tell the difference between a pro and an amateur. My current home has 12 foot ceilings. Last one had a very dramatic staircase with two story ceilings. Both were older, so you got that right-- plaster walls just soak up paint unlike drywall, so that is a challenge. But we have had 12 houses in a decade and quite confident in our ability to paint. We can set up scaffolds, use sprayers, and I defy a professional to tape better than I do. If you hadn't painted in 20 YEARS and it was WHITE you are very very long overdue. But yeah, spend the money.
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Old 07-01-2018, 05:58 AM
 
Location: Dayton, OH
504 posts, read 199,354 times
Reputation: 2126
In my mind, gray paint=primer.

If I bought your house, I would be repainting in more pleasing soft colors.

To each his own.
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Old 07-01-2018, 06:07 AM
 
4,818 posts, read 5,445,897 times
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If I were a realtor and thought a seller needed to neutralize their paint colors, I'd advise a greige color in most cases.

Gray can look great if there is a lot of fresh white trim to offset it, but greige is the most versatile neutral.

That said, sometimes you have to go with a tan color if you have permanent hard elements that are super warm-toned.
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Old 07-01-2018, 06:53 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
1,695 posts, read 775,044 times
Reputation: 3577
Quote:
Originally Posted by RamenAddict View Post
I am confused. How many homes are on the market, get taken off, and come back on with only a coat of paint to make things gray? I would guess not many. If the choice is between an updated gray place and one that hasn’t been updated since 1984 and is minimally cheaper and not gray, the paint isn’t what is going to put it over the edge.

I'm not sure if this is what you're asking, but here's what I based it on. It's admittedly a nonscientific personal observation, but FWIW we've spent a few years watching the various houses in our market as they go for sale. Most seem to take 1 few weeks to maybe 2 months to sell. There have been a few that lingered on the market for many months. I'm not sure why, they seemed like nice houses to me. Most had issues with "looking dated" in some way or another. (I'm not sure if this was the reason, other houses that looked equally dated sold quickly. But that's the only thing I could guess was an issue) Of these, some got the grey paint job and then they seemed to sell quickly.



Was this the reason or a coincidence? I don't know, it's just something that I observed that helped convince us there is value in going grey.



FWIW, the other thing that also moved those houses that weren't selling was a major price drop. In fact that probably had more affect than the color change. But we thought we'd go for the grey first, and see what happens.
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Old 07-01-2018, 07:07 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
1,695 posts, read 775,044 times
Reputation: 3577
Quote:
Originally Posted by OHNot4Me View Post
In my mind, gray paint=primer.

If I bought your house, I would be repainting in more pleasing soft colors.

To each his own.

Ha ha, me too. Personally, I like the pastel tropical colors. Not everyone's taste but what do I care?
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Old 07-01-2018, 10:22 AM
 
4,866 posts, read 2,158,779 times
Reputation: 12399
In my dining room design....it's going to be a southern salute to the old south. Blue and grey thru napkins,wall art. But nope! Nada to grey on walls. It's such a depressing color by itself.
Maybe the new owners can find a way to incorporate it to there taste.

Glad your making peace with this choice. It's an investment.
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