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Old Yesterday, 12:09 AM
 
7,237 posts, read 3,994,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted Bear View Post
...and when did it become "fashionable" to face the garage toward the street?


Or is it just less costly to build in that manner?
I would say that began around the 1940's when many houses began to be created with attached garages. Before that garages also faced the street but were often at the back of the yard and accessed by a long driveway from the street, past the house and into the backyard. It is the rare area where front facing garages are not prevalent.

Let's face it, cars come from the street to the garage so the most efficient layout is to have the garage face the street.
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Old Yesterday, 12:21 AM
 
7,237 posts, read 3,994,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
About a century ago when people started driving cars instead of carriages.

Although I personally prefer my alley facing garage in a planned urban community neighborhood where almost none of the houses have front facing garages or driveways, and it's far more pleasant to take a stroll around the neighborhood.

We have side yards instead of backyards, but they are small to encourage people to utilize public parks and green space and interact with their neighbors.
At least that is what the developers would have you believe. They can certainly build more houses (they call them "homes") on postage stamp sized lots than houses on decent sized lots that people can choose to utilize as they wish, but the profitability is different. High density housing is not for everyone.
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Old Yesterday, 12:31 AM
 
7,237 posts, read 3,994,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
On new construction homes on the verge of exurbia, there are planned communities, having all the space in the world at their disposal, who choose to have "alleys" out back. Effectively naming only every other street in the grid.

Example: Briar Chapel in Chapel Hill, NC: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Br...!4d-79.1013533
Horrible! No front yards; no backyards; no privacy. "Please pass the salt" takes on an entirely new meaning. But somebody allowed the zoning to permit such high density and someone must be buying them.
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Old Yesterday, 12:34 AM
 
7,237 posts, read 3,994,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
There is much less city alley entry down south, as in "city blocks with dark, creepy alleys". In the development referenced in my last post, you have streets lit just the same, only it's a row of 2-car garages instead of home fronts.

You pull your car into your garage, close the door behind you. The detached garage has a door which opens up to a walkway in your 6-ft-privacy-fenced-in back yard. You proceed to your back or side door, secured.

Look at this small neighborhood of concentric streets. Conifer Cir being home fronts, Conifer Park Ln serving the garages of those homes and the home fronts of the next ring of homes!

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Co...!4d-84.3630771
The only thing missing is the conifers. And the space to grow them.
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Old Yesterday, 05:06 AM
 
Location: Gainesville, FL
355 posts, read 77,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kokonutty View Post
I would say that began around the 1940's when many houses began to be created with attached garages. Before that garages also faced the street but were often at the back of the yard and accessed by a long driveway from the street, past the house and into the backyard. It is the rare area where front facing garages are not prevalent.

Let's face it, cars come from the street to the garage so the most efficient layout is to have the garage face the street.
We did experience this in Milwaukee, having a garage at the rear of the property but the driveway comes from the front. We will never live in a place like that again bc snow removal is a nightmare! That particular house was built in the late 1890s and many others in that neighborhood had the same setup as that area didnít have back alleys. Dealing with snow adds another layer of complication but detached garages are very common up north just bc they didnít build houses with attached garages when most of the older neighborhoods were built.

Down here in Florida, the trend for new upscale neighborhoods is the back alley but usually the garages are attached. Theyíre just connected to the back of the house and there is little yard space. Most of these lots are about .15 acres. Great for people who are retiring or otherwise donít want to do yard work. Not great for families who value outdoor time or have big vehicles they canít maneuver down the alleys bc they are pretty tight. Tighter than most Iíve seen up north.
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Old Yesterday, 05:15 AM
 
Location: Gainesville, FL
355 posts, read 77,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Passenger vans are certainly classified and often used as commercial vehicles, dependent on specs and design. I purposely avoid parking near any four door truck or large van in any parking lot due to not being able to see around them well at all...
Ask my insurance if itís commercial use. Iíd be paying about double or more than what it is now. Itís not a cargo van, there are 12 seating positions in it and Iím not running a daycare or shuttle service. Thatís not the point. The point is that itís my family vehicle and I should be allowed to park it in my expensive houseís driveway if it wonít fit in my expensive houseís garage. Itís literally one inch too tall to clear the opening. I could fit lengthwise in our current garage. And yes it is long, about 3í longer than my previous minivan bc it has four rows plus cargo space. Iím glad you wonít park by me bc itís hard to park and people like to park right next to me for some reason which makes it difficult for me to get back out. So thanks for doing us both a favor.
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Old Yesterday, 05:31 AM
 
39,058 posts, read 15,328,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddm2k View Post
We are starting to see more of the "big, grey box w/ some wood thrown in there" in Raleigh, too. Not sure what they are called, but anywhere they are, they (are possibly intended to) stick out like a sore thumb, and ginormous. The only "normal" sized one I've seen is https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2.../6375821_zpid/

Another trick is, as you mentioned, a house that looks like a little cottage in the front, but is really 4-5 BD, 3000+ SF with a full basement, and $700k+ in the right area. I wonder if this "inconspicuous consumption" trend started during the recession when it was uncouth to flaunt. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/2.../6499443_zpid/

However, some builders are getting it right, and some are kind of cool!

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/7.../6386796_zpid/ (Not sure what this is called)
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/5...33703200_zpid/ (Or this)
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/8...53459668_zpid/ (the "super Charleston")
https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3.../6430854_zpid/ (the "mini castle")
Good examples of the various exteriors.
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Old Yesterday, 05:39 AM
 
39,058 posts, read 15,328,975 times
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We raised our children in a 100 y/o home with only one bathroom upstairs with the bedrooms. It was a major drawback when it came time sell. Buyers all wanted a master bedroom ensuite bathroom as well as a "powder room" on the main floor.

It was a comfortable home with a sunporch, fireplace, full basement, ... and lots of complaints because we didn't have walk-in closets.

We had a detached garage. Folks wanted an attached garage.

When you add up multiple bathrooms, walk-in closets, attached garages, offices, family rooms, ... you end up with a large house. If you don't have alleys and want a large backyard, you end up with the garage front and center.

As lots get smaller, and homes get larger, it is easy to see how things get ugly.
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Old Yesterday, 05:39 AM
 
934 posts, read 636,486 times
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I live in a community where most homes have alley garages, big front porches. Its beautiful and people do sit outside, they get to know their neighbors, its very friendly here. I live on a street with custom homes we had to have driveways out front because behind us is the Golf course. If I could have I would have put a garage out back. But I do love the fact I live in this amazing community.
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Old Yesterday, 06:33 AM
 
Location: Gainesville, FL
355 posts, read 77,849 times
Reputation: 449
Quote:
Originally Posted by cp102 View Post
I live in a community where most homes have alley garages, big front porches. Its beautiful and people do sit outside, they get to know their neighbors, its very friendly here. I live on a street with custom homes we had to have driveways out front because behind us is the Golf course. If I could have I would have put a garage out back. But I do love the fact I live in this amazing community.
Sounds like an introvertís nightmare.

Seriously, though, I have met most of my neighbors when getting in and out of my car in the driveway.
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