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Old Today, 11:13 AM
 
Location: annandale, va & slidell, la
7,653 posts, read 3,140,615 times
Reputation: 6483

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Osmium View Post
It's become a trend in my neighborhood, where just about all of the houses were built in the 1940's/1950's and are small ranches around 800-1200 sq feet in size for old houses to be torn down and are replaced with these hideous, generic, over-sized two-floor new houses that are completely out of proportion for the streets they are on. Not only are they ugly, they tower over the old houses and block all the sunlight and view.

In my opinion these new giant houses just seem cheap and tasteless. Just about every single new house I've seen built are one of these as well. Does no one want a modest, reasonably sized house anymore? Maybe it's because I've lived in a 800 sq foot house all my life but I simply don't understand what one is doing with all of that space. It seems ridiculous to me to be living in a 2500-3000 sq ft house if you're just a four-member family or less like the majority are around here.

This is obviously subjective, state your opinions about the new houses that have appeared in your neighborhoods and what you think about them.
We dont know whether houses near you are ugly or not.
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Old Today, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
10,856 posts, read 10,338,559 times
Reputation: 14427
While I'm not a fan of new construction, I don't care for small ranchers either.

Land is expensive, so builders build upwards.

People want space. I for one wouldn't feel comfortable having my entire family in 1200 sq ft. Been there, done that. Our home is 3700 sq ft, built thirty years ago. We use 90% of the space on a regular basis.

New builds may be cookie cutter but I don't find a-framed ranchers particularly attractive either. Bungalows, however, are.
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Old Today, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
10,856 posts, read 10,338,559 times
Reputation: 14427
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted Bear View Post
...and when did it become "fashionable" to face the garage toward the street?


Or is it just less costly to build in that manner?
We have a swing in side entry garage, and a front-facing one is easier to enter, pull out of IMO.
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Old Today, 11:37 AM
 
123 posts, read 30,974 times
Reputation: 398
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted Bear View Post
...and when did it become "fashionable" to face the garage toward the street?

Why do people have such a problem with this? Who wants to try to maneuver their car around every time they leave/arrive? The average number of times a garage door is opened is 3-4x a day, so you can figure having to pull in/back out at least that many times.


It's one thing if you don't park in your garage or if you have enough land to have a sweeping curve to the driveway, but that house clearly has no choice but to have a straight driveway.



The 'snout house' complaint always struck me a urban hipster nonsense that is basically car hate. Bad news: not everyone live in a city with reliable and safe public transportation, and most families own at least one car. Being able to easily use my vehicle is more important to me than a fancy front porch that nobody uses anymore.
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Old Today, 11:56 AM
 
3,891 posts, read 995,374 times
Reputation: 4445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Its is funny that the new developments are 4,000 sf but still being built as traditional styles, such as this one near us.








But, when they demolish a Seattle Victorian, they replace it with a big ugly box that just doesn't go at all with the neighborhood, and in many cases the developer buys and demolishes two or 3 homes and replaces them like this:

We are starting to see more of the "big, grey box w/ some wood thrown in there" in Raleigh, too. Not sure what they are called, but anywhere they are, they (are possibly intended to) stick out like a sore thumb, and ginormous. The only "normal" sized one I've seen is https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2.../6375821_zpid/

Another trick is, as you mentioned, a house that looks like a little cottage in the front, but is really 4-5 BD, 3000+ SF with a full basement, and $700k+ in the right area. I wonder if this "inconspicuous consumption" trend started during the recession when it was uncouth to flaunt. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2.../6499443_zpid/

However, some builders are getting it right, and some are kind of cool!

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/7.../6386796_zpid/ (Not sure what this is called)
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/5...33703200_zpid/ (Or this)
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/8...53459668_zpid/ (the "super Charleston")
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3.../6430854_zpid/ (the "mini castle")
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Old Today, 12:34 PM
 
346 posts, read 291,315 times
Reputation: 1266
Ugh, I loathe the garage door as front focal point. Nothing traditional about it.

I live in small southern city with a major University. We have a neighborhood of bungalows and a smattering of vintage two stories.

Then came the rash of tear downs. Three story faux bungalows with separate garage/apartment in the rear on these narrow lots. Terrible for the one story bungalows next door.

So the neighborhood got together and passed a Neighborhood Protection Order, an NPO, and got them banned.
They used a watershed protection regulation, too much water run off from all the roofs, not enough permeable surface, and an old regulation that every house had to have a tall shade tree. To accommodate the garage apartments they cut down the shade trees. Boom! Developers gone.
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Old Today, 12:35 PM
 
44 posts, read 8,192 times
Reputation: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodyum View Post
I believe most people would think 800 square feet for a family of 4 is too small. That is considered a tiny house. Most want 3 bedrooms for different gender children. So the 3 bedrooms alone take up half the sq footage. Add a bathroom, some closets and you barely have room for a small combo kitchen/dining/living room. i google house plans and couldn’t find many with the 3rd bedroom. Surprised many on this thread think families want this, especially families who home school and need classroom space.
I do agree with this. We have three people in this house and even that is cutting it. But there's quite a large difference between 800 sq ft and these 3000 sq ft monsters that are popping up everywhere.
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Old Today, 12:45 PM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
14,153 posts, read 20,644,267 times
Reputation: 23112
Quote:
Originally Posted by b-nasty View Post
Why do people have such a problem with this? .
Because garages belong in the back on the alley.
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Old Today, 01:00 PM
 
123 posts, read 30,974 times
Reputation: 398
Quote:
Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post
Because garages belong in the back on the alley.

Sorry, just a big, grassy backyard with back-porch, swing-set, fire pit, shed, and garden back there, and woods behind that. I like looking out my back kitchen window and seeing my private slice of nature, not trash cans and alley cats.
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Old Today, 01:16 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
30,314 posts, read 55,239,559 times
Reputation: 31907
Quote:
Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post
Because garages belong in the back on the alley.
There are no alleys in our city, behind our homes are the backyards of other homes. I fail to understand the reason for some people to dislike garages in the front of the house, which are normal. I have lived in
7 cities in 2 states and have never seen a garage behind the house in an alley except when visiting Vancouver, B.C. and in a fairly new development that's considered an "urban village" in a nearby city.
Personally, I would prefer a detached 4 car garage with 12' roll-up doors.
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