U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old Yesterday, 07:56 AM
 
145 posts, read 38,835 times
Reputation: 162

Advertisements

My spouse and I don't interview real estate agents often, but our most recent experience has been quite alarming and eye opening. First off, we're both working professionals. When we interview for positions and don't get the offer, it's par for the course to count your losses and just move on to the next thing. It's certainly a major faux pas to badger your interviewer as to why you didn't get the job.

Last week, we interviewed four agents. The first agent was from one of the "big box" agencies that center around the online experience. This agent was by far one of the most belligerent and hostile of the pack. In one of our initial follow-ups, he boasted about how he was #1 in the region and how his ego was hurt because we considered other agents over him. His response to the "rejection" email was by far the most shocking thing my spouse or I have experienced during this process. He explained how we were making a big mistake with choosing another agent, and how (he assumed) we were given inaccurate portrayals of his agency by these other agents. Funny thing is that none of the other agents we interviewed had any idea who else we had interviewed.

The other batch of responses were far less hostile, but still a bit intrusive in my opinion. Some asked who else we went with. Others asked for feedback as to why they didn't get the job. Some even alluded to the idea that since they weren't interviewed last, that they missed out on the opportunity. Granted, we liked 3 of the 4 agents very much. They were all referrals to us by peers and friends. At the end of the day, we made the best decision we could based on gut instinct.

Now, color me ignorant, but this behavior was completely unexpected and left us both feeling uneasy about this process. As I said before, working in professional settings for over a decade, it is generally ill-advised to badger your interviewer as to why you were rejected for a position. The best course of action is to say "thank you" and move on to the next opportunity.

Do these same rules not apply to real estate agents?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old Yesterday, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
34,111 posts, read 59,333,210 times
Reputation: 33081
"..feedback as to why they didn't get the job..." is hardly unreasonable.

But, my usual message to clients who are classy enough to send me a rejection email is, "I wish you all possible success in selling your home."
That's one size that surely fits all.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Raleigh NC
10,130 posts, read 7,600,578 times
Reputation: 8743
well, let's write off the belligerent buffoon as unprofessional and unworthy of further concern.

I don't see anything wrong with a relatively gentle "May I ask what factor caused you to choose the other agent?" ... because I do it frequently. Whether you choose to answer or not, it's merely a method for them to possibly improve in the future.

Sometimes it's "they said a higher price" or "they're charging me less" (which is the Seller's option to answer such a confidential matter).

Sometimes it's as simple as "the other agent raved about putting the house on MLS" - and years ago this actually happened to me. Not of course because we wouldn't be on MLS, but it was a simple oversight on my part to forget to mention just a basic everyday thing that OF COURSE was going to happen.

And I don't see anything wrong with applying for a job, having an in-person interview, not getting the job, and following up with the interviewer to ask where you may have fallen short as a choice.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Florida
22,997 posts, read 9,861,564 times
Reputation: 18918
Quote:
Originally Posted by iSudo View Post
My spouse and I don't interview real estate agents often, but our most recent experience has been quite alarming and eye opening. First off, we're both working professionals. When we interview for positions and don't get the offer, it's par for the course to count your losses and just move on to the next thing. It's certainly a major faux pas to badger your interviewer as to why you didn't get the job.

Last week, we interviewed four agents. The first agent was from one of the "big box" agencies that center around the online experience. This agent was by far one of the most belligerent and hostile of the pack. In one of our initial follow-ups, he boasted about how he was #1 in the region and how his ego was hurt because we considered other agents over him. His response to the "rejection" email was by far the most shocking thing my spouse or I have experienced during this process. He explained how we were making a big mistake with choosing another agent, and how (he assumed) we were given inaccurate portrayals of his agency by these other agents. Funny thing is that none of the other agents we interviewed had any idea who else we had interviewed.

The other batch of responses were far less hostile, but still a bit intrusive in my opinion. Some asked who else we went with. Others asked for feedback as to why they didn't get the job. Some even alluded to the idea that since they weren't interviewed last, that they missed out on the opportunity. Granted, we liked 3 of the 4 agents very much. They were all referrals to us by peers and friends. At the end of the day, we made the best decision we could based on gut instinct.

Now, color me ignorant, but this behavior was completely unexpected and left us both feeling uneasy about this process. As I said before, working in professional settings for over a decade, it is generally ill-advised to badger your interviewer as to why you were rejected for a position. The best course of action is to say "thank you" and move on to the next opportunity.

Do these same rules not apply to real estate agents?
Sounds like they've been watching too much Million Dollar Listings where the most aggressive and obnoxious realtors make the big bucks.

You got off easy. We interviewed realtors in 2014, sold the house and moved to another part of the state, and I'm still getting cutesy little spam emails from him (nice guy, but as soon as he started talking drone photos and open houses--knew he was not for us).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 08:32 AM
 
145 posts, read 38,835 times
Reputation: 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoBromhal View Post
well, let's write off the belligerent buffoon as unprofessional and unworthy of further concern.

I don't see anything wrong with a relatively gentle "May I ask what factor caused you to choose the other agent?" ... because I do it frequently. Whether you choose to answer or not, it's merely a method for them to possibly improve in the future.

Sometimes it's "they said a higher price" or "they're charging me less" (which is the Seller's option to answer such a confidential matter).

Sometimes it's as simple as "the other agent raved about putting the house on MLS" - and years ago this actually happened to me. Not of course because we wouldn't be on MLS, but it was a simple oversight on my part to forget to mention just a basic everyday thing that OF COURSE was going to happen.

And I don't see anything wrong with applying for a job, having an in-person interview, not getting the job, and following up with the interviewer to ask where you may have fallen short as a choice.
I generally agree that it would be nice to receive feedback as to why you didn't get the job or the contract or what have you. I agree that this information can allow you to grow professional if used wisely.

I think it's generally ill-advised to request this feedback, or on the other end, provide this feedback, because it potentially opens you up to claims of discrimination. Or worse, as in the first example I provided above, you get the individual who will argue with you that you made the wrong decision. Even when I explained to that first agent we were going with a full-service broker because we felt we'd need a little more hand holding in this process, he threw a hissy fit about how his "big box" agency was indeed full service, that the other agents lied to us about it, and that we were making a huge mistake.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Columbia, SC
9,198 posts, read 18,294,480 times
Reputation: 6896
Quote:
Originally Posted by iSudo View Post
I generally agree that it would be nice to receive feedback as to why you didn't get the job or the contract or what have you. I agree that this information can allow you to grow professional if used wisely.

I think it's generally ill-advised to request this feedback, or on the other end, provide this feedback, because it potentially opens you up to claims of discrimination. Or worse, as in the first example I provided above, you get the individual who will argue with you that you made the wrong decision. Even when I explained to that first agent we were going with a full-service broker because we felt we'd need a little more hand holding in this process, he threw a hissy fit about how his "big box" agency was indeed full service, that the other agents lied to us about it, and that we were making a huge mistake.
First, it's normal for people to be upset, regardless of profession, when they don't get a job they want. Some people, regardless of profession, handle it better than others. You happened to have 1 bad one, but don't get to hung up on that. It's life. Move on. There are a few people like this in the industry. It just means you were wise to weed him out.

I agree with the other agents though that asking for feedback is perfectly acceptable. I disagree that you open yourself up to discrimination lawsuits, assuming you aren't hiring based on the protected classes.

I missed on a listing a few months ago and asked why the selected the other agent. Their primary reason was he had recently sold a home in the neighborhood (which is not a great reason, btw, general public) and he had a better online presence.The one they hired is an excellent agent, and I told them so and wished them the best. This was great feedback for me because I actually have a better online presence, but he did a better job of promoting his online presence than I did. It alerted me to the fact I need to make sure of what's important to the seller in their decisions and promote our online marketing better.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
37,672 posts, read 46,523,617 times
Reputation: 63088
You think you’re offended now, but there will likely be many other opportunities to feel that way before you are done.

Like, spending time and effort getting ready for a showing, leaving the house for an hour and a half, and they don’t show up.
Like never getting any feedback from buyer’s agents.
Like never seeing or hearing from your agent once he gets the listing.
Like never seeing your house advertised except online.

There are probably more, but I’ve blocked it out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 09:12 AM
 
145 posts, read 38,835 times
Reputation: 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
You think you’re offended now, but there will likely be many other opportunities to feel that way before you are done.

Like, spending time and effort getting ready for a showing, leaving the house for an hour and a half, and they don’t show up.
Like never getting any feedback from buyer’s agents.
Like never seeing or hearing from your agent once he gets the listing.
Like never seeing your house advertised except online.

There are probably more, but I’ve blocked it out.
Lol, oh trust me, been down this path already.

You'll have to pull up my other couple of threads about my experiences thus far.

Dealing with agents is definitely dealing with a different breed than I'm used to in my day-to-day life.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 09:15 AM
 
145 posts, read 38,835 times
Reputation: 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brandon Hoffman View Post
First, it's normal for people to be upset, regardless of profession, when they don't get a job they want. Some people, regardless of profession, handle it better than others. You happened to have 1 bad one, but don't get to hung up on that. It's life. Move on. There are a few people like this in the industry. It just means you were wise to weed him out.

I agree with the other agents though that asking for feedback is perfectly acceptable. I disagree that you open yourself up to discrimination lawsuits, assuming you aren't hiring based on the protected classes.

I missed on a listing a few months ago and asked why the selected the other agent. Their primary reason was he had recently sold a home in the neighborhood (which is not a great reason, btw, general public) and he had a better online presence.The one they hired is an excellent agent, and I told them so and wished them the best. This was great feedback for me because I actually have a better online presence, but he did a better job of promoting his online presence than I did. It alerted me to the fact I need to make sure of what's important to the seller in their decisions and promote our online marketing better.
Like I said, I don't mind giving feedback if it's requested in an appropriate manner. We did that in our initial "rejection" emails to them, and we thought we were being polite with that response. But it just opened us up to criticism of our final decision at least in the one case.

The unprofessionalism is what bothers me. This doesn't happen, or at least it's heavily frowned upon, in most of Corporate America. It's the kind of nonsense that hiring managers will tell you will get you blackballed from an industry.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
6,405 posts, read 3,591,313 times
Reputation: 17278
Well there’s a lot of really big loud personalities in this business. It’s not my style but it works with some people.

A Realtor Should stop short of badmouthing or accusing other agents of malfeasance Without any evidence of such. Even if the agent is not a member of the NAR, they shouldn’t do this if they intend to work in the same town with other agents for very long.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top