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Old 10-08-2019, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
9,209 posts, read 18,303,430 times
Reputation: 6929

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Quote:
Originally Posted by iSudo View Post
...Others asked for feedback as to why they didn't get the job. ...
Quote:
Originally Posted by bande1102 View Post
I have never asked any interviewer why I didn't get the job. I move on. .....
Quote:
Originally Posted by arjay57 View Post
I think it's a little off-putting to be asked, "Why didn't you pick me?"

...
So is it safe to say that you all, when you're selling a home, don't want feedback on what buyers thought about your home or why they didn't buy it over the others? After all, it's sort of the same thing.

iSudo, unless I'm mistaken you were complaining about lack of feedback from your agent on another of the multiple threads you've started.
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Old 10-08-2019, 08:31 AM
 
155 posts, read 43,043 times
Reputation: 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Hoffman View Post
So is it safe to say that you all, when you're selling a home, don't want feedback on what buyers thought about your home or why they didn't buy it over the others? After all, it's sort of the same thing.

iSudo, unless I'm mistaken you were complaining about lack of feedback from your agent on another of the multiple threads you've started.
I'm not complaining about the task of giving feedback here. I'm expressing concern over the manner in which it was requested, the responses I received when I offered it, and the general tone of some of the responses to receiving a "rejection" email. I found the behavior, in some cases, to be unprofessional.


Rejected Agent #1 essentially chewed my head off and said I was making a big mistake by going with another agent. Unprofessional and hostile.

Rejected Agent #2 alluded to the idea that they were at a disadvantage because they didn't interview last. We liked someone else's personality better and thought they were a better fit for what we needed in this particular transaction: experience and an 'I got this handled' mentality. Now imagine if I told the rejected agent that verbatim. You think they're going to roll over and take that without some sort of rebuttal of why they in fact have those qualities, too? I don't have the time or energy to go back and forth with them justifying my opinions. As I'm sure you know, a hungry sales person is often relentless in their pursuit of business, even if that means trying to have a prospective client second guess their decisions.

Rejected Agent #3 asked me for information on who I decided to go with. They can look this up when the listing goes active.


Have you considered maybe this is why people are hesitant to give direct feedback to agents in fear of receiving backlash?

You can't compare it to buyer feedback, because that feedback is indirect and channeled through a buffer. The seller has no way of reaching back out to them to reject their views or chastise them for their opinions.
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Old 10-08-2019, 08:40 AM
 
10,788 posts, read 12,689,234 times
Reputation: 15340
Quote:
Originally Posted by iSudo View Post
My spouse and I don't interview real estate agents often, but our most recent experience has been quite alarming and eye opening. First off, we're both working professionals. When we interview for positions and don't get the offer, it's par for the course to count your losses and just move on to the next thing. It's certainly a major faux pas to badger your interviewer as to why you didn't get the job.

Last week, we interviewed four agents. The first agent was from one of the "big box" agencies that center around the online experience. This agent was by far one of the most belligerent and hostile of the pack. In one of our initial follow-ups, he boasted about how he was #1 in the region and how his ego was hurt because we considered other agents over him. His response to the "rejection" email was by far the most shocking thing my spouse or I have experienced during this process. He explained how we were making a big mistake with choosing another agent, and how (he assumed) we were given inaccurate portrayals of his agency by these other agents. Funny thing is that none of the other agents we interviewed had any idea who else we had interviewed.

The other batch of responses were far less hostile, but still a bit intrusive in my opinion. Some asked who else we went with. Others asked for feedback as to why they didn't get the job. Some even alluded to the idea that since they weren't interviewed last, that they missed out on the opportunity. Granted, we liked 3 of the 4 agents very much. They were all referrals to us by peers and friends. At the end of the day, we made the best decision we could based on gut instinct.

Now, color me ignorant, but this behavior was completely unexpected and left us both feeling uneasy about this process. As I said before, working in professional settings for over a decade, it is generally ill-advised to badger your interviewer as to why you were rejected for a position. The best course of action is to say "thank you" and move on to the next opportunity.

Do these same rules not apply to real estate agents?


Sounds like agent #1 was Frederick from Million Dollar listing NYC!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4nnDNGmSZ_I
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Old 10-08-2019, 08:46 AM
 
155 posts, read 43,043 times
Reputation: 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Guy997S View Post
Sounds like agent #1 was Frederick from Million Dollar listing NYC!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4nnDNGmSZ_I
It was clear his strategy was to cast doubt in our minds about our choices and to pretend he didn't need us as much as we needed him. I'm not an idiot, I know basic human psychology. I fed his ego a little bit in our exchange in emails, and it wasn't long before he was willing to work with us. That's what it takes with those types of people, you have to bow down to their egos and tell them what they want/need to hear in order to move forward.

Of course, we ultimately went with another agent, because he came across as a repugnant, arrogant jerk during the course of our interactions. Not to mention, his "big box" agency gives agents more incentive in selling volume than selling for best price. We didn't want to feel pressured down the road with him to accept some low ball offer so he could collect a bonus.
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Old 10-08-2019, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,622 posts, read 6,486,829 times
Reputation: 12019
Quote:
Originally Posted by iSudo View Post
My spouse and I don't interview real estate agents often, but our most recent experience has been quite alarming and eye opening. First off, we're both working professionals. When we interview for positions and don't get the offer, it's par for the course to count your losses and just move on to the next thing. It's certainly a major faux pas to badger your interviewer as to why you didn't get the job.

Last week, we interviewed four agents. The first agent was from one of the "big box" agencies that center around the online experience. This agent was by far one of the most belligerent and hostile of the pack. In one of our initial follow-ups, he boasted about how he was #1 in the region and how his ego was hurt because we considered other agents over him. His response to the "rejection" email was by far the most shocking thing my spouse or I have experienced during this process. He explained how we were making a big mistake with choosing another agent, and how (he assumed) we were given inaccurate portrayals of his agency by these other agents. Funny thing is that none of the other agents we interviewed had any idea who else we had interviewed.
That's totally unprofessional and out of line, but what are you going to do?

Quote:
Originally Posted by iSudo View Post
The other batch of responses were far less hostile, but still a bit intrusive in my opinion. Some asked who else we went with. Others asked for feedback as to why they didn't get the job.
That's smart, professional behavior. It is common to ask why one didn't earn the bid/business in my industry; it's expected. We get 20-30% response rates on that.
Quote:
Originally Posted by iSudo View Post
Some even alluded to the idea that since they weren't interviewed last, that they missed out on the opportunity. Granted, we liked 3 of the 4 agents very much. They were all referrals to us by peers and friends. At the end of the day, we made the best decision we could based on gut instinct.

Now, color me ignorant, but this behavior was completely unexpected and left us both feeling uneasy about this process. As I said before, working in professional settings for over a decade, it is generally ill-advised to badger your interviewer as to why you were rejected for a position. The best course of action is to say "thank you" and move on to the next opportunity.

Do these same rules not apply to real estate agents?
I disagree, one must confront their own shortcomings to be best prepared for the next opportunity. Here's the thing. You think of it as a job interview. They think of it as a potential client; a sale. If you don't know why you aren't getting the sale or earning clients, you're never going to learn and grow.
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Old 10-08-2019, 09:10 AM
 
155 posts, read 43,043 times
Reputation: 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
I disagree, one must confront their own shortcomings to be best prepared for the next opportunity. Here's the thing. You think of it as a job interview. They think of it as a potential client; a sale. If you don't know why you aren't getting the sale or earning clients, you're never going to learn and grow.
Making a sale is absolutely no different from getting a job. I can make the same argument that as a "rejected" job candidate, I need feedback so that I can continue to grow and ultimately win against the competition. At the end of the day, both scenarios are about selling your personal brand and putting money in your wallet.

The reason I use this comparison is because I've often heard it said that hiring managers or companies refuse to follow up with specific feedback to rejected candidates to avoid situations like I describe above, where candidates refuse to accept the decision and attempt to make the argument that a grave mistake was made. That's why they send out generic, automated emails simply stating they found a candidate that better fit what they were looking for. Usually those emails are also from a no-reply inbox.
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Old 10-08-2019, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Salem, OR
14,155 posts, read 33,409,264 times
Reputation: 13182
Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
I disagree, one must confront their own shortcomings to be best prepared for the next opportunity. Here's the thing. You think of it as a job interview. They think of it as a potential client; a sale. If you don't know why you aren't getting the sale or earning clients, you're never going to learn and grow.
Yes but that is what friends and colleagues are for. You can ask them to listen to your listening presentation and give you honest and brutal feedback. No need to badger consumers for that.
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Old 10-08-2019, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Stuck on the East Coast, hoping to head West
3,870 posts, read 9,421,623 times
Reputation: 7606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Hoffman View Post
So is it safe to say that you all, when you're selling a home, don't want feedback on what buyers thought about your home or why they didn't buy it over the others? After all, it's sort of the same thing.
No, I did not find buyer feedback useful at all.

1) no offer is pretty obvious feedback.

2) all of my feedback was positive and comments were that my property was priced correctly, but no offers (see number 1).

3) once you get feedback, you are working backwards. You either have to take the house off the market and rehab (condition) or lower your price (chase the market). That's exactly the position I don't want to be in.

4)Assuming you took agent's advice regarding pricing, is it really a pricing/condition of the house issue or a marketing issue? I know far too many agents who suck at marketing, but will always blame condition/price.

I expect my listing agent, who presumably has far more experience with buyers and their wants/needs than I'd ever get from feedback surveys, to advise me on price and condition BEFORE my house hits the market.

Feedback sounds useful in theory, but, I'd argue, it's just a tool agents use to camouflage their failings (not pricing correctly, not understanding the market conditions, or not marketing correctly).
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Old 10-08-2019, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
34,120 posts, read 59,369,164 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bande1102 View Post
No, I did not find buyer feedback useful at all.

1) no offer is pretty obvious feedback.

2) all of my feedback was positive and comments were that my property was priced correctly, but no offers (see number 1).

3) once you get feedback, you are working backwards. You either have to take the house off the market and rehab (condition) or lower your price (chase the market). That's exactly the position I don't want to be in.

4)Assuming you took agent's advice regarding pricing, is it really a pricing/condition of the house issue or a marketing issue? I know far too many agents who suck at marketing, but will always blame condition/price.

I expect my listing agent, who presumably has far more experience with buyers and their wants/needs than I'd ever get from feedback surveys, to advise me on price and condition BEFORE my house hits the market.

Feedback sounds useful in theory, but, I'd argue, it's just a tool agents use to camouflage their failings (not pricing correctly, not understanding the market conditions, or not marketing correctly).



1. Yes, but....
Sometimes buyer feedback has buying signs in it. "When would the seller like to close?" "Is the washer/dryer set negotiable?" "When was the HVAC system last serviced?" These are buying signs.
Sometimes buyer feedback includes questions or evidence of misunderstanding.
These have potential to be turned into sales, for sellers who pay a modicum of attention.

2. That just covered up what buyers were thinking. I never ask about price on listings.

3. That doesn't make sense. When you get feedback, you join the conversation. Some people need to dance with you before they buy.

4. Meh. All the advice in the world is made less helpful when the seller wants to throw 25% fat into the price for "wiggle room."
At that point, the agent has to decide to list or go home.

As you say, you don't respect the sales process regarding use of feedback so you aren't paying attention to feedback, but you will need to for your "theory" to hold water.

And, I don't even get too wrapped up in feedback. I just have an understanding of the dynamic.
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Old 10-08-2019, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
9,209 posts, read 18,303,430 times
Reputation: 6929
Quote:
Originally Posted by bande1102 View Post
...
I expect my listing agent, who presumably has far more experience with buyers and their wants/needs than I'd ever get from feedback surveys, to advise me on price and condition BEFORE my house hits the market.

Feedback sounds useful in theory, but, I'd argue, it's just a tool agents use to camouflage their failings (not pricing correctly, not understanding the market conditions, or not marketing correctly).
I agree as an agent on your prior points. The lack of an offer is usually all I really need to know. I can tell people the issues and don't have to rely on feedback and any good agent should be able to do so as well. I think feedback is generally useless, yet most sellers still want it. However, occasionally I do get useful information or ideas that I hadn't considered previously.

However, to my point, many sellers are here saying the agent shouldn't ask for feedback on why they didn't get hired but still expect feedback on showings. I was merely pointing to the hypocrisy.

Feedback - I ask 3 questions: Are they considering an offer and if not why did they rule it out? If I had to sell the home in 2 weeks, what would it need to be priced at? If they bought another property, can you share the address so I can see what the competition looked like?

#3 is very interesting when I get answers to see where we're losing buyers to. New construction is a real killer when you're competing with it.
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