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Old 08-22-2019, 07:16 PM
 
Location: my little town
1,284 posts, read 434,632 times
Reputation: 1297

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I could live in 120 sf, but the number that looks more important to me is units in the building. A large number makes the landlord less personally interested in maintenance of each unit. A rowhouse of 4 floors and 2 units on each floor is a reasonable size.
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Old 08-22-2019, 08:31 PM
 
1,093 posts, read 304,302 times
Reputation: 3055
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
Or their existence allows another excuse to delay making the tougher decisions.
#1 on that list is choosing to live where you can actually afford life - regardless of desires.
If you can't get a job there, you can't afford an apartment at all, can you?
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Old 08-22-2019, 09:09 PM
 
2,541 posts, read 657,086 times
Reputation: 4407
Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
No. Cities should not. Cities should keep their hands off and allow the real estate developers to build what they think will sell, and leave the residents to rent what they need.
The biggest thing is to sweep away existing city regulations, rules, and plans which prevent developers from executing such a plan.
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Old 08-22-2019, 11:32 PM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
9,210 posts, read 3,089,164 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
I agree with all the above.

Specific to microapartments, if there is a young, single worker base large enough to justify building and managing such properties, it seems like a worthy additional CHOICE to offer renters.

The micros I have read about sound too small for me to live in, but I would have considered it when I was young and single in the Boston area.

A micro-apartment with 250 sq. ft. and a large storage locker in a central area, might be a better option for many people.
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Old Yesterday, 11:17 AM
 
5,171 posts, read 2,531,827 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
Think Tokyo type micro apartments. Should some properties consider a form of micro-apartments? Iím not talking about chopping up existing apartments to become multiple apartments. Iím talking about a new property development (new building or complete remodel of existing property. If planned properly it would be very efficient in living space and still be legal within local metro codes and housing regulations.
I think it's a good idea. I see two demographic age groups that would benefit from compact living: youth/students and those starting out in life, and seniors/retirees looking to downsize.

I agree with the point that micro apartments do not necessarily offer a larger space to, for example, produce art, but community and co-op spaces can be found or established for personal hobbies and other activities that need more space. As a benefit, using those community spaces brings the micro-lifestyle people to a community lifestyle. Regarding gardening, the vertical garden is an option that can be added to balconies or interior spaces. I don't see cold climate as a reason to have a large living space. Cold climate dwellers do not hibernate in Winter, and they would probably welcome the lower costs of heating a smaller space.

I found both of these links interesting options for micro-living:

https://interiorzine.com/2017/11/30/...-design-ideas/
https://www.dezeen.com/2019/03/18/mi...cro-apartment/
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Old Yesterday, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,430 posts, read 6,313,317 times
Reputation: 11786
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverfall;55990611[B
]I would have totally lived in a micro-unit in college or right after I graduated as a single person.[/b] I think there will always be demand for that minimalist type of living for the younger crowd with their first jobs. I don't think there will be enough demand for it to be a dominant housing source. It has nothing to do with being a snowflake, but I would have preferred that living situation to having roommates.
I did. It was called a dorm room. No, I didn't have a roommate my sophomore year in the dorms.

I think that the demand for such a micro-apartment (which I have to assume is smaller than a Studio) is much smaller than many let on. Because there is very little that you gain by having a "Micro-apartment." You gain some privacy which you'd have with a lock on your bedroom door anyway, maybe less sharing of a bathroom, and that's it. You lose a functional kitchen, space, etc.

Think about it. You have a unit that's smaller than a studio, which brings you down to a Master Bedroom, basically.

At that point, you assume that there's enough demand from people that absolutely, do not want to share a house or larger apartment. It's easy enough to say it, it's another if you look at it closely. Most people wouldn't have roommates if they had a choice. But, they do have a choice. That choice is between a larger place, with a functional kitchen, more storage, more room even if its shared common area, and a place that's smaller than a studio apartment.

I've lived in a 450 sf place. Given the choice between a studio, and sharing a house, I'd opt for the studio, maybe, depending on the potential situation. Given the choice between what amounts to a motel room wiht a Kitchenette, and a house/apartment share? I'd take roommates, every time.

And another thing. This isn't a new idea. It's a boarding house.
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Old Yesterday, 02:22 PM
 
5,171 posts, read 2,531,827 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
I did. It was called a dorm room. No, I didn't have a roommate my sophomore year in the dorms.

I think that the demand for such a micro-apartment (which I have to assume is smaller than a Studio) is much smaller than many let on. Because there is very little that you gain by having a "Micro-apartment." You gain some privacy which you'd have with a lock on your bedroom door anyway, maybe less sharing of a bathroom, and that's it. You lose a functional kitchen, space, etc.

Think about it. You have a unit that's smaller than a studio, which brings you down to a Master Bedroom, basically.

At that point, you assume that there's enough demand from people that absolutely, do not want to share a house or larger apartment. It's easy enough to say it, it's another if you look at it closely. Most people wouldn't have roommates if they had a choice. But, they do have a choice. That choice is between a larger place, with a functional kitchen, more storage, more room even if its shared common area, and a place that's smaller than a studio apartment.

I've lived in a 450 sf place. Given the choice between a studio, and sharing a house, I'd opt for the studio, maybe, depending on the potential situation. Given the choice between what amounts to a motel room wiht a Kitchenette, and a house/apartment share? I'd take roommates, every time.

And another thing. This isn't a new idea. It's a boarding house.
Micro apartments and dormitory living are not the same. Micro apartment living is compact living in a small space that includes a WC and kitchen, and can have a separate sleeping space.
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Old Yesterday, 02:23 PM
 
64 posts, read 11,188 times
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Yes this would seriously help out the next generation of kids born in the 2000s because inventory is going to keep shrinking and there won’t be enough apartments to rent
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Old Yesterday, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Salem, OR
14,074 posts, read 33,157,919 times
Reputation: 12966
Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
I did. It was called a dorm room. No, I didn't have a roommate my sophomore year in the dorms.

I think that the demand for such a micro-apartment (which I have to assume is smaller than a Studio) is much smaller than many let on. Because there is very little that you gain by having a "Micro-apartment." You gain some privacy which you'd have with a lock on your bedroom door anyway, maybe less sharing of a bathroom, and that's it. You lose a functional kitchen, space, etc.

Think about it. You have a unit that's smaller than a studio, which brings you down to a Master Bedroom, basically.

At that point, you assume that there's enough demand from people that absolutely, do not want to share a house or larger apartment. It's easy enough to say it, it's another if you look at it closely. Most people wouldn't have roommates if they had a choice. But, they do have a choice. That choice is between a larger place, with a functional kitchen, more storage, more room even if its shared common area, and a place that's smaller than a studio apartment.

I've lived in a 450 sf place. Given the choice between a studio, and sharing a house, I'd opt for the studio, maybe, depending on the potential situation. Given the choice between what amounts to a motel room wiht a Kitchenette, and a house/apartment share? I'd take roommates, every time.

And another thing. This isn't a new idea. It's a boarding house.
Yes, the micro-units are smaller than a studio. Anything under 400 sq. feet is considered a micro-unit. They are generally about 250-300 sq feet. 150 is pretty small, but they can go that small. Those ones generally have a shared bathroom down the hall since you can't really get a kitchen/bath in that small of a space. The others can have their own bathrooms in the unit itself.

It's all about choice in the rental market. There is demand for the units in large metros. Would people prefer more space? Yes, but I think there is enough demand that prefers the cheaper rents and will take the smaller space as a result. You won't see micro-units in small cities anytime soon.
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Old Yesterday, 02:38 PM
 
5,171 posts, read 2,531,827 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverfall View Post
Yes, the micro-units are smaller than a studio. Anything under 400 sq. feet is considered a micro-unit. They are generally about 250-300 sq feet. 150 is pretty small, but they can go that small. Those ones generally have a shared bathroom down the hall since you can't really get a kitchen/bath in that small of a space. The others can have their own bathrooms in the unit itself.

It's all about choice in the rental market. There is demand for the units in large metros. Would people prefer more space? Yes, but I think there is enough demand that prefers the cheaper rents and will take the smaller space as a result. You won't see micro-units in small cities anytime soon.
Micro apartments are such a new idea that it is easy to assume that it is no different than dorm living, but the 200-400 square foot spaces are a self contained living space and usually include modular and moveable furniture that permits transforming and adapting one space for multiple purposes.
"Micro apartments usually include space for sleeping, sitting, a kitchenette, a limited number of shelves or cubbyholes and a bathroom. Many "tiny living" apartments are designed with space-saving furniture such as beds built into walls, futons that convert into other furniture, built-in storage space, folding desks and tables, and extremely small or hidden appliances."
https://whatis.techtarget.com/defini...icro-apartment
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