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Old 09-02-2019, 07:36 PM
 
Location: california
5,769 posts, read 4,960,499 times
Reputation: 6797

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I personally prefer an old bat and board tin roofed home built in the 1930s .
knob and tube wiring and old switches and old plumbing.
problem is in other parts of the country/town it's not so popular .

We live in a time when other dictate what you own and how you live . they can even invade your neighborhood and begin changing things to suit them self because they have MONEY that says so.
And this action raises your taxes, isn't that wonderful ? but you don't complain because it also raised your property value so you can sell and find some where else to life.
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Old Yesterday, 06:08 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
1,006 posts, read 900,742 times
Reputation: 1513
Quote:
Originally Posted by Osmium View Post
It's become a trend in my neighborhood, where just about all of the houses were built in the 1940's/1950's and are small ranches around 800-1200 sq feet in size for old houses to be torn down and are replaced with these hideous, generic, over-sized two-floor new houses that are completely out of proportion for the streets they are on. Not only are they ugly, they tower over the old houses and block all the sunlight and view.

In my opinion these new giant houses just seem cheap and tasteless. Just about every single new house I've seen built are one of these as well. Does no one want a modest, reasonably sized house anymore? Maybe it's because I've lived in a 800 sq foot house all my life but I simply don't understand what one is doing with all of that space. It seems ridiculous to me to be living in a 2500-3000 sq ft house if you're just a four-member family or less like the majority are around here.

This is obviously subjective, state your opinions about the new houses that have appeared in your neighborhoods and what you think about them.
Thanks to governmental fees and regulations it is not cost effective to build those 800 to 1200 ft stand alone homes anymore. This is why either you have the 2000+ ft house being built in large sections.
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Old Yesterday, 07:30 AM
 
1,683 posts, read 846,742 times
Reputation: 2797
Quote:
Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post
Too funny.
"Old".
Old is 1835. Not 1950.
1950 is old.
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Old Yesterday, 07:32 AM
 
1,683 posts, read 846,742 times
Reputation: 2797
Quote:
Originally Posted by arleigh View Post
I personally prefer an old bat and board tin roofed home built in the 1930s .
knob and tube wiring and old switches and old plumbing.
problem is in other parts of the country/town it's not so popular .

We live in a time when other dictate what you own and how you live . they can even invade your neighborhood and begin changing things to suit them self because they have MONEY that says so.
And this action raises your taxes, isn't that wonderful ? but you don't complain because it also raised your property value so you can sell and find some where else to life.
You can always go buy your own plot of land out in the country and build to suit.
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Old Yesterday, 09:23 AM
 
1,576 posts, read 1,386,707 times
Reputation: 1302
Default Call me paranoid but ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spokaneinvestor View Post
Totally off-topic comment, but YES, always do a video inspection of the sewer line on a older home prior to purchase. In some locals where I have income properties, the City requires a every 5 year (or when sold) video inspection of sewer laterals to keep sewer discharge from being allowed to leak into the ground water. Folks that have a broken sewer connection have to fix within a certain time period or their water is shut off.



.... I bought/sold a few homes in my life and rented others and have seen a pattern. The utility company will show up just weeks after you buy and tell you that you must replace a faulty gas line line, water line, sewerage line that just happens to be the land owner's responsibility to fix. Or like the mob moving in on the new owner, the utility company will want to "enroll" you into a few dollars each month plan to replace a utility service that in the future the utility company must replace because of its age. At its discretion.
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Old Yesterday, 09:35 AM
 
1,576 posts, read 1,386,707 times
Reputation: 1302
Default Sq. Foot Scam

Quote:
Originally Posted by foodyum View Post
I believe most people would think 800 square feet for a family of 4 is too small. That is considered a tiny house. Most want 3 bedrooms for different gender children. So the 3 bedrooms alone take up half the sq footage. Add a bathroom, some closets and you barely have room for a small combo kitchen/dining/living room. i google house plans and couldn’t find many with the 3rd bedroom. Surprised many on this thread think families want this, especially families who home school and need classroom space.

Every calculation I have ever seen includes the basement (finished or not) into the total square foot calculation. Doesn't matter if the basement is walk out or not. I even inspected one that was radon mitigated. New homes are 100% homes meaning their footprint occupies as much of the lot as possible. In sunshine states, there are no attics just 2 1\2 story high foyers with the second floor ceilings being the underside of the roof.
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Old Yesterday, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
14,821 posts, read 8,675,163 times
Reputation: 29682
100% agree. I live in the Houston area and all new construction homes are the same hideously ugly clunky beige turds with microscopic yards and no space between each of them. They're so close together you can hear your neighbors fart. The only difference between each home is two story vs. one story. I told my wife the next home we buy will be an older home. I refuse to live in a bland cookie cutter home that looks like everyone else's.
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Old Yesterday, 10:59 AM
 
Location: equator
3,758 posts, read 1,654,854 times
Reputation: 9385
Then again, build something slightly---ever so slightly---unique and SHTF. My ex and I built this custom home with our own 4 hands. I have the arthritis to prove it. Because it was tailored to the sloping lot and dynamite views, it was not a standard Colorado "box". But over and over we heard "It's a one-level ranch with a basement". Not hardly. It was on the market for ages and sold for less than the neighbors.

And look at it now:

7975 Hillview Street, Parker CO 80134, USA - Virtual Tour

SIGH.
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Old Yesterday, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
24,234 posts, read 18,058,560 times
Reputation: 28506
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Its is funny that the new developments are 4,000 sf but still being built as traditional styles, such as this one near us.








But, when they demolish a Seattle Victorian, they replace it with a big ugly box that just doesn't go at all with the neighborhood, and in many cases the developer buys and demolishes two or 3 homes and replaces them like this:

This is the trend in Nashville. I hate the industrial look for things that are not supposed to be industrial.
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Old Yesterday, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Brew City
4,472 posts, read 2,636,407 times
Reputation: 6099
Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaTownsley View Post
I really love the Milwaukee bungalows built around the turn of the century. Although most only have one bathroom which doesn’t cut it for a large family like ours.

We have always been fine in 1100-1400ish sf. We have four kids with another on the way. More square footage means more messes and more to clean. Lol No thanks! Most large families I know also have modest homes, and many of us homeschool so we are in that house more than the average family.

I guess everything is relative. My parents downsized (still a 3/2/2, though) but it was really an upgrade and they call it “the tiny house.” Makes me just roll my eyes bc it’s much nicer than most people will ever have and it comes off as pretentious.
I love the houses in this area. We're in Shorewood-Milwaukee and our family of four is quite happy in a 1250 sq ft, 100 year old bungalow.
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