U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink > Recipes
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-17-2010, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Edmond, OK
4,037 posts, read 9,162,579 times
Reputation: 4174

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Caligula1 View Post
Whats the difference between Stuffing and dressing??

Acording to Food network stuffing is from inside the bird..
If it's cooked seperately it's called dressing.. I just heard this last night.
Yes, that's what I've always heard as well. We just kind of use the two terms interchangeably, but we do usually refer to it as dressing. Since no one I know actually puts it in the bird, everyone just assumes whichever term you use, it's being cooked in a separate baking dish.

SIL and her family always called it filling. I haven't heard anyone else refer to it like that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-17-2010, 01:52 PM
 
Location: South GA
10,887 posts, read 9,866,129 times
Reputation: 20878
I have cooked my turkey this way for 20 years - I learned it from my mother. The only difference is that I cook it on 500 for one hour, then turn the oven off. THREATEN TO KILL ANYONE WHO OPENS THE OVEN DOOR! However, since I have a convection oven now, I am afraid to turn the oven off totally, so turn down to 200. I also cook mine breast side down. When you try to move the turkey, it simply falls to pieces and the bones will pull out. The meat including the white meat is sooooo juicy and tender. I have told many people how to do this, and they are amazed at how good and easy this is. I make sure the turkey is stuffed with as many onions as I can get in there! It is so wonderful to get up to that smell of turkey!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-21-2010, 11:47 PM
 
Location: Happy in Utah
1,224 posts, read 3,005,121 times
Reputation: 912
I cooked a roast with this method. i used to date a guy who would make the turkey on a gas grill, it cooked all day and never was dry and nobody got sick. I am thinking odf doing the slow method too on the turkey also. What is the differance of doing poultry in a crockpot low heat long cooking then doing a trukey this way in a oven
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-28-2014, 10:08 PM
 
3 posts, read 1,654 times
Reputation: 10
Default Note to Cherry

BASMATI RICE will go good with your 22 pound turkey and your PANERA bread !!! ....Cherry, make sure you season the inside of the turkey. ......ALSO Cherry, make sure your pan of water is boiling hot underneath the turkey so the OVEN TEMP is not reduced by the pan of water.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2014, 11:42 AM
 
1,632 posts, read 1,492,243 times
Reputation: 1306
I would never cook a bird that big on low temperature
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2014, 11:52 AM
 
7,672 posts, read 9,861,757 times
Reputation: 7945
OP, where do you keep it while waiting to serve it?

We eat around 7PM and they like it hot from the oven. Do you reheat it to a certain temp right before serving?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-05-2014, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,832,557 times
Reputation: 28187
The low-and-slow method of cooking turkeys has been used successfully by BBQers for years - the one imperative in the process: the turkey must reach 140F within the first four hours. After that, smooth sailing for another 4 - 6 hours.

Gotta love that sweet, tender bird enhanced by a bit of apple wood smoke.

BYW - the temperature in my BBQ pit is 225F - 250F.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2014, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Former LI'er Now Rehoboth Beach, DE
7,771 posts, read 10,452,052 times
Reputation: 7759
Another thought for this thread. I buy a fresh turkey as opposed to frozen and I saw on TV last year and again this year that WASHING a turkey is a big no-no. It spreads bacteria into the sink etc, I noticed that even the label it does not mention washing the bird. I find that pretty scary as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2014, 03:11 PM
 
1,453 posts, read 2,852,412 times
Reputation: 1117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
The low-and-slow method of cooking turkeys has been used successfully by BBQers for years - the one imperative in the process: the turkey must reach 140F within the first four hours. After that, smooth sailing for another 4 - 6 hours.

Gotta love that sweet, tender bird enhanced by a bit of apple wood smoke.

BYW - the temperature in my BBQ pit is 225F - 250F.
I've grilled turkey outdoors on my Weber kettle grill for years. I use charcoal and indirect heat for at least 4-5 hours. Then I put the turkey in the oven for the last hour. I've never had any problems.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2014, 01:13 AM
 
1,789 posts, read 1,440,718 times
Reputation: 3680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caligula1 View Post
I wouldnt cook a turkey like this myself and i'd be sure my instant read thermometer read at least 165 allowing for a 10 degree carry over cooking temp after it was covered with foil out of the oven.
I wouldnt feel comfortable going to bed with my oven on most likely it would keep me awake.
Dont ask me what I'd do if I had a wood burning stove to heat my home in the winter.
165 is plently....175 is too much....I hate dry turkey and 175 is sure way to get dry turkey.

Quote:
Originally Posted by B4U View Post
To each his own, I say.
Thank you for your post & ideas, Elnine.

I, however wouldn't do this.
1.) I too wouldn't/don't leave the oven on overnight.
2.) I would get alittle heebie-jibbie with low-temp cooking. Even though you have stated you've done this and must be healthy & still kicking.

3.) No stuffing in the bird. NO STUFFING IN THE BIRD!!??? Are you kidding me? My family would slaughter me like the bird! I make stuffing on the side too, but is never as tasty as from the bird, and we all fight over "bird stuffing".

4.) We look at "waiting for the bird", as an opportunity. We drink, smooze, eat nibbles (appetizers), fight over the liver I cook in alittle butter, S & P, and generally relax.
It's a day experience. Not just a meal to be done & over. It's tradition.

But to those who don't have the luxury of that, your idea is good.

ENJOY YOUR MEAL.
My method is actually kind of close to the OP but I cook at a higher temp for longer then turn it down low for several hours.

There is no way to make good stuffing/dressing if you cook it in the bird. yep. I use a huge braising pan and use a wire rack in the bottom to lift the bird up off the bottom of the pan about 2 inches. I toss in some butter, good chicken stock, seasoning, carrots, celery and onion. All the drippings from the turkey wind up in that pan so when the turkey is almost done I drain off all the liquid from the pan and use that and stir it into crumbled cornbread to make dressing and to add into making the giblet gravy. No stuffing in the bird to mess with the cooking and still get dressing that tastes like it was cooked in the turkey.

I grew up with a wood stove/fireplace in the living room that was lit all winter so I don't have a problem with leaving a stove on all night. I never though about it really but I would probably be more wary of an electric one..but mine is gas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink > Recipes
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top