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Old 02-09-2019, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,852 posts, read 58,555,788 times
Reputation: 53013

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They're just as cookie cutter. It's the "Mc" that's the defining part of the phrase, not the "mansion" or "modern".

Quote:
Originally Posted by likealady View Post
I'm not understanding, it's still a McMansion, it just looks different.
Exactly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by safak View Post
I for one would much prefer a McRowhome in the city, a 50's style McCapeCod, or even a 80's era McSplitEntry over one of those cookie cutter McMansions.
LOL - Love it!!

I live in a McRowHome (technically a McTwin) and would love to live in a McSplitEntry or a McTriLevel!

My former house was a 1920s McBungalow (technically a McKitHouse).

Isn't it funny how no one calls developments full of 1920s bungalows, 1950s Cape Cods, or 1970s ranches "cookie cutter" - even though they most certainly are.
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Old 02-09-2019, 02:03 PM
 
Location: ATL -> HOU -> DAL
4,239 posts, read 3,380,210 times
Reputation: 3289
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Isn't it funny how no one calls developments full of 1920s bungalows, 1950s Cape Cods, or 1970s ranches "cookie cutter" - even though they most certainly are.
I'm glad I'm not the only one that thinks this. People act like all suburbs are cookie cutter while cities are these beacons of originality. Look at this street in Baltimore. They're all the same! I've seen something similar in a lot of other cities.

Fact is you can drive through parts of cities or suburbs and basically tell when/what era that development is from. It's funny you mention 70s ranches cause I can think of plenty of places from my home county that are full of them. Then you start seeing some areas that have a lot of 80s era, then 90s era (like where I used to live) and then finally the developments from this century.

Generally the exceptions are tear downs where a new house is built in its place. That happened to my dad's old house from the 70s. My aunt's former neighborhood in Atlanta has been undergoing gentrification and having mid century homes and older being torn down. Then of course you have individual houses being built outside of any subdivisions.
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Old 02-09-2019, 06:52 PM
 
3,418 posts, read 2,994,563 times
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We have some of the 'modern' looking houses around my neighborhood. They are probably 4000+ sqft. I personally find them hideous. They stand out because they build them among more traditional looking McMansions with brick and rock exteriors. The 'modern' houses tend to have painted exteriors which means maintenance because they will mold on the north side after a few years and need to be repainted. I can understand wanting something with clean lines, but these houses have no curb appeal. They don't look practical either.
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Old 02-09-2019, 09:48 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
18,092 posts, read 22,498,631 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by likealady View Post
I'm not understanding, it's still a McMansion, it just looks different. The article doesn't state the typical sq footage of the McModern homes, but they're probably just as big. And yes, flat roofs suck, but I like modern design and always have.
Looks suspicially like a McMansion to me, also.

There is a renewed interest in modern design - especially mid century modern. Most of the millennial who I know are not interested in overly large houses.

Many like it industrial loft style, also. Or a blend of the two.

I love modern design, but flat roofs are impractical in general, and I don't find them that appealing. They might do well in a desert.
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Old 02-10-2019, 06:09 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
2,710 posts, read 1,207,456 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post

Isn't it funny how no one calls developments full of 1920s bungalows, 1950s Cape Cods, or 1970s ranches "cookie cutter" - even though they most certainly are.

So true! In fact those older neighborhoods often had a whole line of houses that were exact duplicates, even down to things like awnings and shutters.

Whereas the modern developments do try to break things up a little by having 5-6 or more different designs, as well as variations within each design. Floor plans are also frequently done in reverse (In other words, for one house the garage might be on the left side, bay windows on the right side; down the street you see the same design but with the bay windows on the left and the garage on the right side.
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Old 02-10-2019, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
25,746 posts, read 61,283,957 times
Reputation: 28846
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seduflow View Post
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2...38044964_zpid/ and https://www.zillow.com/homes/recentl...ect/12_zm/2_p/

I guess this could be called a McModern (this was built in an expensive town!!)? I've been seeing a lot of these types around NJ. I don't think they are all necessarily with flat lines.
Wow. That is extra special ugly. Hope this does not take off.
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Old 02-10-2019, 08:25 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
25,746 posts, read 61,283,957 times
Reputation: 28846
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piney Creek View Post
So true! In fact those older neighborhoods often had a whole line of houses that were exact duplicates, even down to things like awnings and shutters.

Whereas the modern developments do try to break things up a little by having 5-6 or more different designs, as well as variations within each design. Floor plans are also frequently done in reverse (In other words, for one house the garage might be on the left side, bay windows on the right side; down the street you see the same design but with the bay windows on the left and the garage on the right side.
The older houses were pleasant to look at, and even in masse included interesting elements. Sometimes it was the group as a whole that provided the appealing look, like row-houses. Today's houses are just blagh. If not outright ugly they are boring ot look at or in the case of McMansions, ridiculous looking.
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Old 02-10-2019, 09:37 AM
46H
 
913 posts, read 530,019 times
Reputation: 1747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Isn't it funny how no one calls developments full of 1920s bungalows, 1950s Cape Cods, or 1970s ranches "cookie cutter" - even though they most certainly are.
Everybody but you calls these older houses cookie cutter houses. These developments have been called cookie cutter houses since they existed. Here is the 1947 Levittown cookie cutter version:

https://www.google.com/search?q=levi...w=1536&bih=750

https://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/19/opinion/19wed4.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tract_housing
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Old 02-10-2019, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,852 posts, read 58,555,788 times
Reputation: 53013
Quote:
Originally Posted by 46H View Post
Everybody but you calls these older houses cookie cutter houses.
Thank you for the history lesson.

If you were aware of housing trends, you'd know that people moving into established developments, into 1920s bungalow and four square neighborhoods, have been disparaging modern McMansions as cookie cutter - and without a trace of irony.
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Old 02-10-2019, 10:50 AM
 
303 posts, read 175,125 times
Reputation: 789
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
They're just as cookie cutter. It's the "Mc" that's the defining part of the phrase, not the "mansion" or "modern".


Exactly.


LOL - Love it!!

I live in a McRowHome (technically a McTwin) and would love to live in a McSplitEntry or a McTriLevel!

My former house was a 1920s McBungalow (technically a McKitHouse).

Isn't it funny how no one calls developments full of 1920s bungalows, 1950s Cape Cods, or 1970s ranches "cookie cutter" - even though they most certainly are.
I do! We live in a village and at a point where it was a farming village but became a large town. There are houses from the 1700s and farmhouses outlying with their farmland eventually sold off for development. Our house is the last farmhouse before the post-war ranches. Thankfully, there were several styles of capes, cape colonials, and ranches though and the trees quickly grew back. Many were never cut down at all. Still, it's an awful lot of ranches and the original owners HATE trees. You can tell which ones are those who had them built. They want their lot CLEAR and are extremely offended by leaves. lol - leaf blowers blowing during ALL of autumn, until the first snow. It makes their ranch look even more cookie cutter. There's no personality to it. They look brand-new. A clear lot with a rectangular box set on perfect grass. Most of them are probably in such good health from the amount of work it takes to keep half an acre perfectly clear for 70 years, right to their tagged property lines. :P
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