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Old Yesterday, 05:05 PM
 
460 posts, read 1,051,705 times
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https://www.businessinsider.com/mill...cmodern-2017-8


https://www.treehugger.com/green-arc...mcmoderns.html


Have you noticed an increase in more modern style housing developments?
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Old Yesterday, 05:09 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,041 posts, read 40,470,445 times
Reputation: 42119
You had to start a new thread when this would have fit in to you previous one?
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Old Yesterday, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
2,422 posts, read 1,082,727 times
Reputation: 5831
Interesting looking buildings. It must be more of a west coast thing, the new construction out my way doesn't have that particular look (yet, any way) and I've never heard this term before. But lots of trends start in the west, it'll be fun to see if they spread out my way as well.

I'm not sure you can say Millennials are "ditching cookie cutter houses", by the way, since these are also cookie cutter designs. I think we have to face the reality that cookie cutter houses are going to be the norm no matter what design changes come along. Especially if an entire generation is embracing this design, because let's face it, if this is the only kind of house Millennials want to buy, that means you're going to have entire developments of these houses. Very few first time buyers can afford to hire an architect, no matter how much they may say they hate the idea of living in a cookie cutter. It also seems like an overstatement to say Millennials as a group are "ditching McMansions for McModerns" considering I see hundreds, if not thousands, of McMansions still being built. Somebody is buying them, whether fashionable or not. Even in the west.

But all that aside, it's nice to see a new design emerging and I hope we see more of them. I wish they could come up with a name that was a little more original, but maybe that will emerge over time.

I like the look, with it's square cut, flat roofs, and fewer embellishments, and even though it's not my personal taste I can see the attraction. I especially like the windows, and I definitely like them better than the tiny houses, which at one point were being predicted as a possible big wave of the future. I'm not sure I like the practicality of flat roofs, but I'm sure builders will figure that one out as this design becomes more popular.


ps. Although an interesting article, I'm not sure Treehugger is the best source of reliable real estate information. Do you have any others?

Last edited by Piney Creek; Yesterday at 06:23 PM..
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Old Yesterday, 06:09 PM
 
1,010 posts, read 460,263 times
Reputation: 2591

The second article was a gem - Treehugger always has interesting things to say.
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Old Yesterday, 06:28 PM
 
Location: NC
6,144 posts, read 7,338,923 times
Reputation: 12230
The name of the game today in house design is "cheap and quick". I don't think anyone loves the mass produced houses today. They are repetitive of just a couple design elements chosen because they are easy for framers to put up.

So whether the style is contemporary or modern they are doomed to be as boring as all get out. And as the treehugger article points out new design houses, no matter the style, totally ignore the "rules" of balance and proportion that in the past made looking at individual homes so satisfying. Today you may as well throw up boxes with little tented roofs since they almost are identical. All the personality of a home ends up being on the inside and even that has become overly predictable. Are we losing the ability to discern what is attractive? Or have buyers just had to give up since there is nothing beautiful out there.
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Old Yesterday, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Ohio
14,539 posts, read 12,926,104 times
Reputation: 19745
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piney Creek View Post
Interesting looking buildings. It must be more of a west coast thing, the new construction out my way doesn't have that particular look (yet, any way) and I've never heard this term before. But lots of trends start in the west, it'll be fun to see if they spread out my way as well.

I'm not sure you can say Millennials are "ditching cookie cutter houses", by the way, since these are also cookie cutter designs. I think we have to face the reality that cookie cutter houses are going to be the norm no matter what design changes come along. Especially if an entire generation is embracing this design, because let's face it, if this is the only kind of house Millennials want to buy, that means you're going to have entire developments of these houses. Very few first time buyers can afford to hire an architect, no matter how much they may say they hate the idea of living in a cookie cutter. It also seems like an overstatement to say Millennials as a group are "ditching McMansions for McModerns" considering I see hundreds, if not thousands, of McMansions still being built. Somebody is buying them, whether fashionable or not. Even in the west.

But all that aside, it's nice to see a new design emerging and I hope we see more of them. I wish they could come up with a name that was a little more original, but maybe that will emerge over time.

I like the look, with it's square cut, flat roofs, and fewer embellishments, and even though it's not my personal taste I can see the attraction. I especially like the windows, and I definitely like them better than the tiny houses, which at one point were being predicted as a possible big wave of the future. I'm not sure I like the practicality of flat roofs, but I'm sure builders will figure that one out as this design becomes more popular.


ps. Although an interesting article, I'm not sure Treehugger is the best source of reliable real estate information. Do you have any others?
Nothing practical about flat roofs if you live where it snows.
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Old Yesterday, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
4,455 posts, read 2,425,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie53 View Post
Nothing practical about flat roofs if you live where it snows.

Or rains.
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Old Yesterday, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Floribama
14,048 posts, read 30,206,614 times
Reputation: 12653
Boxy looking houses like that wouldn’t sell very well where I live. Pseudo-craftsman style seems to be the latest thing here.
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Old Yesterday, 10:36 PM
 
460 posts, read 1,051,705 times
Reputation: 306
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2...38044964_zpid/ and https://www.zillow.com/homes/recentl...ect/12_zm/2_p/

I guess this could be called a McModern (this was built in an expensive town!!)? I've been seeing a lot of these types around NJ. I don't think they are all necessarily with flat lines.
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Old Yesterday, 11:00 PM
 
16,377 posts, read 3,466,623 times
Reputation: 4807
Im a millennial and I would much rather have a McMansion than a McModern.
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