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Old Yesterday, 11:41 AM
 
Location: annandale, va & slidell, la
7,601 posts, read 3,123,727 times
Reputation: 6420

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Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
Think Tokyo type micro apartments. Should some properties consider a form of micro-apartments? Iím not talking about chopping up existing apartments to become multiple apartments. Iím talking about a new property development (new building or complete remodel of existing property. If planned properly it would be very efficient in living space and still be legal within local metro codes and housing regulations.
If there were a market for it, cities would revise the codes and allow the high-density utility demand.
It would suit the low-income, low self-esteem college grads with social justice degrees.
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Old Yesterday, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Ocala, FL
3,368 posts, read 6,208,880 times
Reputation: 2947
My thought is that most residents won't desire a "Micro apartment". Of course there is a niche of residents who would like to have one, but I believe the majority would prefer more "traditional" housing.
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Old Yesterday, 11:58 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,778 posts, read 62,837,196 times
Reputation: 32726
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
Why not both?
My thinking is that the demand is situational, based on the current social anomaly
of having too many special snowflakes who can't earn enough to do better.
I don't think it serves anyone, especially them, to 'normalize' the phenomenon.

A generation (or two) later... when the population levels and the employment/income economy normalize again
we're left sitting on an oversupply of what amount to dorm rooms.
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Old Yesterday, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
693 posts, read 267,197 times
Reputation: 1673
Quote:
Originally Posted by finalmove View Post
If there were a market for it, cities would revise the codes and allow the high-density utility demand.
It would suit the low-income, low self-esteem college grads with social justice degrees.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
My thinking is that the demand is situational, based on the current social anomaly
of having too many special snowflakes who can't earn enough to do better.
I don't think it serves anyone, especially them, to 'normalize' the phenomenon.

A generation (or two) later... when the population levels and the employment/income economy normalize again
we're left sitting on an oversupply of what amount to dorm rooms.
While what you guys are saying is true for some folks, there are those of us who can afford more space but simply don't want it or need it.
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Old Yesterday, 12:11 PM
 
Location: annandale, va & slidell, la
7,601 posts, read 3,123,727 times
Reputation: 6420
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
My thinking is that the demand is situational, based on the current social anomaly
of having too many special snowflakes who can't earn enough to do better.
I don't think it serves anyone, especially them, to 'normalize' the phenomenon.

A generation (or two) later... when the population levels and the employment/income economy normalize again
we're left sitting on an oversupply of what amount to dorm rooms.
Well said. This is why developers would tip-toe into such a market. Can't imagine why someone wouldn't want enough space for a workshop, or garden, or anything that is a normal human aspiration.
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Old Yesterday, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
693 posts, read 267,197 times
Reputation: 1673
Quote:
Originally Posted by finalmove View Post
Well said. This is why developers would tip-toe into such a market. Can't imagine why someone wouldn't want enough space for a workshop, or garden, or anything that is a normal human aspiration.
LOL because not everyone has the same "human aspirations". Plenty of hobbies out there that don't require the extra home space
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Old Yesterday, 12:27 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,778 posts, read 62,837,196 times
Reputation: 32726
Quote:
Originally Posted by finalmove View Post
Can't imagine why someone wouldn't want enough space...
The extra space someone might have isn't the point.
Normalizing adult relationships to at least be able to tolerate pairing up with others to defray costs is.
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Old Yesterday, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,427 posts, read 6,305,703 times
Reputation: 11775
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
I think the question suggests that there are a substantial amount of people who would consider moving into a large city if the financial part worked out for their budget.

We may not be able to double our income in our industry by moving somewhere else, but we'd love to experience the city, and for that, we'd offer up a sacrifice of space (1/2 or more) for comparable rents.

Those considering such arrangements have conceded (perhaps implicitly) that they understand that a certain price per square foot needs to be met in these cities, and they're willing to sacrifice the space, since they can't give much more in income.

I think ANY amount of this type of housing would be appreciated by many. Even if there has to be a wait list.
I could live with my wife in a 750 sf place again. I could live alone in 450. Less get's difficult, especially if you have hobbies that require even a little bit of equipment (Camping, Fishing, Cycling, Golf...) In a 450 SF apartment three fishing rods get in the way. So does a golf bag. Enough camping gear for a single weekend trip would too. If you hike, or run, or content to read/watch TV, or your hobbies involve going somewhere (like the theater or concerts) then it works a little better.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
My thinking is that the demand is situational, based on the current social anomaly
of having too many special snowflakes who can't earn enough to do better.
I don't think it serves anyone, especially them, to 'normalize' the phenomenon.

A generation (or two) later... when the population levels and the employment/income economy normalize again
we're left sitting on an oversupply of what amount to dorm rooms.
It's a local demand too. Some places are in high demand because people want to live there because its neat (Portland.) Some places are expensive because it is both a land of opportunity and a vibrant place (New York) that attracts all sorts of people.

The worst places have a combination of factors that make them really expensive. San Fancisco/Bay Area has Rent Control, AND a lot of highly paid people, AND it's on a peninsula with most of it being parkland of some sort, AND San Fran doesn't allow much over three stories, AND its an international city.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianGC View Post
While what you guys are saying is true for some folks, there are those of us who can afford more space but simply don't want it or need it.
It's hard or impossible without a goalpost to define micro or minimum. In the last eight years, I've lived in a 1300, 1100, 750, 450, and 650 SF place, respectively. If talking about a 400 square foot place, I agree with you. When talking about a 150 sf place, I agree with MrRational
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Old Yesterday, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
693 posts, read 267,197 times
Reputation: 1673
Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
It's hard or impossible without a goalpost to define micro or minimum. In the last eight years, I've lived in a 1300, 1100, 750, 450, and 650 SF place, respectively. If talking about a 400 square foot place, I agree with you. When talking about a 150 sf place, I agree with MrRational
Fair enough; it's hard to say the exact cut-off. Plus the live-ability also really depends on how the floor plan is laid out.
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Old Yesterday, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Salem, OR
14,071 posts, read 33,145,392 times
Reputation: 12966
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
My thinking is that the demand is situational, based on the current social anomaly
of having too many special snowflakes who can't earn enough to do better.
I don't think it serves anyone, especially them, to 'normalize' the phenomenon.

A generation (or two) later... when the population levels and the employment/income economy normalize again
we're left sitting on an oversupply of what amount to dorm rooms.
I would have totally lived in a micro-unit in college or right after I graduated as a single person. I think there will always be demand for that minimalist type of living for the younger crowd with their first jobs. I don't think there will be enough demand for it to be a dominant housing source. It has nothing to do with being a snowflake, but I would have preferred that living situation to having roommates.
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