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Old 08-22-2019, 01:21 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,577 posts, read 21,449,968 times
Reputation: 24526

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
225 sf not including bathroom is pretty decent for a single working person. The perfect climate of Santa Monica and the nearby public areas on mountains and beaches accommodate anyone’s need to get outside into more space. Great move on their part.

Actually, those might be a nice place to live for some single retirees, too. No worries about availability of medical care, delivery services, gyms, or entertainment.
Micro apartments wouldn't be so desirable in the northern climates, where you're cooped up so much of the year. Understandable why you'd want a bigger house in the north.

I spent 43 years in MN, and I now live in a 920SF mobile home with carport awnings stretch down both sides which creates outdoor patio areas. To make up for being so cooped up in MN for years, I now spend just about every waking hour on my 2 patio's, and spend very little time inside but to sleep. I could even live with 600-700 SF, as I don't utilize much of that space.
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Old 08-22-2019, 02:31 AM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
5,001 posts, read 7,681,442 times
Reputation: 9373
Some of these comments are funny, as if somehow one would be forced to rent a micro apartment for $1000/mo. in a rural, economically challenged area where a three bedroom house goes for $700/mo.

Of course it is a market driven phenomenon potentially experienced in only a few cities here where the housing costs are astronomically high yet the desirability (demand) remains high to live there. The biggest roadblock seems to be parking requirements in the zoning or code, which substantially raise the per unit cost. If those can be waived the the per unit cost generally comes down to a viable number for development.

Behind the times from Seattle and Portland, San Diego only recently revisited its development code to now not require any parking in areas for most residential developments a certain distance from major transit lines and thus a whole slew of micro units 250-350 sf are now being built and/or in planning stages to address the pent up demand for housing here. A developer will likely still offer some parking options but that will be a separately and not inclusive priced commodity for most units.

When it’s that expensive and you still feel compelled to live in an area for whatever reasons one may have have come up with (future opportunities, cultural/geographic amenities etc.) then a micro-apartment just becomes another option to consider to keep you in the area you desire.
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Old 08-22-2019, 04:35 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,815 posts, read 62,875,911 times
Reputation: 32795
Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Damon View Post
When it’s that expensive and you still feel compelled to live in an area ...
a micro-apartment just becomes another option to consider to keep you in the area you desire.
Or their existence allows another excuse to delay making the tougher decisions.
#1 on that list is choosing to live where you can actually afford life - regardless of desires.
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Old 08-22-2019, 04:52 AM
 
Location: Gainesville, FL
292 posts, read 63,439 times
Reputation: 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverfall View Post
I would have totally lived in a micro-unit in college or right after I graduated as a single person. I think there will always be demand for that minimalist type of living for the younger crowd with their first jobs. I don't think there will be enough demand for it to be a dominant housing source. It has nothing to do with being a snowflake, but I would have preferred that living situation to having roommates.
I agree with this. I live in a college town and much of the housing here rents by the bedroom (each has its own bathroom but a shared kitchen and living room). They do roommate matching and we all know that doesn’t always work out for the best. Many roommates end up not speaking bc they have nothing in common or they end up getting mad at each other bc they can’t agree on anything. Some people have personalities that just aren’t conducive to that. There are plenty of options for learning to co-exist with everyone else. Doesn’t have to be a roommate situation.

I can see a demand for this here. We have tons of med students also and they are home to sleep and shower and that’s about it. They are cost-conscious bc of the debt they are taking on. We have quite a lot of studio apartments here (as well as very small one bedrooms) and not all just for students. I think those are probably at least 300sf. But they are also pretty inexpensive. I can see new construction micro apts downtown being pricier. New development here is always expensive for what you get.
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Old 08-22-2019, 05:48 AM
 
4,197 posts, read 1,802,151 times
Reputation: 8550
Micro-units really are not bad. I lived in Japan and the layouts they have for those apartments are much better than we see in the US. I was able to find much smaller furniture scaled for a 250sqft apartment- I could fit a small couch, dining table, desk, and then put my futon away during the day. Many of my friends (and my sister) had a loft design, which was even better. I think the main issue we have here so far is that they don’t yet have furniture scaled for this setup and they insist on putting in gigantic kitchens. If you are in a tiny apartment, you don’t need a huge kitchen to take up half the space.
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Old 08-22-2019, 06:48 AM
 
Location: annandale, va & slidell, la
7,607 posts, read 3,128,568 times
Reputation: 6425
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
The extra space someone might have isn't the point.
Normalizing adult relationships to at least be able to tolerate pairing up with others to defray costs is.
I didnt say extra space, I said enough space.
That can only be determined by the individual. I'm moving, getting old and must adjust to a more compact shop.
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Old 08-22-2019, 07:01 AM
 
5,326 posts, read 5,254,154 times
Reputation: 6303
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
Think Culture.

If you think Japanese Culture is even remotely comparable to US Culture, you might want to seriously consider giving your high school diploma back (and your BA if you have one).

If you're relatively new to the US, I'll clue you in on a few things about American Culture.

Americans prize space. In addition to loving space of all kinds, Americans prize personal space.

That's not true in Japan and many other countries that have zero concept of space and zero concept of personal space.



They already do. They're called "efficiencies" and "studios."

I hate to break it to you but micro apartments are already happening in the US. They will never be everywhere and I don't think they'll ever be mainstream but they are here.
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Old 08-22-2019, 09:00 AM
 
5,630 posts, read 2,966,042 times
Reputation: 10637
Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Damon View Post
Some of these comments are funny, as if somehow one would be forced to rent a micro apartment for $1000/mo. in a rural, economically challenged area where a three bedroom house goes for $700/mo.

Of course it is a market driven phenomenon potentially experienced in only a few cities here where the housing costs are astronomically high yet the desirability (demand) remains high to live there. The biggest roadblock seems to be parking requirements in the zoning or code, which substantially raise the per unit cost. If those can be waived the the per unit cost generally comes down to a viable number for development.

Behind the times from Seattle and Portland, San Diego only recently revisited its development code to now not require any parking in areas for most residential developments a certain distance from major transit lines and thus a whole slew of micro units 250-350 sf are now being built and/or in planning stages to address the pent up demand for housing here. A developer will likely still offer some parking options but that will be a separately and not inclusive priced commodity for most units.

When it’s that expensive and you still feel compelled to live in an area for whatever reasons one may have have come up with (future opportunities, cultural/geographic amenities etc.) then a micro-apartment just becomes another option to consider to keep you in the area you desire.
Micros would be a great option for people who want to live in the heart of a big city, have good jobs in that location, and have no desire to own a car in the first place. They could work a higher-paying job and sock money away for later years. What makes sense and is fun at age 24 is likely to change at, say, age 38. That’s 14 years to save money on rent while also enjoying urban life at a time when they can fully participate in it.
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Old 08-22-2019, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Salem, OR
14,074 posts, read 33,157,919 times
Reputation: 12966
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
Or their existence allows another excuse to delay making the tougher decisions.
#1 on that list is choosing to live where you can actually afford life - regardless of desires.
So I just drove my son to Golden for college last week. I drove from Oregon, through Idaho, Utah, Wyoming and then of course Colorado. When I got back and hit The Dalles and started to see my familiar Oregon trees, I was happy. When I hit Cascade Locks where the lushness really starts, I started to relax. So, my point is that if your goal in life is to live in places that are affordable, but not places you like to live that is a choice. I personally would choose a micro-unit in a city that I want to live in because I actually like the city. I'd live in a micro-unit with no car and stash away money in a place I prefer to live vs living in a bigger unit that is cheaper in a place I don't want to live. Either way, I can save money so why not live where you like.

Here in Salem, the homes that are student rentals are about $500 a room. I'd totally take a micro-unit over that any day. I don't think it is a particularly tough decision. You and I would just make different choices. Both are okay.
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Old 08-22-2019, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Austin
12,397 posts, read 7,063,950 times
Reputation: 13762
I've seen stories about micro apartments in the US. residents basically have a twin bed in a large dorm room with multiple other people who also only have a twin bed. Shared bath, living space, and bedroom with multiple people. No way I'd do that. even in college, we only had two people to a dorm room and shared a bath with two other people.

When I graduated, I rented a crappy apartment in a sketchy part of town with a long commute to my job, but, that one bedroom apartment was mine, alone, a single. for the first time in my life, at 21 years old, I had privacy. it was wonderful.
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