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Old 02-27-2019, 07:48 AM
 
303 posts, read 175,125 times
Reputation: 789

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Some people want modern... and some people simply buy modern because they don't know how to/have no confidence in their ability to fix anything. And neither do their families. I'm seeing an awful lot of people who bemoan how expensive it is to own a home because they can't even imagine doing something like replacing some doorknobs, patching drywall, or snaking drains. These are people with parents who were successful and hired people to do those things... but their kids don't have those jobs available and their expenses are much higher. No family with those skills to show them how.

It's all on Youtube, people. lol
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Old 02-27-2019, 10:21 AM
 
669 posts, read 517,338 times
Reputation: 930
We have a custom built prairie style home and love it. It has the craftsman style throughout. The roof is lower pitched, and our utilities are very reasonable. We don't really have an attic just a crawl space and its well insulated maybe thats why. My house has an interior courtyard one of my favorite things about the house we own. And we have 60 windows, it lets in a lot of light which is one thing I told my husband I wanted in a new home. I love looking outside. We don't have to turn on lights our house isn't dark inside. Strangely with all those windows our electric is still very reasonable compared to homes that are similar in size or even a 1000 sq ft smaller. Our highest ever utility bill was 250 that was the hottest summer . We have 2 back porches.
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Old 02-27-2019, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC
2,695 posts, read 1,316,665 times
Reputation: 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonathanLB View Post
What is with this constant obsession with calling everything a “cookie cutter” home?! In the market we are moving, which is a cheap West Coast city, custom home design STARTS at $2 million. One day, I’ll do that. But like 99.9% of people, I’ll be living in a house designed by an architect for a building company. That’s literally how the world works. EVERYONE uses an iPhone or Android or whatever right?! They don’t custom design their own freaking phones. Houses are no different!

More to the point here, yes most buyers don’t want anything that isn’t modern, no it’s NOT true that the “building materials are cheap.” No, they’re not. Most modern homes are build better than their cheaper, “contemporary” counterparts, at least 2x6 construction, more use of wood and tile rather than carpet, metal for stair rails, etc. The quality of most modern homes is way better and that’s why they’re more expensive. In most markets now, nobody wants old, dated architecture if they can avoid it. I wouldn’t buy a home that wasn’t modern. I don’t want a pitched roof, I don’t want crown moulding, I want clean lines and nice architecture that looks great not dated.
TBH, the only people I ever see who complain about something being "cookie cutter" are those folks who don't own a home yet and still renting an apartment of some sort...which also, ironically, is very cookie cutter. It's human nature to rag on something that you yourself don't have that others do.

When I bought my townhouse a few years ago, friends complained it was too far away from the city in the burbs and very generic. 5 years later....they ended up buying the same style generic house out in the suburbs themselves.


I think there are definitely different styles of housing, moreso "contemporary" houses on the west coast vs. the traditional "colonial" look on the east coast. But that's really about it.

I buy a house for space, comfort, location and price. That's really about it, as a millennial that this article is referring to. But the main factor is solely cost.
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Old 02-27-2019, 10:59 AM
 
2,157 posts, read 1,437,303 times
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As an older Millennials I have made the comment of "I don't want a house in subdivision where all the house look alike" and to be honest, sometimes I do find it dreadful but other times its not so bad due to the sq foot and modern amenities one gets. But there is the cost factor too, I rather buy a old "charming' (aka small & cheaper house) because that is all I need now & use rest of the money to travel or not worry about mortgage. Then buy a bigger house when I have kids (need for more space).


But then again, many of my friends already have kids & have been moving in to new build subdivisions with cookie-cutter house with open space which are great for hosting parties.......... and I feel little left out. I want the fancy house too but then I remember:
1) I don't need it now, they do: different stage in life
2) No one host parties much because of kids & other priorities. That once a year event is not good enough reason to buy a bigger place. I am better than that: buying things to show off or for other people
3) I think about the financial stress those houses bring especially since many of my friends are single income because of little babies. I am terrified of financial stress, debt, and recession.
4) Having a small space feels romantic & gives me opportunity to HGTV-it with renovation idea & time to learn about house maintenance.


Eventually all millennial will move into those ugly McMansions, its matter of having the money & having the need for that much space
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Old 02-27-2019, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC
2,695 posts, read 1,316,665 times
Reputation: 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by keraT View Post
As an older Millennials I have made the comment of "I don't want a house in subdivision where all the house look alike" and to be honest, sometimes I do find it dreadful but other times its not so bad due to the sq foot and modern amenities one gets. But there is the cost factor too, I rather buy a old "charming' (aka small & cheaper house) because that is all I need now & use rest of the money to travel or not worry about mortgage. Then buy a bigger house when I have kids (need for more space).


But then again, many of my friends already have kids & have been moving in to new build subdivisions with cookie-cutter house with open space which are great for hosting parties.......... and I feel little left out. I want the fancy house too but then I remember:
1) I don't need it now, they do: different stage in life
2) No one host parties much because of kids & other priorities. That once a year event is not good enough reason to buy a bigger place. I am better than that: buying things to show off or for other people
3) I think about the financial stress those houses bring especially since many of my friends are single income because of little babies. I am terrified of financial stress, debt, and recession.
4) Having a small space feels romantic & gives me opportunity to HGTV-it with renovation idea & time to learn about house maintenance.


Eventually all millennial will move into those ugly McMansions, its matter of having the money & having the need for that much space
Very great points! I think a lot of it too depends on where you are in life. A single person or a dating couple have much different life perspectives than those who have 2-3 kids and need the extra rooms and space for their growing family.
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Old 02-28-2019, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
10,481 posts, read 9,754,631 times
Reputation: 13668
- I don't want a modern home. Let me repeat I DON'T WANT TO LIVE IN A MODERN HOME. Our home is pushing 30, and would have no problem selling despite competition from newer homes. It was built very well, that's why it has withstood the test of time and has held up well.

- I don't like wide open space and rooms basically series of boxes.

- Character was first and foremost on our list of requirements. We are early 40s. We do not live in a cookie cutter house or a cookie cutter development, yet we didn't pay over a million dollars. We got a decently sized suburban lot to hold said house too. The home wasn't designed by us but nearly everything about it feels as if it were. I get warm feelings whenever I'm in my house.
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Old Yesterday, 09:01 AM
 
Location: VT-> NY-> CT
8,771 posts, read 5,018,619 times
Reputation: 14304
Quote:
Originally Posted by riaelise View Post
- I don't want a modern home. Let me repeat I DON'T WANT TO LIVE IN A MODERN HOME. Our home is pushing 30, and would have no problem selling despite competition from newer homes. It was built very well, that's why it has withstood the test of time and has held up well.

- I don't like wide open space and rooms basically series of boxes.

- Character was first and foremost on our list of requirements. We are early 40s. We do not live in a cookie cutter house or a cookie cutter development, yet we didn't pay over a million dollars. We got a decently sized suburban lot to hold said house too. The home wasn't designed by us but nearly everything about it feels as if it were. I get warm feelings whenever I'm in my house.
Ditto. My house is 80+ years old, and I love every quirk and imperfection. It actually took us a long time to find a house we love, because most have been gutted and renovated, so nearly wept with joy when we found this one with all of the original woodworking, crown moldings, etc. The kitchen, bath, and windows are new, through. The icing on the cake was that we were able to pick it up fairly inexpensively (probably 40k below comps) because the previous owner did such a poor job maintaining the plumbing and heating, but we love it because we did not want anything big or modern.
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Old Yesterday, 06:11 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
1,690 posts, read 3,057,523 times
Reputation: 2836
I am not a millennial - - I was born in 1948, which I guess makes me an early baby boomer. That said, I think all of these houses shown in the article are hideous. I wouldn't live in any of them.

Three years ago I bought my dream home and I love living in it so much. "What it it?", you may ask? "Is it a McMansion?" LOL

It's a 1965 brick ranch home on a slab, 2/2/1500 with a detached garage. Very little updating was done on it so it cost much less than I had planned on spending. I love the older finishes though (nostalgia, I suppose). I love the fact that my neighbors are older, like I am, maybe because it is an older neighborhood. I love the fact that my home has already been modified to be elderly/disabled friendly, with grab bars, wide doorways, and so on, perfect for living out one's later years in life.

I suppose that I downsized since I went from a 1600 sf home to a 1500 sf home. The couple that bought my previous home (built in 1972) was aged about 30 and were expecting their first baby.

Honestly I think that this type of article is all clickbait, and does not apply to most parts of the country. Also it has no resemblance to reality as far as I can tell. People buy what they need and can afford. Also most are looking for location, location, location.
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Old Today, 05:17 PM
 
62 posts, read 15,796 times
Reputation: 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonathanLB View Post
Most modern homes are build better than their cheaper, “contemporary” counterparts, at least 2x6 construction, more use of wood and tile rather than carpet, metal for stair rails, etc. The quality of most modern homes is way better and that’s why they’re more expensive.



Maybe, but probably not. Sure, modern code has forced certain aspects of building to be much better, but the workmanship is usually pretty poor. The big builders do their best to crank out as many homes as possible in the shortest time for the cheapest they can. That almost always leads to shortcuts, under-qualified sub contractors, and problems where they can be hidden under flashy finishes.
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Old Today, 07:18 PM
 
1 posts
Reputation: 10
Seems like some on this thread are confusing "new construction" with "modern design"
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