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Old 09-30-2012, 12:01 PM
 
14,197 posts, read 23,882,514 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DontLookPhoto View Post
Not ! Everyone we know likes it as soon as it is cool enough to slice and serve. Day old bread in our humble opinion us is well on its way to tasting stale.

Day old chili is a different story !

Many breads - especially those with rye and other heavier grains - have a far more developed taste on the second and third days from the oven.
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Old 09-30-2012, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Islip,NY
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I make quick breads like pumpkin, banana or lemon pecan bread. I do make one bread that has yeast in it called Orange marmalade bread. It's one my mom has been baking for years and we only make around Christmas. I also make a loaf around the time of birthday in January as well. It can be time consuming with all the rising that takes place so I only make it 2 times a year.
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Old 09-30-2012, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Zebulon, NC
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For anyone who likes cheesy bread, these Gruyere stuffed crusty loaves are amazing. They have a blog post with more detailed instructions and mouth-watering photos.
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Old 09-30-2012, 02:31 PM
 
Location: SW MO
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My wife bakes our bread - usally a whole grain loaf like the ones she baked in the early 70s on a wood stove here in the Ozarks. Now she's back in the Ozarks and she's baking again. Delicious. She bakes other breads, rolls, etc. as well but the whole grain is a staple in our home. All I bake is a delicious, healthy snack cookie and Amish friendship bread which is not so healthy but delicious as well.
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Old 09-30-2012, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Almost Paradise
1,671 posts, read 1,665,253 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
My wife bakes our bread - usally a whole grain loaf like the ones she baked in the early 70s on a wood stove here in the Ozarks. Now she's back in the Ozarks and she's baking again. Delicious. She bakes other breads, rolls, etc. as well but the whole grain is a staple in our home. All I bake is a delicious, healthy snack cookie and Amish friendship bread which is not so healthy but delicious as well.
Does she still use a wood stove? My great aunt used a wood stove for years, even after my great uncle bought her an electric stove. Her biscuits and bread were the best I've ever tasted!

I used to bake bread when my kids were younger. Reading these posts has made me want to begin again!
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Old 09-30-2012, 04:09 PM
 
Location: SW MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nALgirl View Post
Does she still use a wood stove? My great aunt used a wood stove for years, even after my great uncle bought her an electric stove. Her biscuits and bread were the best I've ever tasted!

I used to bake bread when my kids were younger. Reading these posts has made me want to begin again!
I've offered to install one but so far she's doing fine with a regular stove and oven. Back in 1971 on a small rural farm, the wood stove was all she had.

I don't think you'll be sorry if you begin again. Store bread is so full of preservatives it's barely bread at all and bakery prices are ridiculous. Fortunaely we're surrounded by 1800s mills. Fresh, stone ground flours are a good start.
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Old 10-01-2012, 08:23 AM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
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Just wanted to comment on using a bread machine or a mixer. One of the best parts of baking my own bread is the hand mixing and kneading and the forming of the loaves. Relaxing comfort is the only way I can describe it and I remain convinced that my sweaty hands and dripping brow only add to the flavor!

On holidays I used to make appropriately formed breads. Maybe my creations required a little bit of imagination to see them as turkeys, reindeer or easter bunnies but ...
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Old 10-01-2012, 11:33 AM
 
Location: St. Croix
737 posts, read 2,240,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STT Resident View Post
Just wanted to comment on using a bread machine or a mixer. One of the best parts of baking my own bread is the hand mixing and kneading and the forming of the loaves. Relaxing comfort is the only way I can describe it ...
This is the way I begin my day. I totally take out all of my frustration, anxiety or no problem at all by kneading my bread. It is so simple and takes very little time since my mis en place is ready before I go to bed. I get the coffee going and get the first rise going and look forward to punching down my bread. I have just the right sugar level for my white and just the right rise times for my baguette that I actually look forward to the mornings!

Simple pleasures.

Now I add my grill pan filled with water on the bottom of my oven to my white bread while baking for a really great crust. But constantly changing and adding different methods, ingredients. Ah, the wonderful world of baking.

I failed on the sourdough, miserably. Probably won't revisit that disaster.
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Old 03-04-2017, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Jollyville, TX
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Default Any bread bakers here?

Now that I am retired and have some time on my hands, I thought I would try my hand at baking bread. I have used a bread machine and can't say I was impressed. I have a Cuisinart food processor with a dough blade and that seems help considerably with the kneading effort. However, I just can't seem to get the texture I am looking for. I've tried several recipes including the no-knead bread, the King Arthur hearth bread, and a Betty Crocker recipe. All of them seems to be lacking a good yeasty flavor and they are a little denser than I would like.

So, if you bake bread, tell me your secrets! I am interested in what kind of yeast you use, bread flour or AP, how long you knead the dough, whether or not you use oil in the recipe and anything else you can tell me that would help me learn to be a better bread baker.

By the way, there are NO good bakeries around here which is one of the reasons I am making it myself. Whole Foods and Central Market are probably the best, but I can't say I am terribly impressed with any of their breads. There is a certain satisfaction to making your own as well. Thanks.
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Old 03-04-2017, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,517 posts, read 26,301,485 times
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I like to bake bread and started out with a bread machine years ago. That was OK. For the past 8 years or so I enjoy kneading it by hand but yes I have also used my KitchenAid.

For starters I have never gotten the texture that comes in a prepackaged loaf of bread like Wonder. We just don't use enough preservatives

This was one of my first loaf recipes and although it is a sweet bread it is very good...from Allrecipes. Amish Loaf Bread:
Amish White Bread Recipe - Allrecipes.com



I taught my niece who was 14 at the time to make this French Bread, from Taste of Home, she is not precise by any means but she makes a good loaf
Sesame French Bread Recipe | Taste of Home


And two more I have been successful with:


Everything Braided Bread(on my blog)
Mike and Lisa's World: Everything Braided Bread


And Kaiser rolls:
Mike and Lisa's World: Kaiser Rolls




In the past I tried adding gluten to make some breads less dense. I didn't see the difference so I stopped using it. I use Fleischmann's Instant Dry Yeast...not the fast acting one. I buy the bulk packs at Sam's club as they are much cheaper. Most of the time I use bread flour....not brand specific. If I don't have bread flour I was all purpose. Wheat also makes bread more dense. I have tried the white wheat and it is doable. White Bread flour still works the best for me.



Hope that helps.

Last edited by ylisa7; 03-04-2017 at 03:39 PM..
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