U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink > Recipes
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-27-2012, 01:48 PM
 
Location: West Texas
2,441 posts, read 5,360,827 times
Reputation: 3107

Advertisements

I'm looking for a good recipe for a steak in a wine sauce (something similar to a Steak Diane). I've tried some over the last year, but couldn't find anything that I really liked. The last one I tried a couple nights ago had me reducing the wine... but that seemed to take the flavor out of it.

Here's some things that might help narrow the recipe search down:

1. I prefer ribeye steaks. They are always a good thickness and marbling.
2. We like seasonings, so salt, pepper, garlic power, onion powder, etc. are okay.
3. We love garlic, so that would be a bonus if in the recipe.
4. We love mushrooms, so if those are included, great. But it's not a requirement to have them.

Thanks for any recipes y'all can forward!!

~ Rath
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-27-2012, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
16,649 posts, read 26,639,849 times
Reputation: 26596
Hmmm. I've never done anything like what you're looking for -- my husband doesn't eat red meat -- so I don't know why I even read this thread... BUT, when you mentioned mushrooms, it gave me an idea.

What if you did a chicken marsala (mushrooms, butter, marsala wine) but substituted the chicken for steak, instead?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-27-2012, 02:25 PM
 
3,499 posts, read 5,158,988 times
Reputation: 6513
Here's one. You could substitute the rib eye for the hangar steak. And I don't see how throwing in some minced garlic could hurt it! Let us know how it turns out.

Hanger Steak With Mushrooms and Red Wine
Makes 4 servings
Each animal has only one hanger steak, a cut that "hangs" within the rib cage. Tender and with a deep beefy flavor, most hanger steaks weigh about 3/4 pound and make a generous serving for one or a "normal" serving for two. Don't be shocked by the number of mushrooms in this recipe. They shrink considerably. I have grilled the steaks here, but you can sauté them in olive oil in a sauté pan over high heat or on a stove-top grill pan.
• 2 hanger steaks, about 3/4 pound each
• Salt and freshly ground black pepper
• 4 tablespoons butter
• 1 1/4 pounds cremini mushrooms, quartered vertically
• 1 tablespoon olive oil
• 3/4 cup full-bodied red wine
• 2 tablespoons More Than Gourmet Demi-Glace Gold concentrate (optional; see note)

Let the steaks come to room temperature. Season on both sides with salt and pepper.
Prepare a hot fire for direct grilling in a grill (see note).
In a large sauté pan, melt the butter over high heat. When the butter froths and then begins to subside, add a handful of the mushrooms, stir or toss for a minute or two, and add another handful of mushrooms. Continue in this way until you have added all the mushrooms and they have browned and any liquid they released has evaporated. This will take about 10 minutes total.
Meanwhile, rub the steaks on both sides with the olive oil. Place on the grill rack and grill, turning once, for about 4 minutes total for rare, 5 minutes for medium-rare or 8 minutes for well done.
Let the steaks rest for 5 minutes in a warm spot while you finish the sauce. Add the wine and demi-glace, if using, to the mushrooms and boil for a few minutes until the liquid develops a saucelike consistency.
Slice the steaks and place on warmed plates. Spoon the mushroom sauce over the steaks.
Note: For this recipe, the demi-glace is not reconstituted; use it straight from the package. Find it at Zupan's, Whole Foods and other stores that carry a wide selection of gourmet foods.
Note: To check grill temperature, count the seconds you can hold your hand, palm side down, 2 to 3 inches above the rack, until it feels uncomfortable: 2 seconds for hot.
Adapted from "Meat: A Kitchen Education" by James Peterson
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-27-2012, 02:26 PM
 
25,631 posts, read 30,331,549 times
Reputation: 23111
What you want is a Bordelaise sauce.


Plenty of classic receipes for it on the web.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-27-2012, 05:34 PM
 
10,139 posts, read 23,224,188 times
Reputation: 8284
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldogdad View Post
What you want is a Bordelaise sauce.


Plenty of classic receipes for it on the web.

I so much agree with this.

There is a world of difference between a steak cooked in wine sauce and a steak with a great wine sauce on the steak.

A good steak should not be cooked in anything, but can certainly benefit from Bordelaise sauce, or Madiera.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-28-2012, 11:10 AM
 
Location: West Texas
2,441 posts, read 5,360,827 times
Reputation: 3107
Quote:
Originally Posted by DandJ View Post
Hmmm. I've never done anything like what you're looking for -- my husband doesn't eat red meat -- so I don't know why I even read this thread... BUT, when you mentioned mushrooms, it gave me an idea.

What if you did a chicken marsala (mushrooms, butter, marsala wine) but substituted the chicken for steak, instead?
I actually do a good chicken marsala, and have tried to switch the chicken for steak, but found the marsala wine (for whatever reason) was more greatly subdued in flavor with the steak.

But thanks for the suggestion!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-28-2012, 04:49 PM
 
25,631 posts, read 30,331,549 times
Reputation: 23111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rathagos View Post
I actually do a good chicken marsala, and have tried to switch the chicken for steak, but found the marsala wine (for whatever reason) was more greatly subdued in flavor with the steak.

But thanks for the suggestion!!

Oh I see how it is

I give you the best wine sauce ever devised for beef and it gets a nod of approval from Mr Wilson but it's not good enough to get even a mention from you?

Huh.

Just kidding hope your steak came out great.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-28-2012, 06:19 PM
 
10,139 posts, read 23,224,188 times
Reputation: 8284
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldogdad View Post
Oh I see how it is

I give you the best wine sauce ever devised for beef and it gets a nod of approval from Mr Wilson but it's not good enough to get even a mention from you?

Huh.

Just kidding hope your steak came out great.

The problem with Bordelais is that many people are intimidated with two stage sauces. After all, who keeps demi-glace sauce around the house?

My son does these two stage French classics in stride. I cheat.

Bordelais for me means saute some shallots in butter, add beef broth and a good Bordeaux, reduce for ever, add a little fresh thyme, stir in the steak drippings or plate juice (or more butter if there is no fat in the juice) and sit the steak in it on the plate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-29-2012, 10:49 AM
 
25,631 posts, read 30,331,549 times
Reputation: 23111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
The problem with Bordelais is that many people are intimidated with two stage sauces. After all, who keeps demi-glace sauce around the house?

My son does these two stage French classics in stride. I cheat.

Bordelais for me means saute some shallots in butter, add beef broth and a good Bordeaux, reduce for ever, add a little fresh thyme, stir in the steak drippings or plate juice (or more butter if there is no fat in the juice) and sit the steak in it on the plate.
Very true. I cheat by buying the demi-glace from Trader Joes.

Don't even get me started on making the espagnole sauce the basis for demi glace, ugh
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2012, 08:26 AM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
24,671 posts, read 58,163,562 times
Reputation: 26518
Sautée chopped onions in ghee (I prefer this as it doesn't burn like butter or oil) until barely tender, add chopped/minced garlic and briefly cook, add chopped fresh mushrooms, stir, add red wine (I like Manischewitz Concord Grape which I'd never drink but it's wonderful for meat recipes!) plus a little concentrated beef stock paste (Minors is an excellent product), bring to a boil then reduce heat, cover and simmer for 10 minutes. Best to add less wine than more as you can always add some. Add ground black pepper to taste and salt if needed.

Sorry about not including quantities but that's the way I cook!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink > Recipes
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top