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Old 08-20-2019, 11:29 PM
 
6,822 posts, read 8,169,450 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
Should cities allow micro apartments?
I think that the question would have been better phrased as above.

Local zoning ordinances generally restrict what can be built by private developers. I studied numerous zoning ordinances while in Urban Planning grad school and nearly every community PROHIBITS the construction of smaller dwellings. A lot of it is geared towards keeping lower-income people out of the community, but it also serves to limit the housing choices available to all. Local governments should not be forcing people to build a 2,500+ square foot house if they wish to build an 800 square foot house, or even smaller. The size of most new-built houses has gotten ridiculously large in my area. Having smaller housing options available would be good. I think that high-quality, well-designed smaller houses--even micro ones--would sell well if only local governments would allow them.
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Old Yesterday, 02:44 AM
 
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The minimum was 800 at in my county in Arizona, land was cheap, seemed reasonable. As long as the usual things are considered, I see nothing wrong with it. Plenty of folks living out of small hotel rooms, often with their kids. Land is going to be expensive, where these are needed, and you could very well create a tiny house that cost a million dollars and hurts the aesthetics of the neighborhood. A 2000 SF townhouse lot can be worth 200k in the suburbs, and a lot more on transit lines.
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Old Yesterday, 07:49 AM
 
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Asking because I don't know...what's considered "micro-size"? 300sq ft or less?
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Old Yesterday, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Salem, OR
14,069 posts, read 33,145,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sassybluesy View Post
Asking because I don't know...what's considered "micro-size"? 300sq ft or less?
The first one that went up in Portland, OR a few years ago replaced a run-down single-family home with a 54 unit micro-apartment building. The units are 150-225 sq feet. They filled up quickly as they were under $1000 for a unit. There is ample demand for small micro-units. Portland's minimum is 150 sq feet so, yes, I think city codes should allow for them and then let the market decide if there is demand.
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Old Yesterday, 09:51 AM
 
5,618 posts, read 2,955,491 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackmichigan View Post
I think that the question would have been better phrased as above.

Local zoning ordinances generally restrict what can be built by private developers. I studied numerous zoning ordinances while in Urban Planning grad school and nearly every community PROHIBITS the construction of smaller dwellings. A lot of it is geared towards keeping lower-income people out of the community, but it also serves to limit the housing choices available to all. Local governments should not be forcing people to build a 2,500+ square foot house if they wish to build an 800 square foot house, or even smaller. The size of most new-built houses has gotten ridiculously large in my area. Having smaller housing options available would be good. I think that high-quality, well-designed smaller houses--even micro ones--would sell well if only local governments would allow them.
I agree with all the above.

Specific to microapartments, if there is a young, single worker base large enough to justify building and managing such properties, it seems like a worthy additional CHOICE to offer renters.

The micros I have read about sound too small for me to live in, but I would have considered it when I was young and single in the Boston area.
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Old Yesterday, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,561 posts, read 21,439,299 times
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They're putting up two 7-story Micro apartment buildings in Santa Monica, 184 units each, with 225 SF, excluding bathroom/shower. One of the byproducts of living in a small apartment is it forces you to spend more time outside, which is a good thing, IMO. Puts more pedestrians on the streets.

Given all the anti-development, anti-density, anti this and that Nimby's, in Santa Monica, it's welcome development.

Many that will be living there will discover the golden saying: Less is More!
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Old Yesterday, 10:26 AM
 
5,618 posts, read 2,955,491 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
They're putting up two 7-story Micro apartment buildings in Santa Monica, 184 units each, with 225 SF, excluding bathroom/shower. One of the byproducts of living in a small apartment is it forces you to spend more time outside, which is a good thing, IMO. Puts more pedestrians on the streets.

Given all the anti-development, anti-density, anti this and that Nimby's, in Santa Monica, it's welcome development.

Many that will be living there will discover the golden saying: Less is More!
225 sf not including bathroom is pretty decent for a single working person. The perfect climate of Santa Monica and the nearby public areas on mountains and beaches accommodate anyone’s need to get outside into more space. Great move on their part.

Actually, those might be a nice place to live for some single retirees, too. No worries about availability of medical care, delivery services, gyms, or entertainment.
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Old Yesterday, 10:41 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,772 posts, read 62,818,564 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
Should cities consider micro apartments?
No. If anything they should do the opposite:
support measures that make it easier/cheaper for the singles to share larger properties.
Such as by attaching to some other family unit or creating their own ersatz families.
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Old Yesterday, 11:23 AM
 
3,802 posts, read 967,407 times
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I think the question suggests that there are a substantial amount of people who would consider moving into a large city if the financial part worked out for their budget.

We may not be able to double our income in our industry by moving somewhere else, but we'd love to experience the city, and for that, we'd offer up a sacrifice of space (1/2 or more) for comparable rents.

Those considering such arrangements have conceded (perhaps implicitly) that they understand that a certain price per square foot needs to be met in these cities, and they're willing to sacrifice the space, since they can't give much more in income.

I think ANY amount of this type of housing would be appreciated by many. Even if there has to be a wait list.
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Old Yesterday, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
7,448 posts, read 4,301,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
No. If anything they should do the opposite:
support measures that make it easier/cheaper for the singles to share larger properties.
Such as by attaching to some other family unit or creating their own ersatz families.
Why not both? The less government interference in the housing market, the better. Let builders build what people want to buy. It's not the government's business to decide what is too big or too small or too many or not enough.
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