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Old 08-22-2019, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,550 posts, read 2,842,583 times
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Washington state has a law that says that you can't live in a "camping" situation for more than 6 months at a time. Here I see ads all the time for lots with permanent trailers on them for sale that stipulate you can only live on the lot for 6 months. If they find you and give you a date to move, they'll fine you if you're not gone by that date.

I did see one ad that claimed to be grandfathered in so the people could live there full time. I think a lot of the reason for the law is because Washington is so wooded that people would go out in the woods and parks and never leave again. Even on my own lot I'm not supposed to be "camping" on it more than 6 months, and that's property I bought and am paying taxes on. The only way I can live there legally is to have a permanent to-code structure on the lot with electric, water, and a septic system.

Whatever it takes to make you give money to the state, they'll do it and/or make a law about it.
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Old 08-22-2019, 11:18 PM
 
Location: on the wind
7,661 posts, read 3,206,874 times
Reputation: 25970
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana Holbrook View Post
I've seen this on properties that are zoned and permitted as recreational properties.... not residences.
I'd look at the zoning and then at the covenants. Of course, when you buy the property you agree to abide by the covenants but AFAIK HOA covenants can't dismiss or override zoning.

Last edited by Parnassia; 08-22-2019 at 11:41 PM..
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Old 08-23-2019, 10:36 AM
 
10,541 posts, read 12,491,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
Okay, but... Again, I don't see how one can stipulate -- even in a contract -- that someone not occupy his own property.
It's true that the land on which these buildings sit is leased.........."IT IS NOT THEIR PROPERTY!"
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Old 08-23-2019, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
6,126 posts, read 3,405,975 times
Reputation: 16611
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
Washington state has a law that says that you can't live in a "camping" situation for more than 6 months at a time. Here I see ads all the time for lots with permanent trailers on them for sale that stipulate you can only live on the lot for 6 months. If they find you and give you a date to move, they'll fine you if you're not gone by that date.

I did see one ad that claimed to be grandfathered in so the people could live there full time. I think a lot of the reason for the law is because Washington is so wooded that people would go out in the woods and parks and never leave again. Even on my own lot I'm not supposed to be "camping" on it more than 6 months, and that's property I bought and am paying taxes on. The only way I can live there legally is to have a permanent to-code structure on the lot with electric, water, and a septic system.

Whatever it takes to make you give money to the state, they'll do it and/or make a law about it.

I think there may be code against permanently living in one place in a trailer or RV with wheels, most anywhere, not just where there is specific zoning restrictions. I've had clients run into it on their own land. I do wonder if that may change in time with the popularity of tiny homes.
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Old 08-23-2019, 10:59 AM
 
7,962 posts, read 4,507,933 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana Holbrook View Post
I think there may be code against permanently living in one place in a trailer or RV with wheels, most anywhere, not just where there is specific zoning restrictions. I've had clients run into it on their own land. I do wonder if that may change in time with the popularity of tiny homes.
Yes, within city limits except in a designated RV park, if on wheels. People on private land out in the country generally get away with anything. But, to be clear, these are permanent structures; not RVs.
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Old 08-23-2019, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
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Even out in unincorporated areas, the county can get after people for unpermitted and noncompliant situations, if they become aware of it.
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Old 08-23-2019, 11:38 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,891 posts, read 62,992,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
People on (their own) private land out in the country generally get away with anything.
On their own land and when their deed has no restrictions.
But that isn't the case with a private lake weekender and vacation development. Is it?
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Old 08-23-2019, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Raleigh NC
9,804 posts, read 7,420,765 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
On their own land and when their deed has no restrictions.
But that isn't the case with a private lake weekender and vacation development. Is it?
said the OP originally ...

Quote:
It's true that the land on which these buildings sit is leased
imagine leasing some farm land to a tenant farmer. your lease may very well say "one crop per year".
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Old 08-23-2019, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,453 posts, read 6,336,763 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
Having owned only SFHs, I was aware of HOAs and their various rules, but nothing limiting the amount of time one could spend in one's own purchased property (other than a timeshare), but apparently this is a "thing." Thanks for educating me!
I've never heard of that either.

I do understand deed restrictions, that say what you can or can't do on a property.

I understand that Deed Restrictions are different than HOA rules...Literally the difference between "the law" and "the rules."

However, I've never heard of one like what you mention. Typically, one things of them that prevent you from building a five story building in a SFH neighborhood, or from owning cattle on your 1/2 acre lot in town, or putting a doublewide in some neighborhoods. I've heard of other more restrictive covenants, such as prohibitions on a mansard roof, etc.

I've heard about the opposite of what you describe; deed restrictions that prohibit short term rentals such as VRBO's. I've never heard of one that says you can't occcupy the place full time.

I believe it, I'd just never heard of such a thing outside of (maybe) a time-share type of thing.
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Old 08-23-2019, 02:48 PM
 
7,962 posts, read 4,507,933 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
I've never heard of that either.

I do understand deed restrictions, that say what you can or can't do on a property.

I understand that Deed Restrictions are different than HOA rules...Literally the difference between "the law" and "the rules."

However, I've never heard of one like what you mention. Typically, one things of them that prevent you from building a five story building in a SFH neighborhood, or from owning cattle on your 1/2 acre lot in town, or putting a doublewide in some neighborhoods. I've heard of other more restrictive covenants, such as prohibitions on a mansard roof, etc.

I've heard about the opposite of what you describe; deed restrictions that prohibit short term rentals such as VRBO's. I've never heard of one that says you can't occcupy the place full time.

I believe it, I'd just never heard of such a thing outside of (maybe) a time-share type of thing.
I'm glad it's not just me. I'm still not sure how that's legal, but apparently it is. What if you just want to go check on your place to make sure vandals or bears haven't broken in or the water pipes aren't leaking? What if you have an emergency at your main house and need a place to spend the night (or a week, while repairs are made); do you have to pay for a hotel room because you aren't allowed in your second property? What if they decide to sell the land; what happens to your vacation home, permanently placed on it?

So many questions...
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