U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 11-19-2008, 07:25 AM
 
Location: Charlotte
12,647 posts, read 9,154,381 times
Reputation: 1674

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs.Bewitched View Post
and first, reps to all who helped! I have to say, I might be more confused now with all of the tech. talk

Here's what I can offer:

1. In April of 08, a month before I moved in, there was a survey for boundary lines taken of my house. I do have the paperwork on that.

2. I do not have an elevation survey, or not one that I can find if it had been taken years prior. I do not think it had been taken years prior only for the sole fact that my property has not previously been listed in a flood zone.

3. What is this "GPS"? Is this something that I DO let a surveyor use?

4. A couple of you have spoken about travel time. Wouldn't each city have a surveying company, or more than one, so that I wouldn't have to schedule someone from counties away?

5. The flood insurance company I called warned me that they have seen cases of people who got a surveyor, then sent over the Certificate of Excellence, to find out that the surveyor did not fill it our completely and then because the people had to call him back out to fill it out, the surveyor gave them another charge! The insurance said this happens quite frequently. What can I do to prevent this from happening to me?

6. IS $600, which was the only estimated price thrown out, an accurate estimate?

7. Do I need a raised seal, or am I allowed to get this Certificate emailed to me?


Thank you every one for your help!!
Surveyors are typically independent contractors hired during the Real Estate process. If property is being sold, surveyors are somewhere on hand, your closing attorney should have a few to refer. You should make certain you have a full detail of what the Flood Insurance Company will require, explain to the surveyors the type of survey you need, establish the price and show him (or her) the documents the Flood Insurance company will need filled out in full detail in order for the surveyor to be paid. If they don't meet the requirements of the Flood Insurance Company when the survey is completed, they haven't earned the fee.

I'd certainly want the raised seal, Kinko's can shrink it and you can email it to the Flood Insurance Company if this is acceptable to them.

GPS - Global Positioning System, easy way to look at it is basically satellites orbit the earth and communicate with a device telling it where it is, it takes minimum 3 satellites to form a triangle on a position and consider it a somewhat accurate read. The device will measure longitude, latitude, and altitude (elevation) to help determine it's position for the device reader. The most common way to envision them is the navigation system in a car.

Hope this helps, Good luck!
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-19-2008, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Venice Florida
1,381 posts, read 3,685,535 times
Reputation: 793
If I were you I'd simply call the survey company that did your survey when you purchased. Ask them for a quote. The survey companies in my area normally do a survey and elevation for under $600. The elevation certificate will provide you with the lowest finished floor elevation. They should provide you with multiple sealed documents certified to you and your mortgage holder. Most companies will send you the certificates via US mail. You will need to provide a copy to your insurance provider to get a quote on flood insurance. Hopefully your house is build above the flood elevation. Even if it's not, your insurer will provide you with flood insurance.
The prior owner probably did not have an elevation done since the property was not deemed in a flood zone.

Last edited by FLBob; 11-19-2008 at 07:54 AM.. Reason: typo
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2008, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
19,765 posts, read 31,656,940 times
Reputation: 16856
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLBob View Post
If I were you I'd simply call the survey company that did your survey when you purchased. Ask them for a quote. The survey companies in my area normally do a survey and elevation for under $600. The elevation certificate will provide you with the lowest finished floor elevation. They should provide you with multiple sealed documents certified to you and your mortgage holder. Most companies will send you the certificates via US mail. You will need to provide a copy to your insurance provider to get a quote on flood insurance. Hopefully your house is build above the flood elevation. Even if it's not, your insurer will provide you with flood insurance.
The prior owner probably did not have an elevation done since the property was not deemed in a flood zone.
Right-o.
I would call them first.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2008, 08:51 AM
 
1,305 posts, read 778,989 times
Reputation: 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs.Bewitched View Post
and first, reps to all who helped! I have to say, I might be more confused now with all of the tech. talk


Here's what I can offer:

1. In April of 08, a month before I moved in, there was a survey for boundary lines taken of my house. I do have the paperwork on that.
That's good news for you. If in fact you need a survey, contact the same suveyor and ask him to bid the job for the elevation. You can call a few other surveyors as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs.Bewitched View Post
2. I do not have an elevation survey, or not one that I can find if it had been taken years prior. I do not think it had been taken years prior only for the sole fact that my property has not previously been listed in a flood zone.
That's fine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs.Bewitched View Post
3. What is this "GPS"? Is this something that I DO let a surveyor use?
GPS is a way of location where you are on the earth using satellites that orbit the eaarth. As long as you have a clear view of the atmosphere, it's perfectly fine for a surveyor to use GPS as long as it can be corrected for accuracy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs.Bewitched View Post
4. A couple of you have spoken about travel time. Wouldn't each city have a surveying company, or more than one, so that I wouldn't have to schedule someone from counties away?
I have no idea if there is one in your city. Check the phone book and call around to find out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs.Bewitched View Post
5. The flood insurance company I called warned me that they have seen cases of people who got a surveyor, then sent over the Certificate of Excellence, to find out that the surveyor did not fill it our completely and then because the people had to call him back out to fill it out, the surveyor gave them another charge! The insurance said this happens quite frequently. What can I do to prevent this from happening to me?
No reputable surveyor should fill out a form incomplete. Make sure you give them the right form and have them fill it out completely. Read it over when it is done to make sure it's filled out right. If the insurance company rejects the form, then work with the surveyor to correct it at no charge.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs.Bewitched View Post
6. IS $600, which was the only estimated price thrown out, an accurate estimate?
The cost of surveying depends on the level of detail you need, the size of your parcel, the terrain of your parcel, and other factors. Asking how much it costs to hire a surveyor is like asking "how much does a used car cost?" Used cars vary depending on age, mileage, brand, condition, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs.Bewitched View Post
7. Do I need a raised seal, or am I allowed to get this Certificate emailed to me?
The certificate will need to be stamped with the suveyor's seal.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2008, 10:08 AM
 
10,394 posts, read 17,161,002 times
Reputation: 8344
Hi - we recently purchased a small home in Manatee County in a flood zone (closed in July). Our surveyor did the boundary survey and provided the elevation certificate all at the same time. Possibly you can go back to your surveyor and see if they can provide the certificate for you at a a reduced cost?

At any rate, I am sure you know you will be required by your mortgage company to get flood insurance, so be prepared.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2008, 12:00 PM
 
43,401 posts, read 47,342,340 times
Reputation: 13837
A friend of mine that bought a house a few years ago had to have a flood survey done before he bought bedcuase of the cost if it was not in the right plane. I think he apid like $500 and the guy measured to a marker that was set by the federal governamnt. He said it is required by martgage compny before they would OK the loan in county areas of Texas.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2009, 03:24 AM
 
2,356 posts, read 3,691,247 times
Reputation: 477
I am looking to buy a house that does not have CO on a garage that was added. Who pays for the survey ? I am in New York.
The reason I'm asking is because of the CO issue wouldn't the seller need a survey anyway ?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2009, 03:44 AM
 
21,797 posts, read 37,414,092 times
Reputation: 10755
Certificate of Occupancy is issued by City, and their requirements are all over the map. If no survey was done of the foundation / footprint BEFORE the building permits were issued the job should never have gone to completion if the City has any kind of field inspection process...

CO is generally issued when all field inspections are satisfied. If some were not done you may need to plan for "partial demolition" to allow for inspection(s). Might need to get attorney too...
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2011, 04:10 PM
 
1 posts, read 10,509 times
Reputation: 10
"1. In April of 08, a month before I moved in, there was a survey for boundary lines taken of my house. I do have the paperwork on that." - This would be a boundary survey only, and is likely not tied into the same datum as what would be needed for an elevation certificate.

"2. I do not have an elevation survey, or not one that I can find if it had been taken years prior. I do not think it had been taken years prior only for the sole fact that my property has not previously been listed in a flood zone." Elevation Certificates are primarily used by the Insurance Industry to provide an accurate rate quote. If you're above the Base Flood Elevation (BFE) you'll see a lower rate than if you're below the BFE. There are other factors they consider too.

FEMA will also accept an Elevation Certificate in lieu of an Elevation Form when homeowners are applying for a Letter of Map Amendment (LOMA).

"3. What is this "GPS"? Is this something that I DO let a surveyor use?" - Not sure why you're asking this question. GPS and Total stations, theodolites, electronic distance measures and metal tapes are all a means to measure the land and establish elevations. If the benchmark the surveyor needs to tie out to derive an elevation for your finish floor is miles away, then using GPS will make it go a lot faster than if he need to traverse for miles. GPS stands for "Global Positioning System" and was created by the military to stop using "dead reckoning" by U.S. Navel ships. It started in the early 1960's and has since been adopted by civilian land surveyors using 'differential GPS methods" to a survey grade accuracy level. It's really not anything to be concerned about.

"4. A couple of you have spoken about travel time. Wouldn't each city have a surveying company, or more than one, so that I wouldn't have to schedule someone from counties away?" - If you're talking with someone out of your county, then they're going to charge for travel time. I would simply try to find someone competent in your county. If they're aren't any, then you'll have to pay more for expertise.

"5. The flood insurance company I called warned me that they have seen cases of people who got a surveyor, then sent over the Certificate of Excellence, to find out that the surveyor did not fill it our completely and then because the people had to call him back out to fill it out, the surveyor gave them another charge! The insurance said this happens quite frequently. What can I do to prevent this from happening to me?" - I've never heard of a "Certificate of Excellence". Were these Licensed Land Surveyors or just a scam? Sounds like a joke to me or a grade school award. Make sure you read the contract carefully. Does it say "FEMA Elevation Certificate"? Sometimes people think Elevation Certificates will remove them from the insurance need. You'll need a LOMA for that; which is an additional service. Some people do the LOMA themselves and want copies of Deeds or maps that are required so they ask the surveyor. He is going to want to be paid for his time (like all of us do). Additionally, some people loss the original an want a new orignal - that's extra time spent.



"6. IS $600, which was the only estimated price thrown out, an accurate estimate?" - This is a very good price for certain zones. It may be cheaper is zones where you don't need a know datum to tie into. It may be too cheap in zones where a small topographic map need to be prepared. I have more information on the logic if you want to talk.

"7. Do I need a raised seal, or am I allowed to get this Certificate emailed to me?" - A wet seal is better since it will show up if you make copies. Surveyors typically use raised seals if State Law mandates it or if they are worried about people stealing the seal and posing as a land surveyor (yes this does happen). The surveyor will mail you the original, and keep only a copy for himself (of course, since he is the surveyor, he can make as many originals as he wishes.)


Moderator cut: no manual signatures allowed, no references to your company

Last edited by SouthernBelleInUtah; 08-04-2011 at 12:36 PM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-04-2011, 10:48 AM
 
1 posts, read 10,434 times
Reputation: 11
We moved into our house in 1998. We live near the Mahwah River and most of our backyard is wetlands. No one can build there. We were paying about $675 for flood insurance at that time and now we are paying $2,500. FEMA, those big f---ups, are involved and when the government is involved, you can bet there is some kind of scam going on. They get our money and do nothing. We are going around in circles trying to find out why our next door neighbor, who has the same house and same is basement, is paying almost $1,000 less! It is all B.S. Sooner or later, everyone is going to be under water. That is what is happening all over our country. The storms are getting worse and more water is flooding areas that never were flooded before. I know that we are required to have flood insurance by our mortgage company, but it is like throwing money down the toilet!
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $89,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top