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Old 09-04-2019, 10:50 AM
 
2,671 posts, read 706,595 times
Reputation: 4709

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Here's my neighbor's new house. It isn't everyone's cup of tea, of course, but it is truly beautiful if you like modern architecture and is stunning in its use of home automation technology.

https://www.eaglesentry.com/spaces-home

He did go a bit overboard -- for example, he has a car lift in one of the garages that lifts his Rolls Royce or Lamborghini directly into the master bedroom (actually, separated by floor-to-ceiling glass for safety reasons), which in turn has two king size beds smushed together. Another over-the-top example: every drawer in the kitchen & butler's pantry & dining room is motorized, and opens with a touch of a button on his cell phone.

It's a great house to host a charity fund-raiser or large party.

****************

Here's a new house for sale near me in my vacation house neighborhood. Again, brand new construction, modern contemporary design. It also is stunning.:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3...zpid/?mmlb=g,1



Not far is another new mountain contemporary: https://cityhomecollective.com/listi...canyon-gate-rd

************

Despite the OP's distaste for contemporary & modern construction, it is clear beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Last edited by RationalExpectations; 09-04-2019 at 11:00 AM..
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Old 09-04-2019, 11:29 AM
 
2,671 posts, read 706,595 times
Reputation: 4709
Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Damon View Post
If you desire a newer custom or semi-custom house with superior design and construction you are going to have to pay for it.
Absolutely.

There's an old saying about quality: If you want quality oats, expect to pay a premium price for them. If, however, you're willing to settle for oats that have already been processed by a horse, well, that's less expensive.
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Old 09-04-2019, 11:33 AM
 
2,671 posts, read 706,595 times
Reputation: 4709
Quote:
Originally Posted by Remington Steel View Post
1950 is old.
2010 is old.
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Old 09-04-2019, 11:42 AM
 
2,671 posts, read 706,595 times
Reputation: 4709
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mistermobile View Post
Every calculation I have ever seen includes the basement (finished or not) into the total square foot calculation. Doesn't matter if the basement is walk out or not.
Fascinating. The custom in Park City UT (Summit County) is not to include the basement in house SF calculations for property tax purposes, which surprised me. I was surprised to find this out - but it is true. My vacation house there is fairly new -- it's certificate of occupancy is dated 2008 and was a custom build. It is in the 7500 sf range, which does not include the basement area, which is substantial. The basement houses the mechanical room for boilers for the driveway snow melt system and the hydronic heating system for the interior of the house during the cold winters & radon mitigation system, the home theater with stadium seating, the fitness room, a bedroom with bunk beds for 8 kids, nor full bathroom. Neither does the SF include the 1250 sf garage/shop.
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Old 09-04-2019, 11:53 AM
 
2,671 posts, read 706,595 times
Reputation: 4709
Quote:
Originally Posted by steiconi View Post
A woman I know was boasting about downsizing to a 4000 sf house. There are just two of them, what do they need all that space for?
Entertaining.

We regularly host charity fundraisers and have 50 to 100 guests.
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Old 09-04-2019, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Prepperland
13,891 posts, read 9,975,534 times
Reputation: 10058
Quote:
Originally Posted by texan2yankee View Post
... as it complies with codes and laws.
When did "free" Americans have to get permission from their servant in order to build a house?
Don't think too long on that one.
Moving on.
Having read about house building and architecture from the mid 1970s, I found that building codes are not there to protect the people but to preserve the status quo (industry, banking, government).
In my own experience, I sought financing to build a superinsulated surface bonded concrete block house in upstate NY. Despite my financial good health, and job as an engineer at a small industrial giant, I was routinely turned down because it would be a "white elephant" according to the loan officers.
Only commercial buildings used concrete block and no one ever heard of surface bonded block - despite the USDA pamphlet I showed high lighting how great it was.
Now, if I chose to build a wood framed termite trap, prone to mold mildew, flammable, floodable, easily blown down in wind house, they would be more than happy to fund it.
https://ncma.org/resource/surface-bo...-construction/

The next time I butted heads with the status quo involved a company (now defunct) that made factory built modular homes - not to be confused with mobile homes / double wides. The company was more than happy to tweak my amateur floorplans to their system, and provided me with a quote of $39k, delivered on site. I then tried to find one plot of land that would appease the financial institutions, zoning, and etc, etc. Nada. I finally had to settle for a local builder's woefully under designed model in order to get the land -and- house financed.


SUMMED UP - AMERICAN HOUSING IS A RACKET.
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Old 09-04-2019, 12:20 PM
 
2,554 posts, read 1,300,684 times
Reputation: 5491
Quote:
Originally Posted by RationalExpectations View Post
Here's my neighbor's new house. It isn't everyone's cup of tea, of course, but it is truly beautiful if you like modern architecture and is stunning in its use of home automation technology.

https://www.eaglesentry.com/spaces-home

He did go a bit overboard -- for example, he has a car lift in one of the garages that lifts his Rolls Royce or Lamborghini directly into the master bedroom (actually, separated by floor-to-ceiling glass for safety reasons), which in turn has two king size beds smushed together. Another over-the-top example: every drawer in the kitchen & butler's pantry & dining room is motorized, and opens with a touch of a button on his cell phone.

It's a great house to host a charity fund-raiser or large party.

****************

Here's a new house for sale near me in my vacation house neighborhood. Again, brand new construction, modern contemporary design. It also is stunning.:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3...zpid/?mmlb=g,1



Not far is another new mountain contemporary: https://cityhomecollective.com/listi...canyon-gate-rd

************

Despite the OP's distaste for contemporary & modern construction, it is clear beauty is in the eye of the beholder.
Indeed it is. And to this beholder those are some of the worst looking houses I have ever seen. Cringe.
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Old 09-04-2019, 12:28 PM
 
Location: East Lansing, MI
9,457 posts, read 8,123,497 times
Reputation: 3987
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
On new construction homes on the verge of exurbia, there are planned communities, having all the space in the world at their disposal, who choose to have "alleys" out back. Effectively naming only every other street in the grid.

Example: Briar Chapel in Chapel Hill, NC: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Br...!4d-79.1013533


We lived in a similar development in Charlotte, NC. A John Weiland neighborhood called McCullough. Our house was a detached garage on an alley plan, which was the most expensive "tier" of homes offered in the neighborhood.


There were also attached garage plans with the garage facing the street and no alley - which makes perfect sense for home sites on the perimeter of the development. There were also townhomes. So, a little something for everyone (nearly).
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Old 09-04-2019, 12:37 PM
 
Location: East Lansing, MI
9,457 posts, read 8,123,497 times
Reputation: 3987
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcfas View Post
Seems like some of the newer designs are returning to mid-century modern styles. The thing is they appear to have far less individuality than their inspiration. Iíve seen some in the newer 55+ developments.


Mid mod is definitely making a comeback. Just look at the furniture offerings out there now, for proof.


We bought a 1957 butterfly roofed house this spring and we love it. Unfortunately most of the mid century details were "renovated out" of the interior, but the roof line, carport (facing the street! <gasp>) and covered side porch are all still there.


This is how it looked when we bought it in April. The house painters should be finishing up today or tomorrow, so I'll get a new pic posted this weekend. There have been noticeable changes.


EDITED -- thanks Emm.

Last edited by hooligan; 09-04-2019 at 12:46 PM..
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Old 09-04-2019, 01:21 PM
 
7,250 posts, read 4,009,564 times
Reputation: 15358
Quote:
Originally Posted by RationalExpectations View Post
Here's my neighbor's new house. It isn't everyone's cup of tea, of course, but it is truly beautiful if you like modern architecture and is stunning in its use of home automation technology.

https://www.eaglesentry.com/spaces-home

He did go a bit overboard -- for example, he has a car lift in one of the garages that lifts his Rolls Royce or Lamborghini directly into the master bedroom (actually, separated by floor-to-ceiling glass for safety reasons), which in turn has two king size beds smushed together. Another over-the-top example: every drawer in the kitchen & butler's pantry & dining room is motorized, and opens with a touch of a button on his cell phone.

It's a great house to host a charity fund-raiser or large party.

****************

Here's a new house for sale near me in my vacation house neighborhood. Again, brand new construction, modern contemporary design. It also is stunning.:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3...zpid/?mmlb=g,1



Not far is another new mountain contemporary: https://cityhomecollective.com/listi...canyon-gate-rd

************

Despite the OP's distaste for contemporary & modern construction, it is clear beauty is in the eye of the beholder.
Certainly not everyone's cup of tea; the first one can be held as a prime example of this thread's title. Appearance is more industrial or municipal than residentialand the combination of multiple different surface treatments on the exterior alone is horrible; continuing the multi-gray and varied texture masonry to the interiors only compounds the offense.
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