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Old 08-21-2019, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Willamette Valley, Oregon
4,185 posts, read 1,184,080 times
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My daughter lives in a micro apartment in Eugene, Oregon. It's 200 Sq ft including a bathroom and a shared kitchen. Rent is about $500/month. She has a little balcony and grows a few plants out there. Eugene is not a cheap place to live, but she doesn't drive and has an online job. City buses go by at least every hour, so can shop as she needs to. Amazon.com is a big plus too.
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Old 08-21-2019, 01:55 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,813 posts, read 62,855,812 times
Reputation: 32766
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverfall View Post
I would have totally lived in a micro-unit in college or right after I graduated as a single person.
I think there will always be demand for that ..
Which is why there have been studio apartments and similar.
Some could manage it financially (maybe even most then) and some just couldn't.

This commentary is about those who couldn't then and how many more of them there are today.
The raw number of them and (as noted) especially so in the currently hip cities.
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Old 08-21-2019, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Salem, OR
14,074 posts, read 33,151,956 times
Reputation: 12966
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
Which is why there have been studio apartments and similar.
Some could manage it financially (maybe even most then) and some just couldn't.

This commentary is about those who couldn't then and how many more of them there are today.
The raw number of them and (as noted) especially so in the currently hip cities.
You are calling them snowflakes. No need for that nonsense.

I think as these newer generations are more earth-friendly that smaller units will be more normal. When I was younger, I was out all of the time. I pretty much just needed a bed and a place for breakfast. I don't see that changing. You make it sound like living on the cheap is a bad thing. Save money, go travel, do whatever. If that is what someone wants to do, go live in a micro-unit and do all of those things.
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Old 08-21-2019, 03:42 PM
 
Location: Ohio
20,206 posts, read 14,393,338 times
Reputation: 16417
Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
Think Tokyo type micro apartments.
Think Culture.

If you think Japanese Culture is even remotely comparable to US Culture, you might want to seriously consider giving your high school diploma back (and your BA if you have one).

If you're relatively new to the US, I'll clue you in on a few things about American Culture.

Americans prize space. In addition to loving space of all kinds, Americans prize personal space.

That's not true in Japan and many other countries that have zero concept of space and zero concept of personal space.

Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
Should some properties consider a form of micro-apartments?
They already do. They're called "efficiencies" and "studios."
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Old 08-21-2019, 04:15 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,813 posts, read 62,855,812 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverfall View Post
You make it sound like living on the cheap is a bad thing.
Nope. I'm saying that not living on the cheap but calling it so... is the bad thing.
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Old 08-21-2019, 05:56 PM
 
10,149 posts, read 8,323,495 times
Reputation: 13914
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackmichigan View Post
I think that the question would have been better phrased as above.

Local zoning ordinances generally restrict what can be built by private developers. I studied numerous zoning ordinances while in Urban Planning grad school and nearly every community PROHIBITS the construction of smaller dwellings. A lot of it is geared towards keeping lower-income people out of the community, but it also serves to limit the housing choices available to all. Local governments should not be forcing people to build a 2,500+ square foot house if they wish to build an 800 square foot house, or even smaller. The size of most new-built houses has gotten ridiculously large in my area. Having smaller housing options available would be good. I think that high-quality, well-designed smaller houses--even micro ones--would sell well if only local governments would allow them.
Exactly! That’s what I meant by consider! Building codes and regulations in some areas prevent such developments.
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Old 08-21-2019, 06:41 PM
 
6,830 posts, read 8,178,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
Exactly! That’s what I meant by consider! Building codes and regulations in some areas prevent such developments.
I understood what you meant, but I think that some people mistook it as the cities themselves being the ones to build the apartments.
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Old 08-21-2019, 07:56 PM
 
145 posts, read 81,736 times
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I'm okay with new buildings having micro apartments as long as those apartments have full kitchens and bathrooms and proper light/air/ventilation. It can be done but it's not easy.
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Old 08-21-2019, 08:51 PM
 
1,085 posts, read 302,959 times
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And people will hate it... but the "micro" apartments will quickly become the only thing that is affordable, so people will rent them anyway. Doesn't mean they want them, just that they have no choice.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverfall View Post
The first one that went up in Portland, OR a few years ago replaced a run-down single-family home with a 54 unit micro-apartment building. The units are 150-225 sq feet. They filled up quickly as they were under $1000 for a unit. There is ample demand for small micro-units. Portland's minimum is 150 sq feet so, yes, I think city codes should allow for them and then let the market decide if there is demand.
$1000 for a closet??? Sounds like there is "ample demand" only because who can afford anything else???


Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
They're putting up two 7-story Micro apartment buildings in Santa Monica, 184 units each, with 225 SF, excluding bathroom/shower. One of the byproducts of living in a small apartment is it forces you to spend more time outside, which is a good thing, IMO. Puts more pedestrians on the streets.

Given all the anti-development, anti-density, anti this and that Nimby's, in Santa Monica, it's welcome development.

Many that will be living there will discover the golden saying: Less is More!
Depends on the location. Where I live, I want nothing to do with "outside" most of the year. I'm sure it's great in Santa Monica, probably not so much in Minnesota or NYC.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
My thinking is that the demand is situational, based on the current social anomaly
of having too many special snowflakes who can't earn enough to do better.
I don't think it serves anyone, especially them, to 'normalize' the phenomenon.

A generation (or two) later... when the population levels and the employment/income economy normalize again
we're left sitting on an oversupply of what amount to dorm rooms.
I think this *is* the "new normal." No matter what the economy does in future, I don't see rents coming down or salaries going up that much.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
The extra space someone might have isn't the point.
Normalizing adult relationships to at least be able to tolerate pairing up with others to defray costs is.
What's wrong with wanting privacy and one's own space???


Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverfall View Post
You are calling them snowflakes. No need for that nonsense.

I think as these newer generations are more earth-friendly that smaller units will be more normal. When I was younger, I was out all of the time. I pretty much just needed a bed and a place for breakfast. I don't see that changing. You make it sound like living on the cheap is a bad thing. Save money, go travel, do whatever. If that is what someone wants to do, go live in a micro-unit and do all of those things.
It's fine if it's what someone wants to do, but the more of these there are, the more people will be expected to be happy with it (because landlords will see they can now charge a premium for "normal" sized spaces), and it's just not for everyone.
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Old 08-21-2019, 10:42 PM
 
5,626 posts, read 2,962,513 times
Reputation: 10626
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverfall View Post
I would have totally lived in a micro-unit in college or right after I graduated as a single person. I think there will always be demand for that minimalist type of living for the younger crowd with their first jobs. I don't think there will be enough demand for it to be a dominant housing source. It has nothing to do with being a snowflake, but I would have preferred that living situation to having roommates.
So would I. Instead, I lived with housemates. It worked out OK, since I knew the people at least slightly beforehand. But if microapartments had been available, I would have preferred having a place of my own, however small. Fact is, most of the time I was at work, then cycling or hiking nearby, and then shower/dinner/bed. A microapartment would have sufficed.
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