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Old 03-19-2010, 02:14 PM
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
18,709 posts, read 17,465,963 times
Reputation: 17858

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Quote:
it sounds like someone is using the slope as an excuse, not a reason
Buyers go into homes neutral but are looking for reasons to eliminate a home compared to similar homes that may be in their top 2-3 houses. If all things are equal a sloped back yard may be just the thing to push a buyer to another home. Your home may be number 3 on their list but it never makes it to the top spot.

You can call it both, an excuse or a reason but the buyer has just eliminated your house as a potential purchase. Doesn't matter what you think, it only matters what they think about the yard.

I've had many a buyer with kids that the 1st place they go when looking at a house is straight to the back yard. They eliminate many homes based on the yard and never look at the home.

Backyards are high priority to many families.
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Old 03-19-2010, 02:15 PM
 
146 posts, read 363,983 times
Reputation: 93
Have your kids run up and down the hill when prospective buyers come around. Have them slip a few times too, so people can see that kids are built for falling on grass.

But seriously, sorry, it's hard to say without seeing the yard. Perhaps get a quote on a retaining wall, so you can advise buyers of that option and how much more that will set them back.
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Old 03-19-2010, 02:25 PM
 
22 posts, read 39,278 times
Reputation: 10
I have a quote for the retaining wall (because we were going to put one in before we decided to move) but were also going to put in a bunch of (already tall) trees...so our quote is higher than in would be for a regular retaining wall. I was just wondering if there is something visually that I can do to make it better.

At the bottom of the "hill" is a greenway with a jogging trail. A bunch of the neighbors kids run down the hill and ride their bikes and stuff on the greenway jogging trail. I thought it was perfect for kids. I don't know how to explain that to potential buyers when I am not there.

I am selling with a great realtor....which thinks I am getting beat out by houses with flat yards that are the same price or cheaper. Thank you all for your feedback. I look forward to additional comments.
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Old 03-19-2010, 02:33 PM
 
21,723 posts, read 37,184,337 times
Reputation: 10714
I've of the mindset that as long the home / site is safe there is enough variation in the pool of buyers that pretty much anything can find the right person.

Does that slope mean a better view? More privacy? Potential to build a pool or tennis court? It is all in finding the right hook.

Landscaping might be something you could think about, even just hiring a landscape architect and paying for sketches might be the kind of inspiration that will resonate with some buyers. If you are talking an actual "ravine" then maybe some kind of nature-friendly stair could be part of the plans, but I would hesitate to actually install such a "feature" as it might be expensive / require permits / go unappreciated by buyers...

As others have said YOU find the place appealing enough so odds are some one else will too and this is NOT a terrible situation where the slope is improperly dumping rain and melting snow back TOWARDS your foundation -- that is something you would need to have remedied if there were issues with seepage and such. Count your blessing!
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Old 03-19-2010, 02:56 PM
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
18,709 posts, read 17,465,963 times
Reputation: 17858
Quote:
Originally Posted by twinmma View Post
Very true...we have learned A LOT over the years and 7 transactions. A Lot of what not to do, lol!
Now that your an agent and those 7 transactions turn into 50 or 300, think of all the good things you'll learn as an agent. Some you will learn the hard way.

You've got to love an inexperienced buyer when they say "why do I need an agent? ". It's all the issues you learn to avoid after years of experience. Which way a yard slopes and how steep is one of the many.
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Old 03-19-2010, 03:06 PM
 
845 posts, read 1,476,704 times
Reputation: 288
Quote:
Originally Posted by rjrcm View Post
Great, now the OP just needs to figure out how to move the property to Berkeley .

I guess when I wrote that I should have considered that some had the misfortune of attending public schools in Arizona. But to be more specific; people routinely pay 1 million plus for little bungalows that need 100K worth of work on seriously sloping lots. Upslope is easier to build on than downslope is what the realtor told me when I was looking at Oakland Hills Fire lots about 15 years ago. Drainage and soil erosion need serious consideration.
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Old 03-19-2010, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Tempe, Arizona
4,511 posts, read 7,489,447 times
Reputation: 2106
Quote:
Originally Posted by adolpho View Post
I guess when I wrote that I should have considered that some had the misfortune of attending public schools in Arizona. But to be more specific; people routinely pay 1 million plus for little bungalows that need 100K worth of work on seriously sloping lots. Upslope is easier to build on than downslope is what the realtor told me when I was looking at Oakland Hills Fire lots about 15 years ago. Drainage and soil erosion need serious consideration.
My point was that your post did not contribute anything to the OP's issue. Of course, location will affect price. Unless the OP's property is in Oakland or Berkeley, I doubt they will get $1M for it.
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Old 03-19-2010, 03:26 PM
 
Location: NJ
17,580 posts, read 21,138,047 times
Reputation: 15428
A flat yard was definitely part of my search, but not so much that price and the rest of the house couldn't overcome it.
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Old 03-19-2010, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Tempe, Arizona
4,511 posts, read 7,489,447 times
Reputation: 2106
Quote:
Originally Posted by adolpho View Post
I guess when I wrote that I should have considered that some had the misfortune of attending public schools in Arizona. ...
Oh, and you can blame CA on the quality of my education, a mix of both private and public, although I don't consider myself unfortunate in that respect .
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