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Old 09-03-2019, 02:48 AM
 
7,256 posts, read 4,015,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mSooner View Post
We are interested in a home that has had the pool recently filled in--I can tell it is recent because you can still see the pool via Google Maps and the pictures on the listing show fresh dirtwork.

What would you want to ask to know/ask to ensure the work was done correctly?
What makes you think it was filled in rather than demolished and removed?
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Old 09-03-2019, 04:52 AM
 
Location: Southern Most New Jersey
1,204 posts, read 863,725 times
Reputation: 2001
I would want documentation of proper removal. Not just pushed in and filled in. I would want photographs of work in progress and completion. I have done this with major repairs on my existing house.

And regarding old pools. I was interested in one house in DE that had an old pool. Realtor told me to remove the pool properly would be around 10K.
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Old 09-03-2019, 05:37 AM
 
Location: Gainesville, FL
359 posts, read 90,198 times
Reputation: 469
Some people in my area listed their house with a bad pool that needed a complete overhaul. The docs said $35k estimate for repairs if I recall. It sat for months. Like 6 or 8 months. The listing expired and it was relisted with another agent after the work was done. Pretty sure it’s still sitting. It’s Florida and it’s an average pool, nothing special, and a 2/2 in a neighborhood dominated by families. It’s overpriced IMO but they have to get their money back out for those repairs. I think they should have just filled it in.
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Old 09-03-2019, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
1,506 posts, read 676,142 times
Reputation: 3589
Anytime you bury anything, if it isn't done with proper compaction, I would expect there would be a risk of the ground sinking later which can be a headache.
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Old 09-03-2019, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
33,965 posts, read 59,049,098 times
Reputation: 32867
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOinGA View Post
Anytime you bury anything, if it isn't done with proper compaction, I would expect there would be a risk of the ground sinking later which can be a headache.
Especially if it is a pile of tree debris, stumps, etc.
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Old 09-03-2019, 10:34 AM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
1,475 posts, read 1,431,185 times
Reputation: 1020
We filled in our pool because it needed repairs and after the kids all moved out we found ourselves not using it. We had the bottom jackhammered up and the sides collapsed down about 3'. Pools equipment and most of the lines were torn out. I had it filled with road base and topped with 18 inches of topsoil.
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Old 09-03-2019, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
1,506 posts, read 676,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
Especially if it is a pile of tree debris, stumps, etc.
Oh, yes. A friend bought a house in the Atlanta area that was built in the 1980's. The ground started to fall away under their front walkway. They found out the front yard had been used to bury trees when the subdivision was built. Tens of thousands of dollars to remediate the problem...I think ultimately they spent over $30K....exacerbated by using a company the first time that did not warranty their work and did not solve the problem. When they sold the house, they had to disclose that there had been a sinkhole. At least by then they had used a company that would warranty the fix. I wouldn't expect a filled-in or demolished pool to create that degree of a problem, but even less severe sinking or developing hollow spots can become an issue.
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Old 09-03-2019, 11:47 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
30,438 posts, read 55,405,915 times
Reputation: 32181
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Guy997S View Post
This is spot on!


My buddy lived in a house for 20 years with a pool. Dad was in construction, brought home a bulldozer one day and filled in the pool. Caved the walls in/backfilled with dirt. Pool was gone.

Best part 15+ years later someone we knew bought the house and my buddy told them about the "treasure" buried in the back yard.

Not sure why you would need a permit to demo a pool.........it is buried, not sure you could do it wrong.
There is a right way to do it, and that is collapsing the walls and compacting the fill. Otherwise it can become a severe hazard in the future. When a big rain storm comes, the pool fills up with water and a sinkhole develops someone may fall into it. Even normal settling can cause a hazard. It's in a backyard where typically kids play, so should be done according to local code.
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Old 09-03-2019, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
33,965 posts, read 59,049,098 times
Reputation: 32867
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOinGA View Post
Oh, yes. A friend bought a house in the Atlanta area that was built in the 1980's. The ground started to fall away under their front walkway. They found out the front yard had been used to bury trees when the subdivision was built. Tens of thousands of dollars to remediate the problem...I think ultimately they spent over $30K....exacerbated by using a company the first time that did not warranty their work and did not solve the problem. When they sold the house, they had to disclose that there had been a sinkhole. At least by then they had used a company that would warranty the fix. I wouldn't expect a filled-in or demolished pool to create that degree of a problem, but even less severe sinking or developing hollow spots can become an issue.



Dig around in Weird News stuff, and I bet you can find all sorts of crap used for fill.
Buried cars, oil tanks, furniture, water heaters, Jimmy Hoffa, who knows what?
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Old 09-03-2019, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,493 posts, read 6,370,703 times
Reputation: 11852
Quote:
Originally Posted by petsandgardens View Post
Why fill in a pool just before selling...someone may want the pool. someone may want to fix that skimmer, that built in hot tub, those few cracks. BUT sounds like it's probably more than simple fixes so the owners just filled it in.
Because it isn't a selling point in much (most?) of the country. Many people see a pool as an expensive liability that consumes valuable yard space.

FWIW, could it have been an above ground pool?
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