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Old 03-11-2009, 11:02 AM
 
14 posts, read 74,975 times
Reputation: 16
Default Bumping out sides of home as an upgrade

Hello all,
First time new construction buyer here with a question I have searched for in the forums but haven't found a discussion on. We have the option to bump out either or both sides of our home by 2 feet and we're trying to figure out whether it's worth it to do so.

Bumping out the left side will give us about 139 total additional square feet on the dining room, kitchen, breakfast area, master bedroom, master closet, kid/guest bedroom, and kid/guest closet. The cost of this upgrade is about $76/square foot.

Bumping out the garage side will give us about 111 total additional square feet on the bonus room, the 2 other kid/guest bedrooms (but not closets), laundry room, and 1 kid/guest bath, plus an additional 52 square feet of garage space. The cost of this upgrade is about $88/square foot in the home ($60/square foot if you include the extra garage space as part of the calculation).

Given that the per square foot price of the rest of the house without any bumpouts is $117/sq ft, it seems like bumping out both sides would be a great idea. However, this being my first time going through the process, naturally I am suspicious.

Is there anything I'm failing to consider? Our budget can accomodate the added cost. We just don't know if this would be money well spent. Your thoughts and input are most appreciated. :-)

Last edited by Mink&Monk; 03-11-2009 at 11:04 AM.. Reason: Tech difficulties
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Old 03-11-2009, 11:28 AM
 
1,097 posts, read 2,329,292 times
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I don't know - by my calculations you're spending an extra $20,000 and you're not getting an extra room out of it. I'm not sure it will be worth it in terms of resale value.
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Old 03-11-2009, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Hernando County, FL
8,490 posts, read 10,386,560 times
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It is really dependent upon what is going to make you happy and the current room sizes.
I have seen many newer homes with small bedrooms and an extra 2 feet would really help with resale on these homes.
If the bedrooms are average size or smaller you may want to consider it.
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Old 03-11-2009, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Knoxville
3,225 posts, read 9,667,683 times
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Seems like a lot of work for only 2 feet (foundation, exterior walls and roof). Are you just extending on the roof, adding a shed roof (have to watch what it looks like) or re-configuring the roof?

What is the age and condition of the rest of the roof? Did you account for re-roofing the entire house when you do the addition? Depending on how you do it, you could end up with a new section of roofing, patched onto an older roof. It could end up looking really bad if you don't tie it all together.

Kind of a basic addition idea is to make it look like it was built that way originally, and not just a bunch of add-on's tacked here and there.

The other thing to consider is the set backs and if the two feet messes with that.
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Old 03-11-2009, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Clayton, NC
499 posts, read 923,351 times
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^^^^ OP said this is new construction. I'm assuming it hasn't been built yet (i.e. pre-construction). So re-roofing and tie ins wouldn't apply. OP, please correct me if I'm mistaken.

I agree that it all depends on the original sizes of the rooms. Also consider lot sizes and the sizes of other homes in the subdivision, if that's where you'll be. Doing the bump-out will put you that much closer to your property line and neighbors if your lot isn't very large. Additionally if the home is already fairly large making it larger might be a disadvantage. it's not always a good idea to be the biggest home on the neighborhood as it could hurt your resale later.
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Old 03-11-2009, 01:21 PM
 
14 posts, read 74,975 times
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Yes, this is new construction and nothing has been built yet. We just signed the contract last night and were told we have 7 days to change our minds on any structural options (after that point we can still add/drop but there are fees involved). Initially we decided to just do the bump on the dining side since that would give us more space in the kitchen, dining, and master. Then we started thinking maybe we should do both sides.

The house with no bump-out at all is 2520 sq ft, so with both sides bumped that takes us to 2770. Other homes in the subdivsion range between 2100-2965 sq ft, so we wouldn't be the biggest, although in a small subdivision we could be the biggest of our plan if no one else does the bump-out on both sides. Not sure if that would hurt or help..? But I definitely didn't think about the lot size either...that is certainly something to consider. The lots next to us are unsold, so it is hard to visualize now, but one good thing is our lot is one of the larger ones and we are the last on our street to face our street, so the layout should help us if we did bump out both sides. So many things to consider!!

The bedrooms are a decent size as is. M/I (our builder) seems to do the additional bedrooms bigger than most we've seen in our area. We looked at some KB homes under the Martha Stewart brand where the additional bedrooms were unbelievably tiny. So the bedroom size is okay, but by no means large!! We chose the plan because it had everything we wanted (4 BR, bigger bonus) without having a lot of what we would consider to be wasted space, both in oversized rooms and rooms we wouldn't use (e.g. formal LR, den, sitting room in master). So we are trying to strike a balance between being practical and having a little luxury. It can be overwhelming though!!

Thanks a bunch for your responses...it helps a lot to hear others' thoughts!!
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Old 03-11-2009, 08:44 PM
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
17,178 posts, read 15,225,887 times
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I am building a home where I just bumped out the garage 5 ft at about $40 a sq ft. Total cost was about $4k. It will not add any footage to the house but it sure will make me happy that I can actually get 2 cars in a garage and open the car doors.

If it makes you happy, within the price range of the community and is some benefit to your family, I'd do it.
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Old 03-11-2009, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Kailua Kona, HI
2,576 posts, read 5,482,490 times
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I vote for the side of master BR. But, what is the setback requirement for the subdivison? Try to imagine how close the house would be to the property line (and possible next house) if you decide on the bump out, on either side. Bumping out both sides will put you in the realm of that "largest house" in the area which has been said, can be a negative. Always think of re-sale when buying or building.
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Old 03-11-2009, 11:56 PM
 
957 posts, read 194,618 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mink&Monk View Post
The house with no bump-out at all is 2520 sq ft, so with both sides bumped that takes us to 2770. Other homes in the subdivsion range between 2100-2965 sq ft, so we wouldn't be the biggest, although in a small subdivision we could be the biggest of our plan if no one else does the bump-out on both sides. Not sure if that would hurt or help..?
I vote for no bump-outs, because this is a large house to begin with, assuming you don't have 4+ kids, and you've given no good reason (to me) for why you might do a bump-out. This is a lot of money that I assume you don't have to burn. Even if you got the whole amount back at resale, you'd pay interest on it and there'd be an opportunity cost. Think of what else you could spend that money on instead that you'd get more benefit from (not necessarily at resale or even for the house). If you still come back to a bump-out as the best place to put that money, then there must be a really good reason that I'm not seeing here. If you don't need the room and you're thinking of the resale appreciation on that extra space, that's leveraged speculation, which has burned a lot of folks lately.

BTW I used to have a 2500 sq. ft. house, with 2 kids, and we rarely used 1000 sq. ft. of it (foyer, living room, dining room). Now I'm in 1900 sq. ft., still with 2 kids, and still w/ room to spare. Your mileage may vary of course.
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