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Old 10-02-2007, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
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We never had goulash, but my grandmother made what she called hash....leftover pot roast and gravy and diced potatoes, carrots and diced onion simmered until the flavors were blended - it was so delicious - she made the best gravy and pot roast so the has was divine.
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Old 10-03-2007, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Somewhere out there
18,260 posts, read 20,549,537 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cattknap View Post
We never had goulash, but my grandmother made what she called hash....leftover pot roast and gravy and diced potatoes, carrots and diced onion simmered until the flavors were blended - it was so delicious - she made the best gravy and pot roast so the has was divine.
My Grammie made that for us too. I always asked for it for my birthday supper too. I love that hash!
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Old 10-03-2007, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Denver
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When we were little, my mom called "goulash" spaghetti meat sauce with elbow macaroni instead of spaghetti noodles!!
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Old 10-03-2007, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
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is this a midwestern thing? Never been served anything called goulash in my life.
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Old 10-03-2007, 11:15 AM
Status: "Á la recherche d'un emploi" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: South Bay Native
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I guess this debate is as old as the hills. What westerners refer to as goulash is actually what Hungarians refer to as "Pörkölt" which is a braised meat (or mushroom) dish. A traditional pörkölt does not include anything more than cubed red meat, onions, garlic, Hungarian paprika, and salt. Adding bell peppers, tomatoes, pasta, potatoes, rice, etc. seems ghastly to someone who grew up eating the traditional version, although I have seen it served in Hungary with a trickle of sour cream on top (certainly not mixed into the dish). It is usually served with Hungarian dumplings (similar to the German "Spätzle") and cabbage salad. If you travel to Hungary, pretty much all the restaurants will serve this dish in the way that I have described it.

Now "gulyás", which is where the word goulash comes from, is actually a soup or stew, made with similar ingredients to those I already listed, but it can be prepared with cubed potatoes and/or dumplings cooked right into the stew. It is traditionally made over a fire in a cauldron, and different regions have different traditional methods to prepare this.

Another related Hungarian dish is "paprikás" which is a similar recipe but with chicken or fish (csirke paprikás or hal paprikás). The chicken paprikás is where the green peppers are added, and usually cooked together with potatoes as a one-pot dish.

I personally don't take offense when someone calls a concoction with ground beef and elbow macaroni "goulash" because everyone has their own idea of what a goulash is based on what they grew up with. The key ingredient though is the paprika, and the best in the world happens to be Hungarian. I don't think anyone with culinary chops would ever try to argue that point.

For anyone who thinks goulash is the bee's knees, you should travel to Hungary some day and make a point to spend at least one day in the Hortobágy area so you can sample some 'Hortobágyi húsos palacsinta' - one of my personal favorites of Hungarian cuisine.
Attached Thumbnails
Goulash-porkolt.jpg   Goulash-hortobagy_palacsinta.jpg  
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Old 10-03-2007, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Penobscot Bay, the best place in Maine!
1,893 posts, read 5,255,158 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Our version had no beans or paprika, but we called it American Chop Suey

Yep. Though we never say the "American" part.. it's just chop suey.
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Old 10-03-2007, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
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Ok, here is Mom's version of Ghoulash:

brown hamburger meat
elbow macaroni
can of tomato soup
Large can of whole tomato's (do not drain!!) all of it goes in and you tear apart the tomato's with your hands so there are chunks.
salt, pepper, garlic
stir together. let simmer on the stove for a little while until all the flavors get to meld. Even better the next day for left overs.

We love it!! Now I am an adult and stil make it. My brother is staying with us, and was up in Phillie on business recently. He called me at home around 4pm and was just getting ready to get on a plane to come home. I told him, I'm making ghoulash. He came straight home, walks in the house and says "where the ghoulash, I"m starving. I wouldn't eat anything because I didn't want to ruin my appetite." LOL!! Now that is a diehard : )

Shelly
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Old 10-03-2007, 04:01 PM
 
111 posts, read 392,255 times
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Originally Posted by shellytc View Post
, Even better the next day for left overs.
Oh Yes!! We feel the same way.

Sometimes we don't even eat it until the next day.
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Old 10-03-2007, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Deep In The Heat Of Texas
2,639 posts, read 2,446,726 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Debsi View Post
is this a midwestern thing? Never been served anything called goulash in my life.
My parents were from NY / NJ and then we moved to CA. Maybe the name "goulash" is from the east coast.
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Old 10-03-2007, 05:14 PM
 
2,222 posts, read 9,443,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighlandsGal View Post
When we were little, my mom called "goulash" spaghetti meat sauce with elbow macaroni instead of spaghetti noodles!!
That was pretty much what my mom made too, only she would add green beans. I grew up on it and so did my son, and he loved it too. My mom was born and raised in Chicago, but spent most her life in California.
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