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View Poll Results: Living next to or near a cemetery.
OK for the most part 52 68.42%
Kind of depressing 4 5.26%
Something else (explain in comments) 20 26.32%
Voters: 76. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-09-2019, 10:44 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
Extremely bad Feng Shui, with the spirits flying around.
Spirits aren't generally connected with cemeteries, since they weren't places to which they were connected in life. They're already dead when they get there, and the spirit has left.

I would love to live by a cemetery. Quiet all the time, and great backdrop for Halloween parties.
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Old 02-09-2019, 11:15 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seduflow View Post
the one thing about that area is that you dont see any tombstones
You can't see the tombstones because grave markers are flat (level with the ground), and aren't visible from the street. Not all religions require tombstones on graves, at least to my knowledge. Jewish and Catholic cemeteries almost universally have visible tombstones. Also, Jewish law requires tombstones to face east, toward Jerusalem (at least those in the western hemisphere). But I don't always see tombstones in most modern cemeteries (presumably, mainline Protestant or secular). Most of their grave markers are flat or just slightly raised. It lowers the funeral costs to the surviving families, and makes lawn maintenance easier too.
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Old Yesterday, 06:26 AM
Status: "The greatest of these is love." (set 7 hours ago)
 
Location: Here and now.
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I think it depends on the cemetery. There was a beautiful old cemetery in my hometown - full, I believe - with all sorts of interesting old gravestones and statuary. I remember visiting it with my parents and their elderly relatives as a child, and I loved it even then. It seemed to me to be filled with history and romance. I would be quite happy living next to such a cemetery.

A modern one, the kind that looks like a golf course, with flat gravestones only, and which is still actively being used for burials? Not so much. For one thing, I'm not generally fond of that suburban a setting, and for another, I would feel weird every time I thought my own activities might be disturbing a graveside service in progress. As another poster mentioned, how do you have a cookout or patio party yards away from a bereaved family? It would feel disrespectful, and I don't want to have to worry about being disrespectful in my own home.
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Old Yesterday, 06:35 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
What about living next to a pet sematary?

It's ok as long as you don't throw a party loud enough to wake the dead....
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Old Yesterday, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catgirl64 View Post
As another poster mentioned, how do you have a cookout or patio party yards away from a bereaved family? It would feel disrespectful, and I don't want to have to worry about being disrespectful in my own home.

You could always call the caretaker to see if anything happens to be scheduled before you plan a party. Burials don't happen all that often, and you probably don't throw parties all that often, so if you otherwise liked the house I'd bet you could work that issue out.
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Old Yesterday, 08:28 AM
 
Location: northern New England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
You can't see the tombstones because grave markers are flat (level with the ground), and aren't visible from the street. Not all religions require tombstones on graves, at least to my knowledge. Jewish and Catholic cemeteries almost universally have visible tombstones. Also, Jewish law requires tombstones to face east, toward Jerusalem (at least those in the western hemisphere). But I don't always see tombstones in most modern cemeteries (presumably, mainline Protestant or secular). Most of their grave markers are flat or just slightly raised. It lowers the funeral costs to the surviving families, and makes lawn maintenance easier too.

I have been spending more time in cemeteries lately taking photos for FindAGrave. Graves with the flat markers for easy lawn maintenance disappear after several years. If you want to see or read them, bring a digging tool. And even then it's only temporary, after you dig it out, the dirt and grass will fill it in again.
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Old Yesterday, 09:04 AM
 
Location: under the beautiful Carolina blue
16,171 posts, read 24,757,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piney Creek View Post
You could always call the caretaker to see if anything happens to be scheduled before you plan a party. Burials don't happen all that often, and you probably don't throw parties all that often, so if you otherwise liked the house I'd bet you could work that issue out.
And now that I think about it, many cemetaries have moved away from graveside burial services....they look good on tv but they often have them inside now. The actual burial is done when the family is not present.

As far as gravestones vs. flat markers, that seems to be regional. When we lived in NY tombstones were common, here in NC most cemeteries seem to have flat grave markers.
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Old Yesterday, 09:34 AM
 
Location: The Ozone Layer, apparently...
1,761 posts, read 577,659 times
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Old cemeteries are beautiful. I have lived near a few houses that were old enough to have family plots still in the yard. They always made me think, "Here lies <Insert girl's name here> Aged 3 years. Died away from home and mother." Hmmm...why would a 3 year old be away from their home and mother?

A wife's elaborate tall thin slab tombstone, "I have loved thee on Earth, may I meet thee in Heaven."

In doing genealogy research, I found a favorite from one branch of my family - "Gone but not forgotten." After decades of wondering what that was about - I found a poem that it relates to.

Although I wouldn't find it depressing, I've watched to many horror movies, and read too many spooky books to psychologically deal with living next to a cemetery. I wouldn't assume it to be quiet either. I remember parties IN cemeteries, people sneaking off to make out, cause dead folks tell no tales, and people seeking spirit contact through seances etc.
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Old Yesterday, 09:41 AM
 
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In our town, there are 4 small pioneer cemeteries dotted around the city. In the 70s, a developer bought a lot of the land and just built around them. The effect is weird...most are the size of a 1/4 acre lot with old fashioned gates and iron fences. Two are treated as lots surrounded by houses. They're surreal to walk by! Another was completely encircled by homes with a small entrance from the street. It took me 2 years of running through that neighborhood to find it! Hilariously, when one of those homes was up for sale, they touted the "very quiet backyard" (all the backyards back to the cemetery).

The last one is in a more recent, expensive development and is the most bizarre looking. It is tiny and has big old fashioned iron gate. It is a lot on a cul-de-sac with these giant McMansion shoved next door exactly on the lot line. They literally look out windows that directly overlook the thing.

I did read an interesting story about one of the four. During development in the 70s, the stones in one of the cemeteries had mostly been lost by then and the boundaries were a little unclear. The developers set aside the area they thought were the boundaries...only to find evidence that the real boundaries extended MUCH further than they realized...under the houses the were currently building. I guess they just threw up their hands and kept at it. I'm pretty sure most of the homeowners in that area are unaware at this point, but I think about that every time I run down those streets.
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Old Yesterday, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mSooner View Post
I did read an interesting story about one of the four. During development in the 70s, the stones in one of the cemeteries had mostly been lost by then and the boundaries were a little unclear. The developers set aside the area they thought were the boundaries...only to find evidence that the real boundaries extended MUCH further than they realized...under the houses the were currently building. I guess they just threw up their hands and kept at it. I'm pretty sure most of the homeowners in that area are unaware at this point, but I think about that every time I run down those streets.
Something similar happened when building the O'Hare Airport. The City of Chicago bought a huge tract of land with two cemeteries on site. No remains relocated; the airport was simply built around them, with the graves located among the runways, taxiways, and terminals. A narrow access road was built, connecting to a nearby major road. While the cemetery was old enough that no new remains were being buried, visitors still came there on a semi-regular basis. Many families objected, since they now had to mourn their loved ones in the midst of airplane noise. But you know, Chicago politics.

This became problematic after 9/11, because visitors that have nothing to do with air travel were coming onto the airport property, even if for a good reason. The city still allowed the cemeteries to be visited. During a recent O'Hare expansion, one cemetery was decommissioned, to make room for extra runways. Caskets were raised and reburied elsewhere, with full compliance with the deceased's faith; families still objected, though. The other cemetery is still located on O'Hare property. For the most part, you wouldn't know it's there, unless you look at Google Maps or have a reason to visit it.
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