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Old 10-08-2019, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
9,209 posts, read 18,303,430 times
Reputation: 6929

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Quote:
Originally Posted by iSudo View Post
...
I'm not complaining about the task of giving feedback here. I'm expressing concern over the manner in which it was requested, the responses I received when I offered it, and the general tone of some of the responses to receiving a "rejection" email. I found the behavior, in some cases, to be unprofessional.
....
Have you considered maybe this is why people are hesitant to give direct feedback to agents in fear of receiving backlash?

You can't compare it to buyer feedback, because that feedback is indirect and channeled through a buffer. The seller has no way of reaching back out to them to reject their views or chastise them for their opinions.
The concept is the same, regardless of whether there is a buffer or not. So what, you didn't like a response from an agent. Let it go and move on. I'm starting to see a common denominator in all the problems, which really don't have to be a problem.
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Old 10-08-2019, 01:11 PM
 
Location: 49th parallel
2,763 posts, read 1,468,007 times
Reputation: 5724
One of our properties is in a small town. I would NEVER, NEVER interview realtors before selling this particular house. I would find out everything possible that I could from friends, neighbors, etc.etc., about their experiences with different realtors, before choosing one - without an interview.

Reason: some small places are fairly clannish, and despite wanting to make sales, etc., a realtor can decide not to show your place. Or to show it as seldom as possible. I have seen situations where a realtor would not show a house listed by an out-of-town realtor. I wouldn't want to do anything to jeopardize the number of showings my house might get by this attitude. If I annoyed a realtor by interviewing him and then not listing with him, he might very easily decide to put my house on his "no show" list.
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Old 10-08-2019, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Stuck on the East Coast, hoping to head West
3,870 posts, read 9,421,623 times
Reputation: 7606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Hoffman View Post
I agree as an agent on your prior points. The lack of an offer is usually all I really need to know. I can tell people the issues and don't have to rely on feedback and any good agent should be able to do so as well. I think feedback is generally useless, yet most sellers still want it. However, occasionally I do get useful information or ideas that I hadn't considered previously.

However, to my point, many sellers are here saying the agent shouldn't ask for feedback on why they didn't get hired but still expect feedback on showings. I was merely pointing to the hypocrisy.

Feedback - I ask 3 questions: Are they considering an offer and if not why did they rule it out? If I had to sell the home in 2 weeks, what would it need to be priced at? If they bought another property, can you share the address so I can see what the competition looked like?

#3 is very interesting when I get answers to see where we're losing buyers to. New construction is a real killer when you're competing with it.
I see your point about hypocrisy and feedback. However, I think the OP makes a valid point in that buyer feedback (at least in my mid-atlantic market) is anonymous. Showings are requested thru an app. As a seller, I had no idea the names of the agent or the buyer. I had no idea who said what. I did occasionally ask my agent and rarely did he tell me. I don't know if this was an overall pattern of not communicating or what. Also, the feedback is about a house, an inanimate object. I know, we all love our houses and probably take things personally regarding the house; but that's just a part of the process of selling it. You can always tell yourself, eh, it's a house.

As a seller, who is going to rely on another agent to bring a buyer, I'd be extremely leery of saying anything potentially negative to another agent because I'd be afraid that agent would steer a potential buyer away from my house. Also, criticizing another human who is trying to make a living, is not something I'd want to do.

I was extremely unhappy with my former agent. I would never in a million years tell him or his staff that. In fact, I actually thanked him for his help and wished him well. Just because I didn't like him---yet am forced to see his face plastered all over grocery carts at my local market, and sometimes smash things into his stupid face---- doesn't mean that I'd risk alienating him. Also, just because I had issues doesn't mean he necessarily needs to change because he is making a living at real estate.
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Old 10-08-2019, 02:43 PM
 
155 posts, read 43,043 times
Reputation: 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Hoffman View Post
The concept is the same, regardless of whether there is a buffer or not. So what, you didn't like a response from an agent. Let it go and move on. I'm starting to see a common denominator in all the problems, which really don't have to be a problem.
Well, we fired one agent for his lousy performance, and rejected others that we didn't like. I think we're moving on just fine. I was just asking a question about whether it's typical that real estate agents behave unprofessionally in these interactions. From the feedback I've received, it sounds like Yes, this can be quite common, because the barrier for entry into the field is quite low and it attracts inept characters trying to make a quick buck in an easy market.
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Old 10-08-2019, 03:54 PM
 
1,195 posts, read 333,895 times
Reputation: 2154
OP,
I would suggest in the future you simply state that you do not provide feedback and your response to those who dispute your decision, "I am sorry you feel that way." "Good luck to you."

The truth of the matter is often the selection of someone, job interviewee or realtor, is based on their soft skills, not something technical like their on-line presence. I have rejected many people (job applicants, vendors, realtors, etc) based on their poor listening skills, evasive answers to my questions, arrogance, etc. After wasting my time with the presentation I am not going to waste more time with giving feedback especially the kind that will not be well received.

I have only made rare exception where there are two equally worthy candidates and felt the "rejected" candidate deserved an explanation.
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Old 10-08-2019, 10:29 PM
 
2,379 posts, read 1,527,334 times
Reputation: 3193
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
"..feedback as to why they didn't get the job..." is hardly unreasonable.

But, my usual message to clients who are classy enough to send me a rejection email is, "I wish you all possible success in selling your home."
That's one size that surely fits all.
I'm not a realtor, but I am in a similar situation in my private practice in that sometimes people don't pick me. If they are kind enough to let me know (which is preferable to getting to the point of setting up an appointment and then suddenly "ghosting" me), I always respond by wishing them well. Every once in a while, one comes back to me later or refers a friend to me. It's all good business.


Quote:
Originally Posted by iSudo View Post
I generally agree that it would be nice to receive feedback as to why you didn't get the job or the contract or what have you. I agree that this information can allow you to grow professional if used wisely.

I think it's generally ill-advised to request this feedback, or on the other end, provide this feedback, because it potentially opens you up to claims of discrimination.
I don't think it's ill-advised to request the feedback- I think it's a reasonable ask (if it's done politely). However, I completely agree that it's often ill-advised to answer that question.

Sorry the tone of those responses were not kind. I haven't had that experience with agents we did not go with. However, we did once have a telemarketer experience that was similar. The telemarketer called, and it was sounding maybe ok, but then a big red flag came up and we said "no thank you." The person CALLED BACK and wanted to know why we changed our mind. We told her we were not interested after we heard more. She called us AGAIN as was getting more and more agitated. This was probably close to 20 years ago, but I still remember it very vividly!
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Old 10-08-2019, 11:22 PM
 
585 posts, read 224,418 times
Reputation: 2088
Quote:
Originally Posted by ndcairngorm View Post
One of our properties is in a small town. I would NEVER, NEVER interview realtors before selling this particular house. I would find out everything possible that I could from friends, neighbors, etc.etc., about their experiences with different realtors, before choosing one - without an interview.

Reason: some small places are fairly clannish, and despite wanting to make sales, etc., a realtor can decide not to show your place. Or to show it as seldom as possible. I have seen situations where a realtor would not show a house listed by an out-of-town realtor. I wouldn't want to do anything to jeopardize the number of showings my house might get by this attitude. If I annoyed a realtor by interviewing him and then not listing with him, he might very easily decide to put my house on his "no show" list.
This is our exact situation. We have not yet listed our home, in a small town. We'd like to talk to 2 or 3 agents but fear what the above post points out, turning entire agencies off our listing because they didn't get it. Human nature ugh. There is nothing like a small town grudge.

A local realtor did a good job selling a small property for us recently and he's in #1 position to get our homes listing (he doesn't know we are selling) but I'm planning to talk to 1 other top agent. Let the chips fall where they may.

I've had dealings with 7 local agents/agencies (small town in Florida where RE is #1 career) and their personalities and company "brand" have a lot to do with how they handle my home sale. Each agency has a market niche and to get our home sold at the best price and terms means choosing the right agent.
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Old 10-09-2019, 10:44 AM
 
155 posts, read 43,043 times
Reputation: 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by twinkletwinkle22 View Post
This is our exact situation. We have not yet listed our home, in a small town. We'd like to talk to 2 or 3 agents but fear what the above post points out, turning entire agencies off our listing because they didn't get it. Human nature ugh. There is nothing like a small town grudge.

The good news for you is that 2.8-3.2% commission is a good incentive to get over a grudge over hurt feelings. Especially in a small town, I'm sure these agents typically can't afford to turn away business. Without that commission, then perhaps you could argue that might run into trouble.

Regarding Rejected Agent #1 in my OP, I'm sure he'd jump at the opportunity to list our home right after he bragged to us that he "told us so", and we massaged his ego a little bit. Money certainly seems to do all the talking in this cut throat business.
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Old 10-09-2019, 06:22 PM
 
521 posts, read 540,285 times
Reputation: 1737
Obviously none of these agents are required to take the mandatory ethics training. How unprofessional to inquire why you didn't get the listing. Kind of like "feedback"...by its nature, it is nothing but negative. You get one time to make a good impression and no one cares about those narcissistic agents...number one or number ten. How your agent impresses you is the point. Sorry you were inundated with questions by those who have no idea how to behave.
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Old Yesterday, 09:46 AM
 
1,195 posts, read 333,895 times
Reputation: 2154
Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnKrause1 View Post
Obviously none of these agents are required to take the mandatory ethics training. How unprofessional to inquire why you didn't get the listing. Kind of like "feedback"...by its nature, it is nothing but negative. You get one time to make a good impression and no one cares about those narcissistic agents...number one or number ten. How your agent impresses you is the point. Sorry you were inundated with questions by those who have no idea how to behave.
Your post reminds me of a colleague's slogan who headed up professional management training: "I conduct management training, not potty training."

Last edited by Maddie104; Yesterday at 09:58 AM..
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