U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-27-2019, 08:07 AM
 
Location: East Coast
3,299 posts, read 2,009,231 times
Reputation: 4991

Advertisements

As an attorney, I had to laugh and then cry while reading this thread.

YIKES.

I think the real lesson is don't lease to jerks. Of course the attorney category contains a higher number of jerks than average, but by no means has it cornered the market. (I'd really like to use a word other than "jerks" but I don't believe C-D will allow it.)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
I wouldn't want anything to do with an attorney unless I hired him/her for some reason. It was bad enough when we sold our house to an IRS agent who did audits. We were on pins and needles for several years. I recently had two different attorneys apply for my openings that only pay $50-60k in Seattle, unrelated to law. There is no way they got interviews.
Were you extraordinarily difficult during the process -- to the extent that the agent would be so upset by your behavior that they would go out of their way to cause you to be subject to an audit?

When you say "openings," I'm assuming you own some kind of business or are advertising job openings. I find it unfortunate that you wouldn't even interview someone who is an attorney who is looking to leave the profession and use their skills in a different setting. While attorneys may have a bad reputation, the majority of them really are decent people. While being an attorney is not an indicator that someone is smart and hard working, neither is it an indication that they are not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by twinkletwinkle22 View Post
Someone's profession is not a protected class and cannot be the basis for discrimination suit.

I read years back about an HOA that passed an amendment to their docs that prohibited any future sale to a lawyer. This was because of previous bad acts by an attorney-owner and they didn't want to have it happen again. Went to the state Supreme Ct (I don't know which state) and HOA won. Profession is not a protected class.
Would love to see that article. Although didn't the HOA have an attorney? I would expect they would have liked their own attorney.


Unfortunately, some attorneys are quite savvy and because they understand the legal process, also know all the tricks to delay the process. HOWEVER, I used to do evictions, and I can tell you that there are PLENTY of people who are not attorneys who understand just as well how to delay the process. I was amazed, both when i did foreclosures and evictions, at just how long people could live without paying any rent and without paying many other bills if they didn't care at all about their credit rating or reputation. First payment default on a mortgage because the family decided to use the mortgage payment for a trip to Disney World? I've seen it. And the people were not attorneys.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-27-2019, 08:16 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
30,661 posts, read 55,736,973 times
Reputation: 32521
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
As an attorney, I had to laugh and then cry while reading this thread.

YIKES.

I think the real lesson is don't lease to jerks. Of course the attorney category contains a higher number of jerks than average, but by no means has it cornered the market. (I'd really like to use a word other than "jerks" but I don't believe C-D will allow it.)




Were you extraordinarily difficult during the process -- to the extent that the agent would be so upset by your behavior that they would go out of their way to cause you to be subject to an audit?

When you say "openings," I'm assuming you own some kind of business or are advertising job openings. I find it unfortunate that you wouldn't even interview someone who is an attorney who is looking to leave the profession and use their skills in a different setting. While attorneys may have a bad reputation, the majority of them really are decent people. While being an attorney is not an indicator that someone is smart and hard working, neither is it an indication that they are not.




Would love to see that article. Although didn't the HOA have an attorney? I would expect they would have liked their own attorney.


Unfortunately, some attorneys are quite savvy and because they understand the legal process, also know all the tricks to delay the process. HOWEVER, I used to do evictions, and I can tell you that there are PLENTY of people who are not attorneys who understand just as well how to delay the process. I was amazed, both when i did foreclosures and evictions, at just how long people could live without paying any rent and without paying many other bills if they didn't care at all about their credit rating or reputation. First payment default on a mortgage because the family decided to use the mortgage payment for a trip to Disney World? I've seen it. And the people were not attorneys.

Yes, in fact, the buyer (IRS agent) was difficult after the sale regarding both a microwave and a tree, no need to go into the details.


Where I work (as a hiring manager) we often work with the attorneys in our legal department. Those openings were administrative and an attorney would be far over qualified, but even if they did want to go into another direction at 1/3 the pay, I would anticipate conflicts over legal advice and decisions in the course of our work.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2019, 08:25 AM
 
Location: East Coast
3,299 posts, read 2,009,231 times
Reputation: 4991
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Where I work (as a hiring manager) we often work with the attorneys in our legal department. Those openings were administrative and an attorney would be far over qualified, but even if they did want to go into another direction at 1/3 the pay, I would anticipate conflicts over legal advice and decisions in the course of our work.
I wouldn't assume that 50-60K was 1/3 the pay they were getting. It might be more than they're getting now. In some cases, maybe even significantly more. The attorney market is beyond oversaturated. People think attorneys are rolling in dough, and while there certainly are quite a few who are, the majority of attorneys out there are not. You may be shocked to learn this, but even in a city like Seattle, I can guarantee you there are attorneys out there making half of what you are offering for that position. The market got bad in the 90s and has gotten worse just about every year since. I've read and heard some true horror stories.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2019, 08:28 AM
 
137 posts, read 65,800 times
Reputation: 206
Quote:
Originally Posted by nuts2uiam View Post
Looks like you could be caught between a rock and a hard place. If you advertise a place for rent and then refuse due to his/her profession you might be stetting yourself up for a discriminatory practice suit.
But you are allowed to refuse a tenant based off of income restrictions/requirements. You are allowed to screen the tenant for credit report, prior evictions, employment verification etc. I had numerous applicants apply to rent my rental property and most didn't make a sufficient amount to even rent it and cover the utility expenses therefore the Landlord is entitled to go through all the applications and screen the tenants etc. to find the most qualified and best applicant. Also, landlords can refuse you if you have pets.

Personally, I feel like if they are dirty people and bring the mice then it shouldn't be the landlord's problem if there was never a mice issue before but usually the landlord is held responsible.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2019, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Boise
615 posts, read 596,444 times
Reputation: 1349
Attorneys are not a protected class, so use your best judgement on if you would rent to one.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2019, 12:05 PM
 
Location: White House, TN
5,753 posts, read 4,040,754 times
Reputation: 3667
Depends on the type of attorney.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2019, 12:44 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
14,012 posts, read 19,142,087 times
Reputation: 24967
I know my aunt rented her lil house to an attorney and he kept the place cleaner than some women I know . everytime I saw the place it was pristine and he helped my aunt keep the flower garden she planted in front of the house so nice and he went out and weeded it once a week on Saturday . My aunt said he was an excellent cook . So there is always bad and good in most proffessions . But rent to whom you want too .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2019, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Texas
10,850 posts, read 4,142,558 times
Reputation: 21475
Quote:
Originally Posted by nuts2uiam View Post
Looks like you could be caught between a rock and a hard place. If you advertise a place for rent and then refuse due to his/her profession you might be stetting yourself up for a discriminatory practice suit.
Nope, not at all. Occupation is not a protected class.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2019, 01:44 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
23,223 posts, read 29,694,259 times
Reputation: 45718
In some states, occupation is a protected class. It doesn't say "lawyers are a protected class" it says "source of income is a protected class".


If the lawyer gets his income from being a lawyer, he falls under a protected class. He can not be legally rejected because practicing law is his source of income.



Be very careful that you know your state and local landlord laws before you start assuming someone or something is not protected by law.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2019, 04:27 PM
 
1,149 posts, read 1,760,843 times
Reputation: 1193
Here's a novel concept. Advertise it for rent with "attorneys preferred" in the advert. The first person to complain that your discriminating against them for not being an attorney... there's your new tenant.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top