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Old 11-15-2012, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Sudcaroland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DontH8Me View Post
Actually, French onion soup is made with beef stock. If someone is a vegetarian then they are free to use whatever ingredients they wish, but for someone who wants to prepare traditional and authentic french onion soup then beef stock is the way to go. Learned this many moons ago from Julia Child. And I believe she used Cognac, not champagne. If you can find the old episode of her show where she devotes the entire episode on ways to prepare and serve this one dish, it's worth watching. I'm pretty sure it's from the time when her show was still in b&w.
I'm French, I cook the French way, lol. No beef stock in our onion soup! I don't know how Julia Child made hers, so I will watch the video out of curiosity. But from what I know about her, she adapted many recipes! Cognac in soup, that's a first. Interesting idea though.

Last edited by Sudcaro; 11-15-2012 at 07:14 AM..
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Old 11-15-2012, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Texas
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I've cooked French Onion Soup both ways, one with the sweet onions and the other with a mixture of white and yellow onions. I think it's just a matter of taste, but I didn't like the sweet onion at all and much prefer the mixture of white and yellow. I also like a mix of half chicken and half beef stock instead of all beef. Once the soup is fully cooked, I take it off the heat and finish with brandy.

I think the most important thing to making a good French Onion Soup is to get your onions nice and caramelized . I haven't read Tyler's recipe to see what kind of cheese he recommends, but my favorite cheese for this is gruyere.
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Old 11-15-2012, 09:38 AM
 
Location: South Bay Native
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PennyLane2 View Post
I've cooked French Onion Soup both ways, one with the sweet onions and the other with a mixture of white and yellow onions. I think it's just a matter of taste, but I didn't like the sweet onion at all and much prefer the mixture of white and yellow. I also like a mix of half chicken and half beef stock instead of all beef. Once the soup is fully cooked, I take it off the heat and finish with brandy.

I think the most important thing to making a good French Onion Soup is to get your onions nice and caramelized . I haven't read Tyler's recipe to see what kind of cheese he recommends, but my favorite cheese for this is gruyere.
Agree with the gruyere - ill have to try half chicken/half beef stock. I searched (in French) for authentic onion soup, and many recipes called for chicken stock or bouillon (didn't find any recipes calling for vegetable stock).

I think the bread is the most difficult to acquire, as crusty, European style hearty bread is hard to locate when stores are filled to the rafters with wonder bread style loaves. Here in LA, we have La Brea Bakery which is the closest I've found to the breads I've had all over Europe. I know grocery stores have loaves they call "French bread" but they are too pillowy soft in my opinion. If you can compress an entire loaf of bread into a pancake with just the pressure from your hands, that's not real bread.

I'm going to have to make some this weekend, the weather calls for it.
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Old 11-15-2012, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Canada
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WRT authentic French onion soup, here is an article in which the author tracked that down and says that traditionally the soup is made with vegetable stock, but here is a recipe from a Fench site that calls for a beef stock. Thought both were interesting.
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Old 11-15-2012, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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I just sent DH to the butcher to get 4-5 lbs of beef bones. I'm gonna try to make my own beef stock-not just for the soup but to freeze. Julia inspired me!
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Old 11-15-2012, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Niagara Falls ON.
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I wouldn't use a sweet onion for a couple of reasons. Sweet onions don't have much taste when cooked and for that reason I never use them to cook with. I always have some on hand because they are ALL I would use in a salad and I eat a lot of salads. The other reason is sweet onions cost 3 times regular yellow cooking onions so why use them in cooking especially when they are not as good. Big waste of $$ there in my opinion.
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Old 11-15-2012, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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I've used Vidalia and it works fine. But it's not as flavorful as when using a less sweet onion.
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Old 11-16-2012, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
I want to try Tyler
Florence's recipe and 1 reviewer said it was a mess cause she used Vidalia onions but she also used madiera wine which is too sweet. Another reviewer said Vidalia was just fine.
Do you think it would make any difference?

his recipe calls for red wine but others call for white wine. Which do you use.

some call for only beef broth while others mix beef and chicken. does it make any difference.?
Do you have a favorite FOS recipe?
I probably wouldn't use Vidalia, simply because they are just a bit too sweet. I like them raw...As for the wine, I would use red; either would work and btw, so would Vidalia if that is what you want to use...
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Old 11-17-2012, 06:25 PM
 
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The only hard and fast rule I know regarding FOS is that it should be made of yellow onions, skin and all for that deep-brown French color. Vidalias would certainly qualify.
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Old 11-18-2012, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Southern, NJ
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I use Vidalia, white wine, good Cognac & beef broth when I make my soup. 3 lbs. of onions, sweating in a bit of unsalted butter & then simmer for at least an hr. to get caramelized, before adding any other ingredients.
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