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Old 04-09-2008, 12:09 PM
 
1 posts, read 10,124 times
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Default Section 8

What are some thoughts on buying rentals, and renting section 8.


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Old 04-10-2008, 04:15 PM
 
Location: South Metro Denver and looking at houses
8,465 posts, read 18,301,812 times
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I think it's a good solid plan, especially of you are wanting to buy and hold. Some section 8 renters have been known to stay for decades.

The longest part is getting the property inspected by the housing authorities.
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Old 04-10-2008, 07:29 PM
 
1,176 posts, read 2,861,408 times
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Section 8 is not for everyone.

After a few years I gave it up. The reality became I was spending more money repairing damage and looking for tenants on a moments notice than the premium section 8 generated.

My approach now is the opposite, find solid tenants through up front screening, accept the slight loss on monthly revenue and never again have to unclog a toilet because the tenant was purchasing drugs instead of toilet paper or rip out all of the carpet because they failed to call on a failing sink/toilet because they were afraid I would call the police ... etc .. etc ... etc.
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Old 04-10-2008, 11:25 PM
 
8 posts, read 18,630 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steveindenver View Post
Section 8 is not for everyone.

After a few years I gave it up. The reality became I was spending more money repairing damage and looking for tenants on a moments notice than the premium section 8 generated.

My approach now is the opposite, find solid tenants through up front screening, accept the slight loss on monthly revenue and never again have to unclog a toilet because the tenant was purchasing drugs instead of toilet paper or rip out all of the carpet because they failed to call on a failing sink/toilet because they were afraid I would call the police ... etc .. etc ... etc.
Sounds like a ringing endorsement to me.
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Old 04-17-2008, 06:19 PM
 
9 posts, read 36,652 times
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I own a single family home on a cul-de-sac where three homes were recently converted to Section 8 rentals. It has devastated our block. It was once quiet, peaceful and well-maintained. With the addition of 17 elementary-aged children, and several toddlers, divided among the three homes it's like living next to a daycare. That doesn't even take into account the countless number of appartently unemployed adult renters and visitors who are in and out at all hours of the day and night. Police calls to our block have gone from zero in the 20+ years I've lived here to a more a dozen in the first year. Noise, household debris, junk cars, litter, lawns that never get mowed - you name it - we have it.

The landlords are known slumlords and are well-insulated against complaints. HUD won't assist us, the organization that issues the vouchers won't assist us and our city is just figuring out that this is becoming a growing problem.

Show me a neighborhood that has been improved by bringing the welfare element into it. The homes in question rent for $1400 toand $1800 a month. The government didn't give me a handout when I chose to buy here... I worked hard so I could afford to buy here. Why should people with no pride in where and how they live be allowed to run a neighborhood down? Worst of all - we're literally paying for them to destroy our property values. The Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher Program - which allows people to live in single family homes where there is no property management in place to monitor noise, litter, etc., - doesn't work. Oh, it's great for the renters, but it's a nightmare for hardworking homeowners.

I would caution anyone against buy in a neighborhood with known Section 8 properties and certainly wouldn't encourage investors to ruin nice neighborhoods by accepting Section 8 renters.

And yes, before anyone says we should try "talking" to our new neighbors to help them understand what's expected of them... believe me, we've tried that, and just about everything else. Nothing has worked.
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Old 04-17-2008, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Salem, OR
10,763 posts, read 17,551,649 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhatMe View Post

The landlords are known slumlords and are well-insulated against complaints.
This is the problem, not the Section 8 program. If you are evicted when you have a Section 8 voucher, you lose it. Most tenants are interested in keeping it. You HAVE to screen them AND you have to do regular checks on your property.

When you get good Section 8 tenants, and yes they do exist, it is a good deal for landlords and tenants alike. They are often there very long term. Just screen well.

You also do have to remember that these are not well off people, so maintaining a yard is often difficult since they typically can't afford a lawn mower, etc. So think about that when renting a house. That was the biggest issue I saw with Section 8 folks is lack of yard maintenance.
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Old 04-18-2008, 06:20 AM
 
529 posts, read 1,798,484 times
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This is just based on my own experience I can't say this happens everywhere. As a matter of fact, I'd love to hear about some section 8 success stories.

I grew up with little and as an adult, I like to live below my means and stay out of debt. So I have lived next to section 8 recipients, welfare recipients etc.. And all my experience is that these folks always have more than me. I never saw the neeed to buy cable or the latest HD TV but these folks getting goverment handouts have all the latest technology. They don't just have cable TV but the elite cable that costs over 100 dollars per month. So they can't afford a lawnmower but they can afford beer and cigerettes and the lastest fashions.

This is just what I have observed. I'm not painting a broad brush. I had section 8 tenants who tore up my house. My brother had section 8 tenants who tore up his house. They were supposed to be paying 50 dollars a month in rent and didn't pay that but they had fancy furniture and big screen TVs, etc..

Sorry to offend anyone. But I want the OP to have all the info needed to make an informed decision.


BTW, I have seen non-section 8 tenants just as bad though. I live next door to a homeowner who continuously caused damage to my house. It was so bad, I finally had to move and I sued her for the max in court - 10K - even though I was out 20K. She didn't show up for court. When I got home after court, she was at her house laying tile. I don't have tile, I have cheap linoleum.

P.S. Yes, my brother and I had bad tenants. We are not slumlords but we have property out of state and our agents and section 8 were supposed to be checking the property.

[quote=Silverfall;3496645]This is the problem, not the Section 8 program. If you are evicted when you have a Section 8 voucher, you lose it. Most tenants are interested in keeping it. You HAVE to screen them AND you have to do regular checks on your property.



When you get good Section 8 tenants, and yes they do exist, it is a good deal for landlords and tenants alike. They are often there very long term. Just screen well.

You also do have to remember that these are not well off people, so maintaining a yard is often difficult since they typically can't afford a lawn mower, etc. So think about that when renting a house. That was the biggest issue I saw with Section 8 folks is lack of yard maintenance.[/quote]
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Old 04-18-2008, 06:44 AM
 
2,199 posts, read 4,877,725 times
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Like most of the other posters, I have had nothing but bad experiences with Section 8. I don't know anybody who has ever had a positive experience with Section 8. I own rental property and belong to an investor's group-- none of us would touch Section 8 with a 100-foot pole. It has the potential to be the hugest headache you will ever encounter. Even if you find decent Section 8 tenants, you will have complaints from the neighbors. People don't want Section 8 in their neighborhood and you will hear about it constantly.

I will say that I had the extreme displeasure of living next door to a Section 8 building once. The building was very well-maintained and the landlord was not a slumlord. He kept things up, but he was over there every day, because his tenants trashed everything and he was constantly making repairs and mending fences. Despite his careful screening, there were density issues, noise issues, party issues, kid issues, tresspass issues, vandalism issues, theft issues, cleanliness issues and drug and alcohol issues. The police were called so many times, our block was flagged as a problem block. It hurt resale values. The landlord hated Section 8 and regretted taking that step. I'm not slamming Section 8-- I'm merely reporting my personal experience, which is similar to others I know with firsthand experience with the program.

Section 8 is an abused program, and you will not always get the most conscientious tenants. And they will likely not be welcomed. But maybe you'll be luckier.
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Old 04-18-2008, 07:32 AM
 
529 posts, read 1,798,484 times
Reputation: 149
Very good point. It definately is an abused program. It was meant as a way to get folks out of bad neighborhoods, give them leg up so they can do better. What happens is that lazy, abusive, drug dealing men find women who have free rent and hook up with them. Once again, not trying to paint a broad brush, but his is what I have observed and heard.

Quote:
Originally Posted by goodbyehollywood View Post
Section 8 is an abused program, and you will not always get the most conscientious tenants. And they will likely not be welcomed. But maybe you'll be luckier.
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Old 08-27-2008, 12:37 PM
 
1 posts, read 9,630 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhatMe View Post
I own a single family home on a cul-de-sac where three homes were recently converted to Section 8 rentals. It has devastated our block. It was once quiet, peaceful and well-maintained. With the addition of 17 elementary-aged children, and several toddlers, divided among the three homes it's like living next to a daycare. That doesn't even take into account the countless number of appartently unemployed adult renters and visitors who are in and out at all hours of the day and night. Police calls to our block have gone from zero in the 20+ years I've lived here to a more a dozen in the first year. Noise, household debris, junk cars, litter, lawns that never get mowed - you name it - we have it.

The landlords are known slumlords and are well-insulated against complaints. HUD won't assist us, the organization that issues the vouchers won't assist us and our city is just figuring out that this is becoming a growing problem.

Show me a neighborhood that has been improved by bringing the welfare element into it. The homes in question rent for $1400 toand $1800 a month. The government didn't give me a handout when I chose to buy here... I worked hard so I could afford to buy here. Why should people with no pride in where and how they live be allowed to run a neighborhood down? Worst of all - we're literally paying for them to destroy our property values. The Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher Program - which allows people to live in single family homes where there is no property management in place to monitor noise, litter, etc., - doesn't work. Oh, it's great for the renters, but it's a nightmare for hardworking homeowners.

I would caution anyone against buy in a neighborhood with known Section 8 properties and certainly wouldn't encourage investors to ruin nice neighborhoods by accepting Section 8 renters.

And yes, before anyone says we should try "talking" to our new neighbors to help them understand what's expected of them... believe me, we've tried that, and just about everything else. Nothing has worked.
i wish we were living in a quite, peaceful, & nonviolence world but we don't its up to the landlords to select their tenents not section 8. I'm from Jersey and all the people there weren't the best of candidates but thats up to section 8 once they loose it. Now i live in PA and its the same even if the property managements, realtors and landlords don't want to accept section 8 its not benefiting the states or America everyone decides a chance from all the immigrants coming from ALL OVER THE WORLD did we not give them a chanceYEARS AGO????? it all starts with helping one another not downing each other we are americans what u need to do is suggest that section 8 --housing choice voucher choice program have some of these people trained or take classes on keeping a clean house, maintaining their yard, and letting them know to pick a better choice of friends, because no one wants to loose their housing help unless they want to and they can not blame no one but themselves...... i have the same problem but im moving i have sect. 8 and my neighbors are disrespectful, loud, and ignorant so how do u think i feel//??????? i can't study at night i've been living in my townhouse for several years and i don't think i had to call mang.
(TO REPAIR ANYTHING) at all but one time. My old landlord from jersey did not want me to leave(8 yr.tenent) but i wanted to continue my degree in PA because the drive was just to much. Now i have new neighbors and they have no manners, they harass my children, do all sorts of illegal activities and it is a shame because this was a nice street but please believe me not all SECTION 8 CLIENTS ARE THE SAME SO DON'T PREJUDGE OR JUDGE US ALL THATZ Y CONGRESS IS PASSING LAWS FOR HOUSING DISCRIMINATION, BECAUSE PEOPLE ARE DOING JUST THAT PREJUDGING AND I PRAY THAT EVERYONE GETZ GOOD, CLEAN, RESPECTFUL AND QUITE NEIGHBORS AND SECTION 8 TENENTS! GOD BLESS US ALL

Last edited by sect.8client&clean/w/degr; 08-27-2008 at 12:49 PM.. Reason: added corrections
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