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Old 09-07-2019, 11:24 AM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
5,032 posts, read 7,719,663 times
Reputation: 9455

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vegabern View Post
Very nice house. I'd take that over anything RationalExpectations is posting.
Agreed!
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Old 09-07-2019, 04:37 PM
 
Location: california
5,778 posts, read 4,972,503 times
Reputation: 6827
Have you seen modern treehouses?
They are extraordinary.
Problem is, you can't just build them anywhere, there are ordinances counties have to regulate what is built. People with no education complain and make issues and creativity is destroyed.
The problem I have seen is that even if you are the first to build in an area, others fallowing can undermine you.
An airport is established and the greed of the city allows homes to be established in the area and soon the airport is in jeopardy.
If you are going to park you but in the flight's landing path, you put your self in harm's way no one made you do it.
If you bought next to a railroad track, it should be assumed that there will be times the train might just pass through during the night rearranging your dishes.
If you don't think about these things, you are the numbskull.
I can appreciate that people choose to live in a certain type of neighborhood and that is what they are buying into. but going in with the idea of changing things because it clashes with your taste is not acceptable. i.e. If you knew that there was a dumpy house on the block and you still choose to buy there , mind our own business.
If you want to better the neighborhood and offer to help fix up their place too, realize that the upgrade may just put their property values taxes high enough to put them out of a home altogether.
Some wealthy mean well, but are stupid and self-centered. I have known such people personally.
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Old 09-07-2019, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
1,018 posts, read 904,594 times
Reputation: 1539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mistermobile View Post
Why don't builders disguise the garage door to look like part of the home with fake windows, trim, even a fake door, or maybe fake brick? Lack of imagination here. The side of the garage facing the street could have a "house" window, curtains, a lamp and all. Why not?
You make a good point. Iím not sure why you donít see what you describe on houses.
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Old 09-10-2019, 06:57 AM
 
2 posts, read 1,539 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Its is funny that the new developments are 4,000 sf but still being built as traditional styles, such as this one near us.








But, when they demolish a Seattle Victorian, they replace it with a big ugly box that just doesn't go at all with the neighborhood, and in many cases the developer buys and demolishes two or 3 homes and replaces them like this:

Ouch ! That hurts.
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Old 09-10-2019, 01:01 PM
Status: "The beach Life" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
15,911 posts, read 27,067,707 times
Reputation: 20711
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted Bear View Post
...and when did it become "fashionable" to face the garage toward the street?


Or is it just less costly to build in that manner?
In our area garages have faced the street since the 50's, unless your driveway is like mine. I have an L shaped driveway, where the garage door, instead of facing the street it faces my neighbors house.

Where else would you put the garage?
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Old 09-10-2019, 01:06 PM
Status: "The beach Life" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
15,911 posts, read 27,067,707 times
Reputation: 20711
Quote:
Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post
Because garages belong in the back on the alley.
When is the last time they built an alley behind a house? Isn't that a poor use of space? So you have a road in front and an alley in the back. Our home was built in 1963 and no alley back then.
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Old 09-10-2019, 01:09 PM
Status: "The beach Life" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
15,911 posts, read 27,067,707 times
Reputation: 20711
For the past 40 years I have watched homes at the beach go from 1 story small bungelows, to 3,000 or larger 2 stories, to 5,500 or larger 3 story homes. And the garages are all in front where they belong.

In town the more garages the better. Homes went from 1 car to 2 car, and now 3 car garages. I have seen homes built with 5 car garages. My favorite is a 2 car garage with a 1 car garage off to the side. One of the garages faces the street the other faces the neighbors home. Both use the same driveway.

Garages are not only a focal point. Many are finished, with completed walls, ceilings, nice flooring. The ideal garage has your favorite car, an outdoor entertainment area, seating for your friends, big screen on the wall, automotive art hanging on the walls. It becomes an extension of your home. A man cave sort of place. I have seen garages that are nicer than many living rooms.
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Old 09-10-2019, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,537 posts, read 12,162,110 times
Reputation: 32851
Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
When is the last time they built an alley behind a house? Isn't that a poor use of space? So you have a road in front and an alley in the back. Our home was built in 1963 and no alley back then.
Alley loading garages are the norm in my neighborhood, which is a planned urban community on the site of the former airport here in Denver. Construction is ongoing, including some on next block over from me. So when is the last time they built an alley? I guess I could say today!

And we do not consider it a poor use of space, because it maximizes the walkability and community feel of the neighborhood to have the houses close together and you can walk down a block and stay on the sidewalk the entire way, without it being interrupted by driveways. Much safer for the many kids who live here who routinely play outdoors
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Old 09-10-2019, 03:29 PM
 
1,357 posts, read 2,095,582 times
Reputation: 948
Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE View Post
In our area garages have faced the street since the 50's, unless your driveway is like mine. I have an L shaped driveway, where the garage door, instead of facing the street it faces my neighbors house.

Where else would you put the garage?
In my neck of the woods most garages face the street, however, side facing garages are considered "higher end" and are even mandated in some nicer neighborhoods.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SOON2BNSURPRISE
When is the last time they built an alley behind a house? Isn't that a poor use of space? So you have a road in front and an alley in the back. Our home was built in 1963 and no alley back then.
Alley's are fairly common in the 'burbs in the Dallas metroplex, including recent and fairly high end subdivisions. Creates a more uniform look from the street.
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Old 09-11-2019, 08:54 AM
Status: "The beach Life" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
15,911 posts, read 27,067,707 times
Reputation: 20711
In our area the alleyways were first out in when people did not always have cars. Some of the homes built in 1900 to 1920 still had areas for horses and a buggy. I know of some homes that still have the carriage house in the back alleyway. Many of the older homes the owners over the years built larger garages. One childhood friend owned one of these historical homes and his former carriage house had been turned into an apartment. He also had a 2 car garage.

By the 1940's we still had alleyways in the back although some of the homes were built with the garages in the front of the home. Preferences were changing. Many of the homes that had the garages in the back alley area were separate buildings. The garages were not attached to the home. In each case where a garage was built facing the alley the driveway was non existent or too short to park a car on. In our city you are not allowed to park in the alley.

As the 50's rolled around people were buying more than one car. They wanted additional space to park a car. One car garages stopped being built. Homes all had 2 car garages. The garages were now connected to the house and for the most part in the front of the house. They included a driveway that you could park at least 2 cars on.

By the mid 70's the 3 car garage was becoming more prevalent. with either a large door for two cars and a smaller door for 1 car, or a three car garage with 3 separate doors all in a row. Some homeowners turned this this extra garage into living space. By the late 90's many developers were offering the option of the third car space as a bonus room.

By the early 2000's we started to see three car with a tandem parking layout with one car parked in front of one of the other cars. This could be also turned into a bonus room depending on the builder.

We do have one development of condos and patio homes, built in the past 8 years, that does have alleyways. The streets are so narrow that with a car parked on either side of the road you would need to wait for a car to drive past if you were also driving. Im used to large roads and the development is not my idea of a place I would want to live. I discount this since these are not single family homes. The homes are all connected.
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